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Corporate Memory &
Personal Knowledge
Management

28 November 2013

Stephen Dale @stephendale
Unless otherwise noted, this...
What does ‘Corporate’ look like?
Pre-industrial
Age

Industrial Age

Collabor8now Ltd

Post-industrial
Age
What does ‘Corporate’ look like?
Pre-industrial
Age

Industrial Age

•Skills important
•Shared knowledge

(Worshipful Comp...
What does ‘Corporate’ look like?
Pre-industrial
Age
•Skills important
•Shared knowledge

(Worshipful Companies)
•Individua...
What does ‘Corporate’ look like?
Pre-industrial
Age
•Skills important
•Shared knowledge

(Worshipful Companies)
•Individua...
What does ‘Corporate’ look like?
Pre-industrial
Age
•Skills important
•Shared knowledge

(Worshipful Companies)
•Individua...
Is BIG Always Better?

Collabor8now Ltd
Voted the most important issue by
delegates at the Online Information
Conference 19/20 November 2013

Source: Online Infor...
Voted the most important issue by
delegates at the Online Information
Conference 19/20 November 2013

How can knowledge/
i...
Source: The evolving value of information management: www.ft.com/corporate

Collabor8now Ltd
Source: The evolving value of information management: www.ft.com/corporate

Collabor8now Ltd
The credibility gap

Source: The evolving value of information management: www.ft.com/corporate

Collabor8now Ltd
Demand for Decision-Ready
Information
People don’t have the
time to read, think
and write much, so
they will appreciate
so...
What Is Personal
Knowledge Management?

Collabor8now Ltd
What Is Personal
Knowledge Management?
It is a response to the idea
that knowledge workers
increasingly need to be
respons...
21st
Century
Literacy

Collabor8now Ltd

Source: Adapted from Dr Daniel Churchill, www.learnactivity.com
Traditional
Literacy
•Reading, writing,
speaking, listening,

21st
Century
Literacy

Collabor8now Ltd

Source: Adapted fro...
Traditional
Literacy
•Reading, writing,
speaking, listening,
Information
Literacy
•Ability to identify
what information is...
Traditional
Literacy
•Reading, writing,
speaking, listening,
Information
Literacy
•Ability to identify
what information is...
Traditional
Literacy
•Reading, writing,
speaking, listening,
Information
Literacy
•Ability to identify
what information is...
Traditional
Literacy
•Reading, writing,
speaking, listening,
Information
Literacy
•Ability to identify
what information is...
Traditional
Literacy
•Reading, writing,
speaking, listening,
Information
Literacy
•Ability to identify
what information is...
Network
Literacy
•Ability to use digital
technology,
communication tools
and networks to
locate, evaluate and
create infor...
Network
Literacy
•Ability to use digital
technology,
communication tools
and networks to
locate, evaluate and
create infor...
Build a network of
trusted sources

Share
Embed new
thinking. Curate
pertinent
information. Add
value

Personal
Knowledge
...
Build a network of
trusted sources
Share
Embed new
thinking. Curate
pertinent
information. Add
value

Personal
Knowledge
M...
Knowledge from
a trusted source
is richer than
what we can
discover for
ourselves

Photo: Flickr.com by Jackie Welberg

Co...
But who can you trust?

Collabor8now Ltd
Networks Trump Hierarchies

Everything is connected and what goes on inside your team - or even your enterprise - is
dwarf...
Networks Trump Hierarchies

Everything is connected and what goes on inside your team - or even your enterprise - is
dwarf...
(Some) Obstacles To Networking
•
•
•
•
•

•
•

People don’t know what is permissible
Knowledge is power - why would I shar...
Learning and
knowledge
acquisition is a
lifelong activity and
a far more
personalised
experience.

Collabor8now Ltd
Who owns the
knowledge?
Who owns the knowledge?
I felt that my network,
my trusted network which I
worked hard to maintain, cultivate,
I look at t...
Points to Ponder
Points to Ponder
1. What is the predominant culture in your
organisation, and does it encourage learning
and sharing?
Points to Ponder
1. What is the predominant culture in your
organisation, and does it encourage learning
and sharing?
• Au...
Points to Ponder
1. What is the predominant culture in your
organisation, and does it encourage learning
and sharing?
• Au...
Points to Ponder
1. What is the predominant culture in your
organisation, and does it encourage learning
and sharing?
• Au...
Points to Ponder
1. What is the predominant culture in your
organisation, and does it encourage learning
and sharing?
• Au...
Points to Ponder
1. What is the predominant culture in your
organisation, and does it encourage learning
and sharing?
• Au...
It’s all about thriving in networks
that are smarter and faster than you
are. It’s all about being utterly
screwed if you ...
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PKM and Corporate Memory - a dichotomy?

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A presentation for the Managing Partners’ Forum. Separating the needs of the individual and those of then organisation has always been an issue for KM and Learning. At times these needs align, sometimes they need to be reconciled and at other times they diverge, particularly when an individual moves to another organisation. The presentation looks specifically at the changing nature of organisations and the emergent power of networks and networking. Personal Knowledge Management (PKM) is a competence we must all learn in order to remain relevant to our organisation. But who ultimately “owns” the ‘corporate’ knowledge that we gather through the workplace networks we nurture and sustain, and do the organisations we work for even recognise the importance of these networks as places for continual learning, knowledge sharing and incubators for innovation?

Published in: Business, Education

PKM and Corporate Memory - a dichotomy?

  1. 1. Corporate Memory & Personal Knowledge Management 28 November 2013 Stephen Dale @stephendale Unless otherwise noted, this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
  2. 2. What does ‘Corporate’ look like? Pre-industrial Age Industrial Age Collabor8now Ltd Post-industrial Age
  3. 3. What does ‘Corporate’ look like? Pre-industrial Age Industrial Age •Skills important •Shared knowledge (Worshipful Companies) •Individualism •Close to the customer •Personalised products •Agile processes •Small is beautiful (but difficult to scale) •Transparency Collabor8now Ltd Post-industrial Age
  4. 4. What does ‘Corporate’ look like? Pre-industrial Age •Skills important •Shared knowledge (Worshipful Companies) •Individualism •Close to the customer •Personalised products •Agile processes •Small is beautiful (but difficult to scale) •Transparency Industrial Age •Mass production trumps skills •Knowledge hoarding (knowledge is power) •De-individualism •Remote from customer •One size fits all •Hard-wired processes •Big is beautiful (mega organisations) •Command and control •Hierarchies (regimented) •Opaqueness Collabor8now Ltd Post-industrial Age
  5. 5. What does ‘Corporate’ look like? Pre-industrial Age •Skills important •Shared knowledge (Worshipful Companies) •Individualism •Close to the customer •Personalised products •Agile processes •Small is beautiful (but difficult to scale) •Transparency Industrial Age •Mass production trumps skills •Knowledge hoarding (knowledge is power) •De-individualism •Remote from customer •One size fits all •Hard-wired processes •Big is beautiful (mega organisations) •Command and control •Hierarchies (regimented) •Opaqueness Collabor8now Ltd Post-industrial Age •Skills important - but routine work is automated •Shared knowledge (social/ learning networks) •Individualism •Close to customer (Social Business) •Personalised products •Agile processes •Small is beautiful (but can scale) •Democratisation of workplace •Flat structures •Transparency
  6. 6. What does ‘Corporate’ look like? Pre-industrial Age •Skills important •Shared knowledge (Worshipful Companies) •Individualism •Close to the customer •Personalised products •Agile processes •Small is beautiful (but difficult to scale) •Transparency Industrial Age •Mass production trumps skills •Knowledge hoarding (knowledge is power) •De-individualism •Remote from customer •One size fits all •Hard-wired processes •Big is beautiful (mega organisations) •Command and control •Hierarchies (regimented) •Opaqueness Similar? Collabor8now Ltd Post-industrial Age •Skills important - but routine work is automated •Shared knowledge (social/ learning networks) •Individualism •Close to customer (Social Business) •Personalised products •Agile processes •Small is beautiful (but can scale) •Democratisation of workplace •Flat structures •Transparency
  7. 7. Is BIG Always Better? Collabor8now Ltd
  8. 8. Voted the most important issue by delegates at the Online Information Conference 19/20 November 2013 Source: Online Information Show : http://www.online-information.co.uk/
  9. 9. Voted the most important issue by delegates at the Online Information Conference 19/20 November 2013 How can knowledge/ information professionals demonstrate value to their organisation? Source: Online Information Show : http://www.online-information.co.uk/
  10. 10. Source: The evolving value of information management: www.ft.com/corporate Collabor8now Ltd
  11. 11. Source: The evolving value of information management: www.ft.com/corporate Collabor8now Ltd
  12. 12. The credibility gap Source: The evolving value of information management: www.ft.com/corporate Collabor8now Ltd
  13. 13. Demand for Decision-Ready Information People don’t have the time to read, think and write much, so they will appreciate someone who has a good feeling for what they want and need and can give it to them effectively. Collabor8now Ltd
  14. 14. What Is Personal Knowledge Management? Collabor8now Ltd
  15. 15. What Is Personal Knowledge Management? It is a response to the idea that knowledge workers increasingly need to be responsible for their own growth and learning. Collabor8now Ltd
  16. 16. 21st Century Literacy Collabor8now Ltd Source: Adapted from Dr Daniel Churchill, www.learnactivity.com
  17. 17. Traditional Literacy •Reading, writing, speaking, listening, 21st Century Literacy Collabor8now Ltd Source: Adapted from Dr Daniel Churchill, www.learnactivity.com
  18. 18. Traditional Literacy •Reading, writing, speaking, listening, Information Literacy •Ability to identify what information is needed and the ability to locate, evaluate and use information 21st Century Literacy Collabor8now Ltd Source: Adapted from Dr Daniel Churchill, www.learnactivity.com
  19. 19. Traditional Literacy •Reading, writing, speaking, listening, Information Literacy •Ability to identify what information is needed and the ability to locate, evaluate and use information 21st Century Literacy Visual Literacy •Ability to understand and produce visual messages Collabor8now Ltd Source: Adapted from Dr Daniel Churchill, www.learnactivity.com
  20. 20. Traditional Literacy •Reading, writing, speaking, listening, Information Literacy •Ability to identify what information is needed and the ability to locate, evaluate and use information 21st Century Literacy Visual Literacy •Ability to understand and produce visual messages Critical Literacy •Ability to question, challenge and evaluate the meanings and purposes of texts Collabor8now Ltd Source: Adapted from Dr Daniel Churchill, www.learnactivity.com
  21. 21. Traditional Literacy •Reading, writing, speaking, listening, Information Literacy •Ability to identify what information is needed and the ability to locate, evaluate and use information 21st Century Literacy Media Literacy •Ability to question, analyse, interpret, evaluate and create media messages Visual Literacy •Ability to understand and produce visual messages Critical Literacy •Ability to question, challenge and evaluate the meanings and purposes of texts Collabor8now Ltd Source: Adapted from Dr Daniel Churchill, www.learnactivity.com
  22. 22. Traditional Literacy •Reading, writing, speaking, listening, Information Literacy •Ability to identify what information is needed and the ability to locate, evaluate and use information Tool Literacy •Ability to use tools to manage, consume and create information 21st Century Literacy Media Literacy •Ability to question, analyse, interpret, evaluate and create media messages Visual Literacy •Ability to understand and produce visual messages Critical Literacy •Ability to question, challenge and evaluate the meanings and purposes of texts Collabor8now Ltd Source: Adapted from Dr Daniel Churchill, www.learnactivity.com
  23. 23. Network Literacy •Ability to use digital technology, communication tools and networks to locate, evaluate and create information Tool Literacy •Ability to use tools to manage, consume and create information Traditional Literacy •Reading, writing, speaking, listening, Information Literacy •Ability to identify what information is needed and the ability to locate, evaluate and use information 21st Century Literacy Media Literacy •Ability to question, analyse, interpret, evaluate and create media messages Visual Literacy •Ability to understand and produce visual messages Critical Literacy •Ability to question, challenge and evaluate the meanings and purposes of texts Collabor8now Ltd Source: Adapted from Dr Daniel Churchill, www.learnactivity.com
  24. 24. Network Literacy •Ability to use digital technology, communication tools and networks to locate, evaluate and create information Tool Literacy •Ability to use tools to manage, consume and create information Traditional Literacy •Reading, writing, speaking, listening, Information Literacy •Ability to identify what information is needed and the ability to locate, evaluate and use information 21st Century Literacy Media Literacy •Ability to question, analyse, interpret, evaluate and create media messages Visual Literacy •Ability to understand and produce visual messages Critical Literacy •Ability to question, challenge and evaluate the meanings and purposes of texts Collabor8now Ltd Source: Adapted from Dr Daniel Churchill, www.learnactivity.com
  25. 25. Build a network of trusted sources Share Embed new thinking. Curate pertinent information. Add value Personal Knowledge Management Sense Collabor8now Ltd Source: Seek-Sense-Share model by Harold Jarche Find/filter relevant information. Map people and conversations Sense Sense Engage with experts, peers, colleagues. Gain insights. Seek Assemble, synthesize and evaluate information. Test assumptions
  26. 26. Build a network of trusted sources Share Embed new thinking. Curate pertinent information. Add value Personal Knowledge Management Sense Collabor8now Ltd Source: Seek-Sense-Share model by Harold Jarche Find/filter relevant information. Map people and conversations Sense Sense Engage with experts, peers, colleagues. Gain insights. Seek Assemble, synthesize and evaluate information. Test assumptions
  27. 27. Knowledge from a trusted source is richer than what we can discover for ourselves Photo: Flickr.com by Jackie Welberg Collabor8now Ltd
  28. 28. But who can you trust? Collabor8now Ltd
  29. 29. Networks Trump Hierarchies Everything is connected and what goes on inside your team - or even your enterprise - is dwarfed by what goes on outside.  We can no longer pretend that organisation charts and diagrams amount to anything more than wish lists.  In a connected world, things have a way of self organising.
  30. 30. Networks Trump Hierarchies Everything is connected and what goes on inside your team - or even your enterprise - is dwarfed by what goes on outside.  We can no longer pretend that organisation charts and diagrams amount to anything more than wish lists.  In a connected world, things have a way of self organising.
  31. 31. (Some) Obstacles To Networking • • • • • • • People don’t know what is permissible Knowledge is power - why would I share? Fear of imperfection People don’t know where to participate People don’t know how to participate • • • What’s my role? Who can I speak to? What am I allowed to say? Paternal culture and work-style Lack of trust in employee judgement Collabor8now Ltd
  32. 32. Learning and knowledge acquisition is a lifelong activity and a far more personalised experience. Collabor8now Ltd
  33. 33. Who owns the knowledge?
  34. 34. Who owns the knowledge? I felt that my network, my trusted network which I worked hard to maintain, cultivate, I look at the culture of nurture, trust and grow was going to be the organisation. If there is a exploited by other individuals within the genuine, authentic opportunity to organisation who saw me as their share and learn and be respectful of each ‘free ride’ to some quick other’s networks then I have no problem. If answers. it is mandated, or if my networks are used, misused or discounted, then I’d question why I’m even working there. For the time being, I will nurture and maintain my networks but I will be cautious in how mine are used within my organisation and for what purpose. But I’m the one who decides that. Helen Blunden Source: http://activatelearning.com.au/2013/11/reflections-of-exploring-personal-learning-networks-mooc/
  35. 35. Points to Ponder
  36. 36. Points to Ponder 1. What is the predominant culture in your organisation, and does it encourage learning and sharing?
  37. 37. Points to Ponder 1. What is the predominant culture in your organisation, and does it encourage learning and sharing? • Autocratic - We’ll do it this way
  38. 38. Points to Ponder 1. What is the predominant culture in your organisation, and does it encourage learning and sharing? • Autocratic - We’ll do it this way • Bureaucratic - We’re supposed to do it this way
  39. 39. Points to Ponder 1. What is the predominant culture in your organisation, and does it encourage learning and sharing? • Autocratic - We’ll do it this way • Bureaucratic - We’re supposed to do it this way • Technocratic - It’s best to do it this way
  40. 40. Points to Ponder 1. What is the predominant culture in your organisation, and does it encourage learning and sharing? • Autocratic - We’ll do it this way • Bureaucratic - We’re supposed to do it this way • Technocratic - It’s best to do it this way • Democratic - How shall we do it?
  41. 41. Points to Ponder 1. What is the predominant culture in your organisation, and does it encourage learning and sharing? • Autocratic - We’ll do it this way • Bureaucratic - We’re supposed to do it this way • Technocratic - It’s best to do it this way • Democratic - How shall we do it? 2. Is Personal Knowledge (knowledge gained in the workplace) the same as Corporate Knowledge?
  42. 42. It’s all about thriving in networks that are smarter and faster than you are. It’s all about being utterly screwed if you don’t know what I’m talking about. Hugh MacLeod Steve Dale @stephendale steve.dale@collabor8now.com Unless otherwise noted, this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

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