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Disaster risk reduction and education
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Disaster risk reduction and education

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Guillaume SIMONIAN

Guillaume SIMONIAN

Preparedness & DRR Section; United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)

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  • The overarching objective of DRR in education is the systematic integration of the analysis of disaster risks and disaster risk reduction measures into education sector development planning and subsequent financing obligations. UNICEF promotes the three commonly agreed ‘pillars’ of DRR education and school safety that are applicable at the national, sub-national and community level:  (1) The promotion of DRR in teaching and learning (inclusion in the formal school curricula and non-formal education); (2) The provision of safe school environments (school assessments, building codes); and (3) The promotion of school safety and disaster management (e.g. contingency planning, drills).
  • The overarching objective of DRR in education is the systematic integration of the analysis of disaster risks and disaster risk reduction measures into education sector development planning and subsequent financing obligations. UNICEF promotes the three commonly agreed ‘pillars’ of DRR education and school safety that are applicable at the national, sub-national and community level:  (1) The promotion of DRR in teaching and learning (inclusion in the formal school curricula and non-formal education); (2) The provision of safe school environments (school assessments, building codes); and (3) The promotion of school safety and disaster management (e.g. contingency planning, drills).
  • The overarching objective of DRR in education is the systematic integration of the analysis of disaster risks and disaster risk reduction measures into education sector development planning and subsequent financing obligations. UNICEF promotes the three commonly agreed ‘pillars’ of DRR education and school safety that are applicable at the national, sub-national and community level:  (1) The promotion of DRR in teaching and learning (inclusion in the formal school curricula and non-formal education); (2) The provision of safe school environments (school assessments, building codes); and (3) The promotion of school safety and disaster management (e.g. contingency planning, drills).
  • The overarching objective of DRR in education is the systematic integration of the analysis of disaster risks and disaster risk reduction measures into education sector development planning and subsequent financing obligations. UNICEF promotes the three commonly agreed ‘pillars’ of DRR education and school safety that are applicable at the national, sub-national and community level:  (1) The promotion of DRR in teaching and learning (inclusion in the formal school curricula and non-formal education); (2) The provision of safe school environments (school assessments, building codes); and (3) The promotion of school safety and disaster management (e.g. contingency planning, drills).
  • The overarching objective of DRR in education is the systematic integration of the analysis of disaster risks and disaster risk reduction measures into education sector development planning and subsequent financing obligations. UNICEF promotes the three commonly agreed ‘pillars’ of DRR education and school safety that are applicable at the national, sub-national and community level:  (1) The promotion of DRR in teaching and learning (inclusion in the formal school curricula and non-formal education); (2) The provision of safe school environments (school assessments, building codes); and (3) The promotion of school safety and disaster management (e.g. contingency planning, drills).
  • The overarching objective of DRR in education is the systematic integration of the analysis of disaster risks and disaster risk reduction measures into education sector development planning and subsequent financing obligations. UNICEF promotes the three commonly agreed ‘pillars’ of DRR education and school safety that are applicable at the national, sub-national and community level:  (1) The promotion of DRR in teaching and learning (inclusion in the formal school curricula and non-formal education); (2) The provision of safe school environments (school assessments, building codes); and (3) The promotion of school safety and disaster management (e.g. contingency planning, drills).
  • The overarching objective of DRR in education is the systematic integration of the analysis of disaster risks and disaster risk reduction measures into education sector development planning and subsequent financing obligations. UNICEF promotes the three commonly agreed ‘pillars’ of DRR education and school safety that are applicable at the national, sub-national and community level:  (1) The promotion of DRR in teaching and learning (inclusion in the formal school curricula and non-formal education); (2) The provision of safe school environments (school assessments, building codes); and (3) The promotion of school safety and disaster management (e.g. contingency planning, drills).
  • The Netherlands government provided a grant of $201 million (2006-2011) for UNICEF’s Education in Emergencies and Post-Crisis Transition (EEPCT) programmes which has significantly raised the profile of education in emergencies and post-crisis transition and has helped countries on a sustainable path towards quality basic education for all.  Twenty-one out of 40 EEPCT countries have specifically addressed education and disaster risk reduction (DRR). The programme has contributed to risk reduction both by ensuring that children have access to education in disasters and complex emergencies, and also by integrating knowledge on how to reduce risk and vulnerability into education programmes. Many country offices have worked in partnerships at the global, regional and country levels on initiatives such as: systematic national capacity development (individual and institutional capacities for emergency preparedness, contingency planning, and early warning), school-based disaster risk reduction and preparedness and safe school construction. Aim of the Study was to assess and document the outcomes for children as a result of the DRR activities supported by the EEPCT programme. This study used two country case studies, in the Philippines and Peru, as well as a wider consultation exercise in Africa, Asia and South America, to gather information on the outcomes for children as a result of these activitiesIn the Philippines there were examples of localised events occurring since EEPCT interventions that impacted upon schools targeted.
  • The integration of DRR into school curriculum is resulting in children who have a much greater understanding of disaster risk and who know what to do in an emergencyChildren are learning what risk means, and are being empowered to act in an effective wayThe following outcomes do not benefit children directly, but are key benefits of the overall programme and its ability to contribute to wider resilience:Communities have access to evacuation facilities as a result of new buildings and Communities are more aware and knowledgeable about disaster risk reduction, as they learn through their childrenIn Albay Province, Philippines, the majority of EEPCT funding went towards the repair and reconstruction of schools damaged by Typhoon Reming in 2006. In some cases, new buildings serve as both classrooms and evacuation centresIn Peru, a pilot school hosted a workshop for parents on DRR as a result of increased awareness and demand for knowledge
  • While it was not always possible to document the specific outcomes, it was very clear that significant change has occurred at both the national and the local levels. This change is leading to increased education and greater preparedness and resiliency amongst communitiesA number of recommendations came out of the study findings: Monitor and track outcomes for children as a result of DRR and education interventions. In many cases, respondents stated that a major disaster had not yet occurred to track the outcomes to children as a result of EEPCT funded activities. However, it was not clear that there were any monitoring systems in place to allow a tracking of outcomes. Evaluation reports and discussion almost entirely focused on outputs. Monitoring systems should be designed to take account of specific outcomes for children, as well as structural and institutional change.  Strengthen the focus on comprehensive risk assessment to guide programme activities. While risk assessment was used, it was not clear that it was used in a comprehensive manner to address all risks, or that it took a child-centered focus that ensures participation and hence awareness and ownership of resultant actions. It was also clear that, while education was one method of achieving risk reduction objectives, and indeed the core focus of the EEPCT, risk is multi-sectoral, and requires a comprehensive approach. It is clear that there is a need for risk assessments that are more comprehensive – multi-hazard, multi-sectoral, and child centered – and that are applied more systematically by UNICEF offices.  Find ways to leverage the ability of children to pass information throughout communities. A key strength of integrating disaster risk into education is that children take the information out into the wider community, and this can be leveraged, by identifying ways to use children as analyzers, designers, communicators and mobilizers of risk and risk reduction. Identify key leverage points for linking upstream capacity building and downstream service delivery to ensure that outcomes are sustained over the long term. UNICEF has a key role to play at a national level, building the enabling environment to allow NGOs to successfully implement sub-national and community level activities. Depending on the country context, it was clear that UNICEF also has a unique position to be able to link policy (national) and practice (local) and contribute to sustainable change at both levels. It seemed that there was a need to clearly define UNICEF’s role in education and DRR, and identify ways that UNICEF can leverage its key strengths to link policy and practice.
  • While it was not always possible to document the specific outcomes, it was very clear that significant change has occurred at both the national and the local levels. This change is leading to increased education and greater preparedness and resiliency amongst communitiesA number of recommendations came out of the study findings: Monitor and track outcomes for children as a result of DRR and education interventions. In many cases, respondents stated that a major disaster had not yet occurred to track the outcomes to children as a result of EEPCT funded activities. However, it was not clear that there were any monitoring systems in place to allow a tracking of outcomes. Evaluation reports and discussion almost entirely focused on outputs. Monitoring systems should be designed to take account of specific outcomes for children, as well as structural and institutional change.  Strengthen the focus on comprehensive risk assessment to guide programme activities. While risk assessment was used, it was not clear that it was used in a comprehensive manner to address all risks, or that it took a child-centered focus that ensures participation and hence awareness and ownership of resultant actions. It was also clear that, while education was one method of achieving risk reduction objectives, and indeed the core focus of the EEPCT, risk is multi-sectoral, and requires a comprehensive approach. It is clear that there is a need for risk assessments that are more comprehensive – multi-hazard, multi-sectoral, and child centered – and that are applied more systematically by UNICEF offices.  Find ways to leverage the ability of children to pass information throughout communities. A key strength of integrating disaster risk into education is that children take the information out into the wider community, and this can be leveraged, by identifying ways to use children as analyzers, designers, communicators and mobilizers of risk and risk reduction. Identify key leverage points for linking upstream capacity building and downstream service delivery to ensure that outcomes are sustained over the long term. UNICEF has a key role to play at a national level, building the enabling environment to allow NGOs to successfully implement sub-national and community level activities. Depending on the country context, it was clear that UNICEF also has a unique position to be able to link policy (national) and practice (local) and contribute to sustainable change at both levels. It seemed that there was a need to clearly define UNICEF’s role in education and DRR, and identify ways that UNICEF can leverage its key strengths to link policy and practice.

Disaster risk reduction and education Presentation Transcript

  • 1. DRR and Education for UNICEF
  • 2. UNICEF and DRR: objectives4 global objectives:1. DRR for children and women is a national and local priority2. Different risks faced by girls, boys and women are identified and addressed3. Safer and more resilient conditions for girls, boys and women are created4. Humanitarian preparedness, response & early recovery is strengthened
  • 3. UNICEF and DRR: principles• Emergency risk informed programming = child-centred programming factoring disaster risk in UNICEF specialised sectors• Analyse risks• Develop capacities• Reduce vulnerabilities• Facilitate and encourage child participation
  • 4. Education: a key sector for UNICEF DRR strategy All UNICEF DRR Initiatives DRR/Cross-sector 1% 0% Education 3% 1% 10% Food Health1% 5% Multi-sector 1% Nutrition Protection 21% 57% Shelter WASH Other
  • 5. UNICEF DRR and Education:An integrated structure internally and with partners• Promotion of child-centred (DRR) in Education Sector Development, Policy and Planning bridges a gap between development and humanitarian programmes by improving the provision of quality education• Supported in the Policy and Development Education Section, and in the Emergency Department at HQ• Supported by dedicated education specialists and dedicated DRR specialists at regional level• Implemented by Education officers and by Emergency officers at country level
  • 6. DRR and Education for UNICEF: 3 pillars
  • 7. Examples from around the world: across all pillarsBangladesh:Support to curriculum and teacher training updates to include at local levels.Pre-positioning of teaching and learning materials in high risks cyclones and flooding risk areasBuilding of transitional schools to enable children to continue their education.Participation of children also in activities to identify school vulnerabilitiesDevelopment of DRR strategies and contingency plans with the involvement of school management committees (activated for the benefit of 83,000 children thus far).
  • 8. Examples from around the world: Safe school facilitiesRwanda:Development of Child Friendly Schools Infrastructure Standards for the Rwandan Ministry of Education, articulating levels of acceptability and providing practical guidance on how to achieve them.Madagascar:Construction and rehabilitation of cyclone- resistant schools
  • 9. Examples from around the world: Disaster Prevention EducationCuba:Strengthening skills of children and teachers in environmental risk management in primary and secondary schools in vulnerable areas of Pinar del Rio provinceGuyana:Support to the curriculum development for infusion of CCA into the national curricula for Nursery, Primary & Secondary levelsDevelopment of teacher guides & supporting DVDs.
  • 10. Examples from around the world: Disaster management and preparednessKazakhstan: photo- Enhancement of government’s disaster preparedness strategy in education sector- Improved capacities of national education and emergency actors to assist local disaster preparedness and response- Best practices, tools, experiences on DRR in schools identified, systematized and disseminated throughout the countryBelize:Support to prepositioning of Governmental stock of school in a box in support of the national emergency plan.
  • 11. Examples from around the world: Education plans and policiesJordan:Capacity mapping in risk assessment and planning, physical & environmental protection, and response capacity for 100 schools in high risk areas.Establishment of a baseline of the awareness level and capacities of schoolsMeasurement of the impact of interventions in comparison to the base line
  • 12. Education in Emergencies and Post-Crisis Transition (EEPCT) ProgrammeEEPCT Programme:Global $201M grant to UNICEF (2006-2011) to advance education inemergency in all dimensions.21 of 40 EEPCT countries specificallyaddressed education and DRR.DRR Activities worked at coordinationbetween Ministries of education,national DRR systems, regionalinstitutions and NGOs and advancedthe Education and DRR agenda.
  • 13. EEPCT PROGRAMME: WHAT DRR OUTCOMES FOR CHILDREN?Results Examples1. Children better prepared • Philippines: children2. Children proactively identify and prepared emergency bags address risk in communities for typhoons or volcanic3. Children learn how to identify and eruptions, and determined address a variety of other risks safety levels for the crossing (road safety, household fires, etc) of streams, contributing to a4. Children provided with the reduction of loss of life and opportunity to continue injuries education in emergencies, • Peru: children lobbied the5. Children feel more secure and government to select a safer confident escape route for tsunami
  • 14. EEPCT PROGRAMME: CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONSCONCLUSIONS:• Significant change occurred at national and local levels: increased education, greater preparedness, more resilient communities• Different lessons learned if activities were focused on downstream service delivery or upstream capacity buildingRECOMMENDATIONS:• Monitor and track outcomes for children in DRR and education• Strengthen focus on risk assessment to guide activities• Leverage the ability of children to pass information to communities• Link upstream capacity building and downstream service delivery to ensure that outcomes are sustained over the long term
  • 15. THANK YOU!Guillaume SIMONIAN:gsimonian@unicef.org