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Sentence Structure<br />The sequence and connection of the words, phrases, and clauses that constitute sentences. <br />SY...
Syntax Terms<br />Subject<br />Predicate<br />Simple Subject<br />Simple Predicate<br />Independent Clause<br />Dependent ...
Compound Sentence
Complex Sentence
Coordinating Conjunction
Subordinating Conjunction</li></li></ul><li>A Sentence<br />Contains a subject and a predicate <br />Can stand alone as a ...
Subject<br />Tells who or what the sentence is about<br />Consists of the simple subject and all of its modifiers.<br />Th...
Predicate<br />The part of the sentence performed by or describes the subject.<br />Consists of the verb and all of its mo...
Simple Subject<br />A noun or pronoun completing or receiving the action.<br />Theboydrove to the store. <br />
Simple Predicate<br />Only the verb completed by the simple subject <br />The boy droveto the store.  <br />
Independent Clause<br />Another word for COMPLETE SENTENCE<br />Consists of a SUBJECT and PREDICATE <br />Contains a compl...
Dependent (Subordinate) Clause<br />A group of words that contains a subject and a predicate, but cannot stand alone.<br /...
Phrase<br />A group of words that lacks a subject, a predicate or both.<br />Screaming like a banshee – missing a subject<...
Fragment<br />A sentence that lacks a subject, a predicate or both and is punctuated at its end. <br />Screaming like a ba...
Appositive <br />A noun or noun phrase that describes a nearby noun or pronoun. <br />Set off by commas. <br />Mark, the s...
Simple Sentence<br />Consists of ONE INDEPENDENT CLAUSE<br />Can have phrases <br />The boy drove to the store. <br />The ...
Coordinating Conjunction<br />Coordinating conjunctions join <br />single words<br />groups of words<br />always join simi...
Subordinating Conjunction <br />The largest class of conjunctions<br />Connect subordinate clauses to a main clause. <br /...
Correlative Conjunction <br />Correlative conjunctions also connect sentence elements of the same kind (like Coordinating ...
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Syntax

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Syntax

  1. 1. Sentence Structure<br />The sequence and connection of the words, phrases, and clauses that constitute sentences. <br />SYNTAX<br />
  2. 2. Syntax Terms<br />Subject<br />Predicate<br />Simple Subject<br />Simple Predicate<br />Independent Clause<br />Dependent (Sub) Clause<br />Phrase<br />Fragment<br />Appositive <br /><ul><li>Simple Sentence
  3. 3. Compound Sentence
  4. 4. Complex Sentence
  5. 5. Coordinating Conjunction
  6. 6. Subordinating Conjunction</li></li></ul><li>A Sentence<br />Contains a subject and a predicate <br />Can stand alone as a grammatical unit<br />Also called an INDEPENDENT CLAUSE<br />The boy drove to the store. <br />
  7. 7. Subject<br />Tells who or what the sentence is about<br />Consists of the simple subject and all of its modifiers.<br />The boy drove to the store. <br />
  8. 8. Predicate<br />The part of the sentence performed by or describes the subject.<br />Consists of the verb and all of its modifiers, objects, and complements. <br />The boy drove to the store. <br />
  9. 9. Simple Subject<br />A noun or pronoun completing or receiving the action.<br />Theboydrove to the store. <br />
  10. 10. Simple Predicate<br />Only the verb completed by the simple subject <br />The boy droveto the store. <br />
  11. 11. Independent Clause<br />Another word for COMPLETE SENTENCE<br />Consists of a SUBJECT and PREDICATE <br />Contains a complete thought<br />The boy drove to the store. <br />
  12. 12. Dependent (Subordinate) Clause<br />A group of words that contains a subject and a predicate, but cannot stand alone.<br />It does not make sense on its own.<br />Whenever hedrove the car<br />
  13. 13. Phrase<br />A group of words that lacks a subject, a predicate or both.<br />Screaming like a banshee – missing a subject<br />The tallest man – missing a predicate <br />After midnight – missing both <br />
  14. 14. Fragment<br />A sentence that lacks a subject, a predicate or both and is punctuated at its end. <br />Screaming like a banshee. – missing a subject<br />The tallest man. – missing a predicate <br />After midnight. – missing both <br />
  15. 15. Appositive <br />A noun or noun phrase that describes a nearby noun or pronoun. <br />Set off by commas. <br />Mark, the smartest kid in the class, attended Harvard after high school. <br />The smartest kid in the class, Mark, attended Harvard after high school. <br />The only student to attend Harvard was Mark, the smartest kid in the class. <br />
  16. 16. Simple Sentence<br />Consists of ONE INDEPENDENT CLAUSE<br />Can have phrases <br />The boy drove to the store. <br />The woman walked along the beach.<br />Over the rainbow and through the woods to grandmother’s house we go. <br />
  17. 17. Coordinating Conjunction<br />Coordinating conjunctions join <br />single words<br />groups of words<br />always join similar elements<br />subject+subject<br />verb phrase+verb phrase<br />sentence+sentence. <br />When a coordinating conjunction is used to join elements, the element becomes a compound element.<br />FANBOYS – For, And, Nor, But, Or, Yet, So <br />
  18. 18. Subordinating Conjunction <br />The largest class of conjunctions<br />Connect subordinate clauses to a main clause. <br />These conjunctions are adverbs used as conjunctions.<br />After,how, till, although,if, unless, as, inasmuch,  until,<br />as if, in order, when,as long as, lest, whenever,<br />as much as, now that, where,as soon as, wherever,<br />as though, since,while, because, so that,before, than,<br />even if, that, even though, though<br />
  19. 19. Correlative Conjunction <br />Correlative conjunctions also connect sentence elements of the same kind (like Coordinating Conjunctions)<br />Unlike coordinating conjunctions, correlative conjunctions are always used in pairs.<br />both...and <br />not only...but also <br />either...or <br />neither...nor <br />whether...or<br />
  20. 20. Compound Sentence<br />Contains MORE THAN ONE INDEPENDENT CLAUSE<br />Contains NO DEPENDENT (SUBORDINATE) CLAUSES<br />May be linked together with <br />A SEMI-COLON ; <br />A FANBOYS Coordinating Conjunction<br />FOR, AND, NOR, BUT, OR, YET, SO <br />The boy drove to the store, and his brother stayed at home. <br />The woman walked along the beach, but Lilly drove her dune buggy. <br />She always completes her homework, so she always gets the highest grades in class. <br />
  21. 21. Complex Sentence<br />Contains an INDEPENDENT CLAUSE and one or more DEPENDENT (SUBORDINATE) CLAUSES<br />Can occur in the following order:<br />IND CLAUSE then DEP CLAUSE<br />Or<br />DEP CLAUSE then IND CLAUSE<br />Joined together by either a COORDINATING CONJUNCTION, SUBORDINATING CONJUNCTION or CORRELATIVE CONJUNCTION <br />
  22. 22. Complex Sentence Continued <br />Dependent (Sub) Clause first = USE COMMA<br />Independent Clause first = NO COMMA <br />After the boy drove to the store, he watched the football game. <br />The boy watched the football game after he drove to the store. <br />Whenever the woman walked along beach, her dog would bark uncontrollably. <br />Her dog would bark uncontrollably whenever the woman walked along the beach. <br />

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