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Cellulitis

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Cellulitis

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Cellulitis

  1. 1. Cellulitis A Clinician’s Approach to Treatment By- Dr. Armaan Singh
  2. 2. Objectives  To understand the definition of cellulitis  To know what treatment is appropriate  To know when hospitalization is needed
  3. 3. Definition  Cellulitis is a skin infection that develops as a result of bacterial entry via breaches in the skin barrier.  Manifests as erythema, edema, and warmth.  Predisposing factors include disruption to the skin barrier as a result of trauma, inflammation, preexisting skin infection (ie tinea pedis), and edema.
  4. 4. Diagnosis  Diagnosis is based upon clinical manifestations. Cultures of blood, needle aspirations, or punch biopsies aren’t useful in mild infection.  Cultures should be performed in patients with systemic toxicity, extensive skin involvement, underlying comorbidities (ie diabetes), animal bite, or recurrent cellulitis.  Radiographic exam can be useful in excluding occult abscess and osteomyelitis.
  5. 5. Microbiology  Most common pathogens are beta-hemolytic Strep and Staph aureus, including MRSA. Gram-negative aerobic bacilli are identified in a minority of cases.
  6. 6. Treatment  Antibiotic selection for treatment depends on whether presentation consists of purulent or nonpurulent cellulitis (per 2011 ID Society of Americal guidelines).
  7. 7. Treatment: Purulent cellulitis  Patients with purulent cellulitis (purulent drainage or exudate, in the absence of a drainable abscess) should be managed with empiric therapy for infection due to MRSA.
  8. 8. Treatment: MRSA  Options for empiric oral therapy for MRSA: 1) Clindamycin 300 to 450 mg PO TID 2) Bactrim 1-2 DS tab PO BID 3) Doxycycline 100 mg PO BID 4) Linezolid 600 mg PO BID  Depends on clinical response but a time course of 5-10 days is usually appropriate.
  9. 9. Treatment: Nonpurulent Cellulitis  For nonpurulent cellulitis, cover for beta-hemolytic Strep and MSSA.  MRSA coverage is warranted for patients fail initial therapy, signs of systemic illness, recurrent infection in the setting of underlying predisposing conditions, and previous episode of MRSA infection.  Empiric MRSA coverage should be used in patients with risk factors for MRSA and in communities with high prevalence of MRSA.
  10. 10. Treatment: Nonpurulent  Options for Nonpurulent cellulitis (excluding MRSA) 1) Dicloxacillin 500 mg PO every 6 hours 2) Cephalexin 500 mg PO every 6 hours 3) Clindamycin 300 to 450 mg PO every 6-8 hours  Depends on clinical response but a time course of 5 to 10 days is usually appropriate.
  11. 11. Treatment: MRSA and Nonpurulent  Options for empiric oral therapy for beta-hemolytic Strep and MRSA: 1) Clindamycin 300 to 450 mg PO TID 2) Amoxicillin 500 mg PO TID + Bactrim 1 to 2 DS tabs PO BID 3) Amoxicillin 500 mg orally TID + Doxycycline 100 mg orally twice daily 4) Linezolid 600 mg orally BID  A time course of 5 to 10 days is usually appropriate.
  12. 12. Treatment Requiring Hospitalization  Parenteral therapy should be considered for patients with extensive soft tissue involvement, fever or other signs of systemic illness, or patients with diabetes or other immunodeficiency.
  13. 13. TREATMENT: IV ANTIBIOTICS  Vancomycin is antibiotic of choice for MRSA skin infections and for those requiring hospitalization.  For those who fail or can’t tolerate Vancomycin: DaptomycinTigecylcline and Linezolid are alternative treatments.
  14. 14. Case presentation  A 48 year old male with history of HTN, Hyperlipidemia, GERD, CKD on HD M,W,F (2/2 HTN) who presents to your office with complaint of left leg swelling and redness for the past 2-3 days. He states that this has never happened before and that he his worried because it has been worsening. He denies any recent travel. He’s also noted some liquid draining from the area as well.
  15. 15. Case presentation  On exam, his left leg is seen on the below image:
  16. 16. Case presentation  What should your (the physician) next step be: a)Tell him to raise his leg to help with swelling b)Get an outpatient ultrasound to assess for a blood clot c)To give him oral Keflex to treat a cellulitis d)Admit to inpatient medicine for IV antibiotics
  17. 17. Case presentation  You call the triage resident and notify them that you are directly admitting this patient for parenteral antibiotics.  What antibiotic choice is warranted in this patient? a) cefazolin b) vancomycin c) daptomycin d) clindamycin
  18. 18. SUMMARY  Cellulitis manifests as erythema, edema, and warmth.  Diagnosis is based upon clinical manifestations.  Most common causes are beta-hemolytic Strep and Staph aureus.  Management should include supportive measures.  For non-purulent cellulitis, empiric therapy of beta-hemolytic Strep and MSSA. Patients with non-purulent cellulitis and MRSA risk factors should be covered for beta-hemolytic Strep & MRSA.  Patients with purulent cellulitis should be managed with empiric therapy for infection due to MRSA.  For those requiring hospitalization, Vancomycin is antibiotic of choice pending culture results.

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