Syntax
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

Syntax

on

  • 2,807 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
2,807
Views on SlideShare
2,794
Embed Views
13

Actions

Likes
3
Downloads
114
Comments
1

3 Embeds 13

http://www.mrdaley.com 10
http://mrdaley.com 2
http://chuckthewalrus.com 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Syntax Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Syntax
    Subjects and Predicates
    Phrases
    Clauses
    Simple Sentences
    Compound Sentences
    Complex Sentences
  • 2. What is Syntax?
    The study of rules for forming sentences.
    Noun
    Language of Origin – Greece
    1605
    Synonym = Sentence Structure
  • 3. What is a sentence?
    Subject (The performer of an action)
    Predicate (the action)
    Hewalked.
    His favorite catexploded.
    The turtlewondered into the tiger’s cage.
    Martywas buried in tuna fish for eleven years.
  • 4. Simple Subject / Simple Predicate
    Simple Subject = One word
    (NOUN or PRONOUN)
    The performer of the action
    Simple Predicate = One word
    The action (VERB)
  • 5. Phrase
    A group of words missing either the subject, predicate, or both
    The wicked queen (missing predicate)
    Fighting the dragon (missing subject)
    Under the bridge (missing both)
  • 6. Clause
    A group of words with a subject and a predicate
    Independent Clauses
    Subordinate (Dependent) Clauses
  • 7. Independent Clause
    A Clause that makes sense on its own
    A COMPLETE SENTENCE !
    Jenny left early.
    Todd and Terry went to the mall.
    The book was very interesting.
  • 8. Subordinate (Dependent) Clause
    A Clause that does not make sense on its own. It needs to be attached to an independent Clause.
    After it stopped raining…
    Unless Jesse stops snoring…
    Until the team arrives…
  • 9. Simple Sentences
    Only one Independent Clause
    Can have many phrases
    I will visit Paris this summer.
    Over the river, and through the woods, to grandmother’s house I go.
  • 10. Compound Sentences
    Two independent Clauses combined together with a coordinating conjunction or a semi-colon ( ; )
    Marty brought the sandwiches, and Carmen brought the drinks.
    Marty brought the sandwiches; Carmen brought the drinks.
  • 11. Coordinating Conjunctions
    Used to bring independent clauses together
    FANBOYS
    For
    And
    Nor
    But
    Or
    Yet
    So
  • 12. Complex Sentences
    One dependent clause combined together with an independent clause using a subordinating conjunction.
    After she receives the prize, Molly will go to Disneyland.
  • 13. Subordinating Conjunctions
    Used to begin a dependent clause
    Always at the beginning of a dependent clause
    after, although, as, because, before, if, in order that, no matter, since, so that, than, though, unless, until, when, whenever, wherever, which, while, even though
  • 14. Fragment
    A phrase or dependent clause acting as if it were a sentence.
    After dinner.
    “Ouch!”
    Running through the grass.
    Why me?
  • 15. Summary
    Simple Subject = the doer (noun or pronoun)
    Simple Predicate = the verb
    Clause = Subject + Predicate
    Phrase = missing subj. or pred. or both
    Simple Subject = 1 Independent Clause
    Compound Sentence = 2 Ind. Clauses w/coordinating conjunction
    Complex Sentence = 1 Ind. Clause + 1 Dep. Clause w/subordinating conjunction