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140509 (wr) v1 presentation moocs beyond the hype

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Presentatie tijdens het EADL-congres 2014 over geleerde lessen ten aanzien van massive open online courses

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140509 (wr) v1 presentation moocs beyond the hype

  1. 1. Massive Open Online Courses: Beyond the Hype Wilfred Rubens http://www.wilfredrubens.com
  2. 2. Project leader, e-learning consultant, blogger Lector e-learning NTI
  3. 3. Project leader, e-learning consultant, blogger Lector e-learning NTI
  4. 4. EMMA • Providing multilingual access 
 to European MOOCs • Project, supported by EU • Aim: showcase excellence in innovative teaching methodologies and learning approaches through the large-scale piloting of MOOCs on different subjects. 3 #EUMoocs http://europeanmoocs.eu/
  5. 5. EMMA • System for delivery of MOOCs
 in multiple languages from 
 different European universities • To help preserve Europe’s rich cultural, educational and linguistic heritage • To promote real cross-cultural and multi-lingual learning 4 #EUMoocs http://europeanmoocs.eu/
  6. 6. Who of you already…. 5
  7. 7. Who of you already…. • Subscribed for a MOOC? 5
  8. 8. Who of you already…. • Subscribed for a MOOC? • Started a MOOC? 5
  9. 9. Who of you already…. • Subscribed for a MOOC? • Started a MOOC? • Completed a MOOC? 5
  10. 10. 6
  11. 11. 7
  12. 12. 7 Research on satisfaction and participation
  13. 13. Content • Once upon a time…. • Reasons for offering a MOOC • Pedagogical diversity of MOOCs • Case study • Lessons learned • Pedagogy and quality • Costs and benefits • MOOC: whats in a name? 8
  14. 14. Once upon a time… • 2003: Open educational resources came up • 2008: first MOOCs connectivism (term: Dave Cormier) • 2008: increasing focus on learning analytics • 2011: first xMOOCs by ‘elite’ universities (hugh amount subscriptions) • Coursera+Harvard+MIT: 5,6 million registered users (195 countries), ± 1700 MOOCs 9
  15. 15. 10 Foto: Audrey Watters
  16. 16. Reasons for MOOCs • Increasing accessibility (higher) education • Massive participation > feedback > quality • Impression courses: lead to regular courses • Marketing & branding • Valorisation • Innovation & improvement education (MOOC als laboratory) • New business model • Cost effectiveness 11
  17. 17. Pedagogical diversity • cMOOCs: learning in networks, distributed learning technology, non-hierarchical, co- creation • xMOOCs: video instructions, assessments (automatic feedback), fora with peers • Pedagogical diversity increases (respond to critique) 12
  18. 18. 12 Dimensional Classification Schema (Conolé, 2014) • Degree of openness • Scale of participation (massification) • Amount of use of multimedia • Amount of communication • Extent collaboration is included • Learner-centred - teacher-centred 13 • Level of quality assurance • Extent to which reflection 
 is encouraged • Level of assessment • Degree of formality • Degree of autonomy • Diversity of learners
  19. 19. Case study 14
  20. 20. Aims • Offering: keep up with e-learning profession (not interested in program) • High degree flexibility (e.g. learning needs) • Experimenting with MOOC: • Appropriate for professional development? • Meaningful learning experience with student-teacher interaction? • Alternative for cMOOC and xMOOC 15
  21. 21. Set up • Study tasks (different assignments). E.g. learning theories and e-learning, pedagogy and e-learning (partly based on learners needs) • Online live sessions (interviews, chat) • 45 (discussion) assignments • Self tests • ± 100 resources (articles, papers, videos) • Feedback by teachers • Dutch 16
  22. 22. Set up (2) • Turnaround time: 18 weeks • Study load: max. 120 hours (cherry picking was promoted) • Certificate (285 euro) 17
  23. 23. 12 Dimensional Classification Schema (Conolé, 2014) • Degree of openness: full (except registration and certificate) • Scale of participation: 890 learners subscribed • Use of multimedia: live sessions, video • Amount of communication • Collaboration (peer feedback) • Content mainly teacher-led, choices by learner • Reflection by assignments (e.g. blog posts) • No formal assessment 18
  24. 24. Hordenloop naar open en online onderwijs
  25. 25. Hordenloop naar open en online onderwijs Experiences with MOOC
  26. 26. Hordenloop naar open en online onderwijs See how we designed a MOOC
  27. 27. Hordenloop naar open en online onderwijs Acquiring knowledge about new profession
  28. 28. Hordenloop naar open en online onderwijs Keeping up to date about existing profession
  29. 29. Hordenloop naar open en online onderwijs Certification
  30. 30. Hordenloop naar open en online onderwijs Extent to which MOOC met reasons participation (N=226) Experiences with MOOC See how we designed a MOOC Acquiring knowledge about new profession Keeping up to date about existing profession Certification Other
  31. 31. Satisfaction • 45 participants: participated sufficiently to provide feedback MOOC • 24,5% (very) dissatisfied, 44,5% (very) satisfied • Mainly satisfied about online live sessions, resources, self assessments. • Satisfaction influenced by….
  32. 32. Participation • 226 respondents: 80% started • ‘Drop out’: 40% after 3 weeks, then gradually • > 82%: did not (at all) study intensively, 6% did study (very) intensively • 23 participants logged in 3 weeks after closure
  33. 33. Participation (2) • Lot of content used, relatively low degree of interaction • About 20% participated in group discussions • 88,5% less intensive than planned, 9,6% as much as planned • Has my contribution added value? • Issues with schedule largest barrier • Participants learn outside online environment
  34. 34. Lessons learned
  35. 35. Pedagogy and quality • Turnaround time: 8 weeks, study load ± 3 hours a week • Adapted release? • Offering different levels needed • Interaction: less intense as expected, high quality • High degree permissiveness (‘cherry picking’)
  36. 36. Pedagogy and quality (2) • Massive Open Online Content • MOOC ≠ regular course (permissiveness) • Motivation learners MOOC differ from learners regular course • Able to learn self-directed, learning preferences (passive learning), priority for learning in a MOOC
  37. 37. Costs and benefits 27
  38. 38. Costs and benefits 27 Average convertion rate: 2,4%
  39. 39. Please join me in calculating… 28
  40. 40. Please join me in calculating… • Investments in hours: 413 28
  41. 41. Please join me in calculating… • Investments in hours: 413 • In euro’s: 40.000 euro (development & implementation) 28
  42. 42. Please join me in calculating… • Investments in hours: 413 • In euro’s: 40.000 euro (development & implementation) • Income per certificate: 80 euro 28
  43. 43. Please join me in calculating… • Investments in hours: 413 • In euro’s: 40.000 euro (development & implementation) • Income per certificate: 80 euro • Needed: 500 paying participants 28
  44. 44. Please join me in calculating… • Investments in hours: 413 • In euro’s: 40.000 euro (development & implementation) • Income per certificate: 80 euro • Needed: 500 paying participants • Conversion ratio: 2,4% (=500 participants) 28
  45. 45. Please join me in calculating… • Investments in hours: 413 • In euro’s: 40.000 euro (development & implementation) • Income per certificate: 80 euro • Needed: 500 paying participants • Conversion ratio: 2,4% (=500 participants) • 20834 participants needed 28
  46. 46. Average amount of registrations was 20.000 29 Bron: http://www.katyjordan.com/MOOCproject.html
  47. 47. Benefits 30
  48. 48. Benefits • Laboratory 30
  49. 49. Benefits • Laboratory • Validation 30
  50. 50. Benefits • Laboratory • Validation • Reaching new target group 30
  51. 51. Benefits • Laboratory • Validation • Reaching new target group • Creating opportunity lifelong learning 30
  52. 52. Benefits • Laboratory • Validation • Reaching new target group • Creating opportunity lifelong learning • PR and branding 30
  53. 53. Benefits • Laboratory • Validation • Reaching new target group • Creating opportunity lifelong learning • PR and branding • Additional financing (temporarily) 30
  54. 54. Benefits • Laboratory • Validation • Reaching new target group • Creating opportunity lifelong learning • PR and branding • Additional financing (temporarily) • Data for research 30
  55. 55. Overall conclusions • MOOCs suitable for professional development (in case of self-directed learning, if learners process content, certification fosters) • Do not compare MOOCs with regular courses (motivation, drop out rate) • Laboratory for learning innovations (e.g. large scale interactions, self testing) • Combine content MOOCs with small scale online learning, F2F, informal learning 31
  56. 56. Overall conclusions (2) • Serious doubts business model • Teachers ‘pay the bill’ (development in own time) • Large scale participation: ’passive learning’ (LittleJohn, 2014) • Is student-teacher interaction a must for learning (compensation possible)? (Anderson, 2014) ! 32
  57. 57. Overall conclusions (3) • Explicit attention for practical application: requirement relevance corporate learning • Disruptive innovation depends on societal recognition • Pew Research 2014: employers still prefer diplomas (MOOCs not a meaningful alternative) 33
  58. 58. MOOC: what’s in a name? 34
  59. 59. MOOC: what’s in a name? 34
  60. 60. MOOC: what’s in a name? 34 Massive Open Offline Concert
  61. 61. MOOC: what’s in a name? 35
  62. 62. MOOC: what’s in a name? • A MOOC is a MOOC if it is a MOOC 35
  63. 63. MOOC: what’s in a name? • A MOOC is a MOOC if it is a MOOC • There is nothing wrong with an ‘ordinary’ e- learning (open) course (of good quality) 35
  64. 64. MOOC: what’s in a name? • A MOOC is a MOOC if it is a MOOC • There is nothing wrong with an ‘ordinary’ e- learning (open) course (of good quality) • Cheap standard courses: fixed low monthly fee 35
  65. 65. MOOC: what’s in a name? • A MOOC is a MOOC if it is a MOOC • There is nothing wrong with an ‘ordinary’ e- learning (open) course (of good quality) • Cheap standard courses: fixed low monthly fee • Curatr: facilitating social learning, gamification and curation 35
  66. 66. MOOC: what’s in a name? • A MOOC is a MOOC if it is a MOOC • There is nothing wrong with an ‘ordinary’ e- learning (open) course (of good quality) • Cheap standard courses: fixed low monthly fee • Curatr: facilitating social learning, gamification and curation 35
  67. 67. Questions? • wilfred.rubens@ou.nl • @wrubens • http://www.wilfredrubens.com

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