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Gamification - making work fun, or making fun of work?

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Gamification is about understanding and influencing human behaviours in order to achieve a specific outcome. Gamification seeks to take enjoyable aspects of games - fun, play and challenge - and apply them to real-world business processes. Analysts are predicting massive growth of gamification over the next few years, but the jury is still out on whether there is any substance or evidence to back up some of the benefits being touted. This webinar will address the following questions:

Does gamification have a place as an effective business change agent?
Can gamification encourage more effective knowledge sharing behaviours and better employee engagement within and across the (your) organisation?

Published in: Business
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Gamification - making work fun, or making fun of work?

  1. 1. Stephen Dale @stephendale Unless otherwise noted, this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. www.collabor8now.com
  2. 2. The challenge for you….. • Does gamification have a place as an effective business change agent? • Can gamification encourage more effective knowledge sharing behaviours and better employee engagement within and across the/your organisation?
  3. 3. Gamification is not..... Gamification is..... The process of applying game elements to non- game applications in order to drive participation
  4. 4. Is It all Hype? Gamification source http://www.gartner.com/newsroom/id/2575515
  5. 5. Some Statistics • 80% Percent of Current Gamified Applications Will Fail to Meet Business Objectives Primarily Due to Poor Design (Source: Gartner) • Projected gamification growth to reach $5 billion ( £3 billion) by 2018 (Source: Mind Commerce) • In 2015, over 2,000 global organisations will deploy gamification applications for employee performance, healthcare, marketing and training. (Source: Gartner) • 80% of 2000 global organisations “will have gamified applications and/or processes” by 2017. (Source: Mind Commerce) • 50% of innovation practices will be gamified by 2015 (Source: Gartner) • 40% of all gamers are women (Source: Reality is Broken, Jane McGonigal) • 1 in 4 gamers is aged over 50 (Source: Reality is Broken, Jane McGonigal)
  6. 6. Gamification – potential benefits What benefits can a company hope to achieve using gamification? - Increase the motivation and productivity of their employees - Align the expectations of workers with the company’s objectives - Inform the workers of all the new initiatives of the company - Convert the workers into advocates of the company
  7. 7. For a behaviour to change you have to have a trigger, the ability to do the behaviour, and motivation. Motivation and ability are trade-offs:- Low ability requires more motivation. Low motivation means making behaviour steps really small. Overlaid motivational rewards (red and blue lines) will give the user the feeling that they're working toward something.
  8. 8. Typical components of a gamified application • Points – allocated for specific high-value behaviours and achievements • Achievements – provide positive reinforcement for high value behaviours • Levels – provide a gateway to new challenges • Missions – used to create a set of behaviours that enable users to unlock specific rewards • Contests – missions that reward those who finish most quickly or effectively • Leaderboards – introduce a sense of competition • Notifications – to encourage engagement when users perform a desired action • Anti-gaming mechanics – used to set limits on how often a behaviour can be rewarded.
  9. 9. Gamification Techniques For Online Communities Badges: Use to promote participation and reward employees and/or customers for reaching specific goals. For example, award a welcome badge for joining the community. Display earned badges on the member’s personal profile page. Points: Use to encourage engagement, collaboration and participation in online conversations. This could decrease support costs as more members look to the community for help. Campaigns. Use to encourage member participation. Track and monitor members' activities and let them know their current status, sending them information about how many points they need to achieve the next level (e.g. guru status). Leaderboards: Points could be used for building leaderboards, which can boost a member's reputation, or be used as a currency, e.g. exchanged for products, services or some other benefit.
  10. 10. Some Examples Part of a growing trend for ‘wearable technology’ that tracks and reports on daily activities, e.g. number of steps walked, number of calories burnt etc. Additional motivational incentives include comparing activity results with friends or participating in community groups challenges. Clubcards/Loyalty cards that influence shopping habits by giving rewards. Gamifiaction to help solve world hunger. FreeRice created a quiz game where each time you answered a question correctly, FreeRice will buy 10 grains of rice, which are paid for by the sponsors of the site.
  11. 11. More Examples AstraZeneca introduced a game-based learning to teach its agents about a new medicine. Users have to earn points to be the first to reach a Stadium, which represents the official launch event of the medicine. In the web game, agents can get points by answering quiz and playing different mini-games focused on the features of a new product. AZ reported a 97 percent engagement rate and 95 percent of the users completed each teaching session. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qsl9NjyVpHY SickKids needed to find a way to encourage young cancer patients to fill out detailed reports daily. Using an iPhone App they gave them some control over their pain and give doctors the tools they need to understand the experience of pain from a child's perspective.
  12. 12. Engagement Motivators Gamifying with Dr. Amy Jo Kim's Social Engagement Verbs Credit: Amy Jo Kim, Ph.D. http://amyjokim.com/2012/09/19/social-engagement-whos-playing-how-do-they-like-to-engage/
  13. 13. Extrinsic & Intrinsic Motivators Extrinsic Intrinsic Money Recognition Points/Badges/Trophies Personal Achievement Prizes Responsibility Penalties Power Quests Fun Progress bars Mastery
  14. 14. Points Mean Prizes! #Poi nts Activity 10 Post a correct answer to a question 5 Have your reply marked as a decision 5 Have someone follow you 5 Post a helpful response 3 Create a document 3 Follow another user 3 Mark something as a decision 2 Comment on an idea 2 Create a blog post 2 Create a discussion 2 Create an idea 2 Have someone ‘like’ something you’ve posted 2 Reply to a discussion 1 Attend an event 1 Vote on an idea Data extracted from the gamification module of a leading collaborative platform Valued Collaborator Badge
  15. 15. More On Intrinsic Reward Mechanisms
  16. 16. …don’t rush in... Gamification should be well understood and planned out prior to implementation. Some questions to consider asking during the planning process include: •Be sure your organisation’s goals for using gamification are clear.This is an especially important step to take before getting too deep into the effort. It is far better to determine all of the goals of a gamification programme during the beginning stages. •Think carefully about your company culture.What types of rewards will motivate employees, and how can you build out a recognition programme that ties into the prevailing culture?
  17. 17. Rewards...money isn’t everything Points could be redeemed for a day off or a team “happy hour”. Changing the rewards system periodically will ensure employees remain engaged and not get bored with the same-old options. Focus on activities first, and outcomes second. Don’t “game”the workers. Companies need to design game systems that enhance work, and not to exploit their workers.
  18. 18. Who are the players?
  19. 19. Further Reading & References • The BartleTest of Gamer Psychology: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bartle_Test • Gamifying with Dr Amy Jo Kim’s Social EngagemementVerbs: http://amyjokim.com/2012/09/19/social-engagement-whos-playing-how-do-they-like-to- engage/ • Making work fun or making fun of work: Steve Dale, Business Information Review June 2014 http://bir.sagepub.com/content/31/2/82 Play at Work: how games inspire break-through thinking. Adam L Penenberg Unlocking the power of game dynamics in business and in life. Aaron Dignon
  20. 20. Discussion:What do you think? • Does gamification have a place as an effective business change agent? • Can gamification encourage more effective knowledge sharing behaviours and better employee engagement within and across the/your organisation?
  21. 21. Unless otherwise noted, this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. Email: steve.dale@collabor8now.com Twitter: @stephendale, @collabor8now Profile: http://about.me/stephendale “I was gratified to be able to answer promptly, and I did. I said I didn’t know.” ― Mark Twain www.collabor8now.com

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