SlideShare a Scribd company logo
Principles of lending
Principle of lending
• The business of lending, which is main
business of the banks, carry certain inherent
risks and bank cannot take more than
calculated risk
• whenever it wants to lend. Hence, lending
activity has to necessarily adhere to certain
principles.
• Lending principles can be conveniently divided
into two areas (i) activity, and (ii) individual.
lending
Activity
liquidity
diversity stability profitability
safety
individual
Security
Appraisal
5 ‘C’s of
the
borrower
Process
of
Lending
liquidity
• Liquidity is an important principle of bank lending. Bank
lend for short period only because they lend public
money which can be withdrawn at any time by
depositors.
• They therefore advances loans on security of such assets
which are easily marketable and convertible into the
cash at short notice.
• A bank chooses such securities in its investment
portfolio which possess sufficient liquidity. It is essential
because if the bank needs cash to meet the urgent
requirement of its customers, it should be in position to
sell some of the securities at a very short notice without
disturbing their market prices much.
• There are certain securities such as central, states and
local govt. bonds which are easily saleable without
affecting the price of market
safety
• The safety of funds lent is another principle of
lending.
• Safety means that the borrower should be able to
repay the loan and interest in time at regular
intervals without default.
• The repayment of the loan depend upon the
nature of the security, character of the borrower,
his capacity to repay and his financial standing.
• Like other investment bank investments involves
risk but the degree of risk varies with the type of
the securities of the central govt. are safer than
those of the state govt. and local bodies.
diversity
• In choosing its investment portfolio a commercial
bank should follow the principle of diversity.
• It should not invest its surplus funds in a particular
type of securities. It should choose the shares and
debentures of different types of industries
situated in different regions of the country. The
same principle should be followed in the case of
state govt. and local bodies.
• Its aim at minimizing risk of the investment
portfolio of a bank. it also applies to the advancing
of loans to varied types of firms, industry,
business and trades.
• “ Do not keep all eggs in one basket ”
stability
• Another important principle of bank’s investment policy
should be to invest in those stocks and securities which
possess a high degree of stability in their price.
• The bank cannot afford any loss on the value of its securities.
It should therefore invest it funds in the shares of reputed
companies where the possibility of decline in their prices is
remote. Govt. bonds and debentures of companies carry
fixed rates of interest.
• Their value change with change in the market rate of interest.
But the bank is forced to liquidate a portion of them to meet
its requirement of cash in cash of financial crisis.
• Otherwise they run to their full term of 10 years or more and
change in the market rate of interest do not affect them
much. Thus banks investments in debentures and bonds are
more stable than in the shares of the companies.
profitability
• This is the cardinal principle for making investment by a
bank. Its must earn sufficient profits.
• It should therefore invest in such securities which was
sure a fair and stable return on the funds invested.
• The earning capacity of securities and share depends
upon the interest rate and the dividend rate and the tax
benefits they carry.
• It is largely the govt. securities of the centre, state and
local bodies that largely carry the exemptions of their
interest from taxes.
• The bank should invest more in such securities rather
than in the shares of new companies which also carry tax
exemption. This is because shares of new companies are
not the safe investment.
Secured Advances
• Cardinal principle of sound banking is to ensure
safety of funds lent by banker to his customers.
• The banker therefore relies on primarily on the
3 C’s of borrower.
• Secured advances are those advances which
provide absolute safety to the banker in means
of charge created on the tangible assets of the
borrower in favor of the banker.
Modes of creating charge :
Lien
• Section 171 of the Indian Contract Act confers
the right of general lien on the banker.
• The banker is empowered to secure all securities
of the customers, in result of the general balance
due from him.
• The ownership of stock securing is not
transferred from the customer to the banker.
Negative Lien
• The borrower gives a declaration to the banker
that his assets mentioned therein are free from
any charge or encumbrance.
• He also gives an undertaking that he shall not
create any charge or dispose them off without
permission of the banker.
• The borrower cannot dispose of the assets or
create any charge there on without the consent
of the banker.
PLEDGE
• Sec. 172 of the Indian Contract Act – 1872 defines pledge
as ‘bailment of goods as security for payment of debt or
performance of a promise.
• Pledge is used when the lender (pledgee) takes actual
possession of assets (i.e. certificates, goods ). Such securities or
goods are movable securities. In this case the pledgee retains
the possession of the goods until the pledgor (i.e. borrower)
repays the entire debt amount. In case there is default by the
borrower, the pledgee has a right to sell the goods in his
possession and adjust its proceeds towards the amount due (i.e.
principal and interest amount). Some examples of pledge are
Gold /Jewellery Loans, Advance against goods,/stock, Advances
against National Saving Certificates etc.
• The person who offer security is called – PLEDGER
• To whom it is offered is called – PLEDGEE
HYPOTHECATION :
• It is used for creating charge against the security of movable assets, but
here the possession of the security remains with the borrower itself.
• Thus, in case of default by the borrower, the lender (i.e. to whom the
goods / security has been hypothecated) will have to first take
possession of the security and then sell the same.
• The best example of this type of arrangement are Car Loans. In this case
Car / Vehicle remains with the borrower but the same is hypothecated
to the bank / financer.
• In case the borrower, defaults, banks take possession of the vehicle
after giving notice and then sell the same and credit the proceeds to the
loan account.
• Other examples of these hypothecation are loans against stock and
debtors. [Sometimes, borrowers cheat the banker by partly selling
goods hypothecated to bank and not keeping the desired amount of
stock of goods.
• In such cases, if bank feels that borrower is trying to cheat, then it can
convert hypothecation to pledge i.e. it takes over possession of the
goods and keeps the same under lock and key of the bank].
MORTGAGE :
• Sec. 58 of the transfer of property Act 1882 defines
mortgage as –
• It is used for creating charge against immovable property which
includes land, buildings or anything that is attached to the earth
or permanently fastened to anything attached to the earth
(However, it does not include growing crops or grass as they can
be easily detached from the earth).
• The best example when mortage is created is when someone
takes a Housing Loan / Home Loan. In this case house is
mortgaged in favour of the bank / financer but remains in
possession of the borrower, which he uses for himself or even
may give on rent.
• In this case transfer is called “MORTGAGOR”
• Transferee is called – “MORTGAGEE”
• Principle money & Int. thereon is called – “MORTGAGE MONEY”
• Instrument is called – “MORTGAGE DEED”.
• Simple Mortgage
• Mortgage by condition sale
• English Mortgage
• Mortgage by deposit of title deed or equitable
mortgage
• Anomalous mortgage
Forms of mortgage
Difference Between Pledge, Hypothecation and
Mortgage
Pledge Hypothecation Mortgage
Type of Security Movable Movable Immovable
Possession of the
security
Remains with lender
(pledgee)
Remains with
Borrower
Usually Remains with
Borrower
Examples of Loan
where used
Gold Loan, Advance
against NSCs, Adv
against goods (also
given under
hypothecation)
Car / Vehilce Loans,
Adv against stock and
debtors
Housing Loans
Priority Sector
• Priority sector refers to those sectors of the
economy which may not get timely and
adequate credit in the absence of this special
dispensation.
• Typically, these are small value loans to
farmers for agriculture and allied activities,
micro and small enterprises, poor people for
housing, students for education and other low
income groups and weaker sections.
Categories under priority sector
• (i) Agriculture
• (ii) Micro and Small Enterprises
• (iii) Education
• (iv) Housing
• (v) Export Credit
• (vi) Others
Targets and Sub-targets for banks
under priority sector
Categories Domestic commercial banks /
Foreign banks with 20 and above
branches (As percent of ANBC or
Credit Equivalent of Off-Balance
Sheet Exposure, whichever is
higher)
Foreign banks with less
than 20 branches (As
percent of ANBC or Credit
Equivalent of Off-Balance
Sheet Exposure, whichever
is higher)
Total Priority Sector 40 32
Total agriculture 18 No specific target.
Advances to Weaker
Sections
10 No specific target.
'Direct Finance' for Agricultural
Purposes
(i) Loans to individual farmers [including Self Help Groups (SHGs) or
Joint Liability Groups (JLGs), i.e. groups of individual farmers]
engaged in Agriculture and Allied Activities, viz., dairy, fishery,
animal husbandry, poultry, bee-keeping and sericulture.
(ii) Loans to corporate including farmers' producer companies of
individual farmers, partnership firms and co-operatives of farmers
directly engaged in Agriculture and Allied Activities, viz., dairy,
fishery, animal husbandry, poultry, bee-keeping and sericultureup to
an aggregate limit of `2 crore per borrower.
(iii) Loans to small and marginal farmers for purchase of land for
agricultural purposes.
(iv) Loans to distressed farmers indebted to non-institutional lenders.
(v) Bank loans to Primary Agricultural Credit Societies (PACS),
Farmers’ Service Societies (FSS) and Large-sized Adivasi Multi
Purpose Societies (LAMPS) ceded to or managed/ controlled by
such banks for on lending to farmers for agricultural and allied
activities.
'Indirect Finance' to Agriculture
(i) If the aggregate loan limit per borrower is more than
`2 crore in respect of para. (4) (ii) above, the entire
loan will be treated as indirect finance to agriculture.
(ii) Loans upto `5 crore to Producer Companies set up
exclusively by only small and marginal farmers under
Part IXA of Companies Act, 1956 for agricultural and
allied activities.
(iii) Bank loans to Primary Agricultural Credit Societies
(PACS), Farmers’ Service Societies (FSS) and Large-sized
Adivasi Multi Purpose Societies (LAMPS).
Micro and Small Enterprises under
priority sector
• Bank loans to Micro and Small Manufacturing
and Service Enterprises, provided these units
satisfy the criteria for investment in plant
machinery/equipment as per MSMED Act
2006.
Manufacturing sector
Enterprises Investment in plant and machinery
Micro Enterprises Do not exceed twenty five lakh rupees
Small Enterprises More than twenty fivelakh rupees but does not
exceed five crore rupees
Enterprises Investment in equipment
Micro Enterprises Does not exceed ten lakh rupees
Small Enterprises More than ten lakh rupees but does not exceed two
crore rupees
Loan limit for education under priority
sector
• Loans to individuals for educational purposes
including vocational courses upto `10 lakh for
studies in India and `20 lakh for studies abroad
are included under priority sector.
limit for housing loans under priority
sector
• Loans to individuals up to `25 lakh in
metropolitan centres with population above
ten lakh and `15 lakh in other centres for
purchase/construction of a dwelling unit per
family excluding loans sanctioned to bank’s
own employees.
under Weaker Sections under priority
sector
• Priority sector loans to the following borrowers are considered under Weaker
Sections category:-
(a) Small and marginal farmers;
(b) Artisans, village and cottage industries where individual credit limits do not
exceed `50,000;
(c) Beneficiaries of Swarnjayanti Gram Swarozgar Yojana (SGSY), now National
Rural Livelihood Mission (NRLM);
(d) Scheduled Castes and Scheduled Tribes;
(e) Beneficiaries of Differential Rate of Interest (DRI) scheme;
(f) Beneficiaries under Swarna Jayanti Shahari Rozgar Yojana (SJSRY);
(g) Beneficiaries under the Scheme for Rehabilitation of Manual Scavengers
(SRMS);
(h) Loans to Self Help Groups;
• (i) Loans to distressed farmers indebted to non-institutional lenders;
• (j) Loans to distressed persons other than farmers not exceeding `50,000 per
borrower to prepay their debt to non-institutional lenders;
• (k) Loans to individual women beneficiaries upto `50,000 per borrower;
The rate of interest for loans under
priority sector
• The rate of interest on various priority sector
loans will be as per RBI’s directives issued
from time to time, which is linked to Base Rate
of banks at present. Priority sector guidelines
do not lay down any preferential rate of
interest for priority sector loans
Principle of lending
Principle of lending

More Related Content

What's hot

Negotiable Instruments Act, 1881
Negotiable Instruments Act, 1881Negotiable Instruments Act, 1881
Negotiable Instruments Act, 1881
AJAY NATH DUBEY
 
Fund based financial s ervices
Fund based financial s ervicesFund based financial s ervices
Fund based financial s ervices
sataydeepthi
 
Functions of RBI
Functions of RBIFunctions of RBI
Functions of RBI
Omkar Kumbar
 
SARFAESI Act, 2002
SARFAESI Act, 2002SARFAESI Act, 2002
SARFAESI Act, 2002
Suhail Muzafar
 
Money market
Money marketMoney market
Money market
Utkarsh Bisht
 
Consumer finance ppt
Consumer finance pptConsumer finance ppt
Consumer finance ppt
Rahul Mailcontractor
 
Paying banker
Paying bankerPaying banker
Paying banker
ramandeepjrf
 
Financial services
Financial servicesFinancial services
Financial services
Visakhapatnam
 
Sebi
SebiSebi
Securitization
Securitization Securitization
Securitization
Rohit Kumar
 
Modes of Charging Security
Modes of Charging SecurityModes of Charging Security
Modes of Charging Security
Jubayer Alam Shoikat
 
Security &advances ppt
Security &advances pptSecurity &advances ppt
Security &advances ppt
sukhpal0015
 
Bank, Banker and Banking
Bank, Banker and BankingBank, Banker and Banking
Bank, Banker and Banking
Dr. S. Bulomine Regi
 
INSURANCE REGULATORY DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY
INSURANCE REGULATORY DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITYINSURANCE REGULATORY DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY
INSURANCE REGULATORY DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY
BHANU DIXIT
 
Exim bank of india
Exim bank of indiaExim bank of india
Exim bank of india
ginnyssharma
 
Regulation of Merchant banking
Regulation of Merchant bankingRegulation of Merchant banking
Regulation of Merchant banking
mahesh patil
 
Factors affecting dividend policy
Factors affecting dividend policyFactors affecting dividend policy
Factors affecting dividend policy
Sharon Mansoor
 
Underwriting
Underwriting Underwriting
Underwriting
ashvi1011
 
Sarfaesi Act
Sarfaesi ActSarfaesi Act
Sarfaesi Act
sreejithjkurup
 
IRDA
IRDAIRDA

What's hot (20)

Negotiable Instruments Act, 1881
Negotiable Instruments Act, 1881Negotiable Instruments Act, 1881
Negotiable Instruments Act, 1881
 
Fund based financial s ervices
Fund based financial s ervicesFund based financial s ervices
Fund based financial s ervices
 
Functions of RBI
Functions of RBIFunctions of RBI
Functions of RBI
 
SARFAESI Act, 2002
SARFAESI Act, 2002SARFAESI Act, 2002
SARFAESI Act, 2002
 
Money market
Money marketMoney market
Money market
 
Consumer finance ppt
Consumer finance pptConsumer finance ppt
Consumer finance ppt
 
Paying banker
Paying bankerPaying banker
Paying banker
 
Financial services
Financial servicesFinancial services
Financial services
 
Sebi
SebiSebi
Sebi
 
Securitization
Securitization Securitization
Securitization
 
Modes of Charging Security
Modes of Charging SecurityModes of Charging Security
Modes of Charging Security
 
Security &advances ppt
Security &advances pptSecurity &advances ppt
Security &advances ppt
 
Bank, Banker and Banking
Bank, Banker and BankingBank, Banker and Banking
Bank, Banker and Banking
 
INSURANCE REGULATORY DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY
INSURANCE REGULATORY DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITYINSURANCE REGULATORY DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY
INSURANCE REGULATORY DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY
 
Exim bank of india
Exim bank of indiaExim bank of india
Exim bank of india
 
Regulation of Merchant banking
Regulation of Merchant bankingRegulation of Merchant banking
Regulation of Merchant banking
 
Factors affecting dividend policy
Factors affecting dividend policyFactors affecting dividend policy
Factors affecting dividend policy
 
Underwriting
Underwriting Underwriting
Underwriting
 
Sarfaesi Act
Sarfaesi ActSarfaesi Act
Sarfaesi Act
 
IRDA
IRDAIRDA
IRDA
 

Viewers also liked

Bank lendings and loans ppt
Bank lendings and loans pptBank lendings and loans ppt
Bank lendings and loans ppt
Titiksha Chaturvedi
 
Types of bank customers
Types of bank customersTypes of bank customers
Types of bank customers
Abinash Mandilwar
 
Principles of bank lending
Principles of bank lendingPrinciples of bank lending
Principles of bank lending
Devang Sadrani
 
Types of banks
Types of banksTypes of banks
Types of banks
17somya
 
credit management
credit managementcredit management
credit management
FaFa Ieda
 
Forms of lending
Forms of lendingForms of lending
Forms of lending
AsHra ReHmat
 
Role of Commercial Banks in India
Role of Commercial Banks in IndiaRole of Commercial Banks in India
Role of Commercial Banks in India
Visakhapatnam
 
How to assess working capital requirement
How to assess working capital requirementHow to assess working capital requirement
How to assess working capital requirement
fincon solutions(p) ltd.
 
Working capital assessment PPT
Working capital assessment PPTWorking capital assessment PPT
Working capital assessment PPT
sahaarijit1
 
Bank deposits
Bank depositsBank deposits
Bank deposits
Anjali Jalan
 
Role of irda
Role of irdaRole of irda
Role of irda
Pranavkumar Jain
 
Deposits
DepositsDeposits
Deposits
Joji Isac P
 
Banking product and services
Banking product and servicesBanking product and services
Banking product and services
Pradyumna Kumar
 
Banker and Customer Relationship
Banker and Customer RelationshipBanker and Customer Relationship
Banker and Customer Relationship
Visakhapatnam
 
Priority sector lending
Priority sector lendingPriority sector lending
Priority sector lending
Vishal Kapoor
 
Reserve Bank Of India : Role ,Functions Structure and Management
Reserve Bank Of India : Role ,Functions Structure and ManagementReserve Bank Of India : Role ,Functions Structure and Management
Reserve Bank Of India : Role ,Functions Structure and Management
Binto Mathachan
 
Banking regulation act
Banking regulation actBanking regulation act
Banking regulation act
Sandeep K Bohra
 
Banking regulation act.
Banking regulation act.Banking regulation act.
Banking regulation act.
ratneshkumarsrm
 
Retail banking ppt
Retail banking pptRetail banking ppt
Retail banking ppt
Amit Saini
 
Credit appraisal in banking sbi
Credit appraisal in banking sbi Credit appraisal in banking sbi
Credit appraisal in banking sbi
Babasab Patil
 

Viewers also liked (20)

Bank lendings and loans ppt
Bank lendings and loans pptBank lendings and loans ppt
Bank lendings and loans ppt
 
Types of bank customers
Types of bank customersTypes of bank customers
Types of bank customers
 
Principles of bank lending
Principles of bank lendingPrinciples of bank lending
Principles of bank lending
 
Types of banks
Types of banksTypes of banks
Types of banks
 
credit management
credit managementcredit management
credit management
 
Forms of lending
Forms of lendingForms of lending
Forms of lending
 
Role of Commercial Banks in India
Role of Commercial Banks in IndiaRole of Commercial Banks in India
Role of Commercial Banks in India
 
How to assess working capital requirement
How to assess working capital requirementHow to assess working capital requirement
How to assess working capital requirement
 
Working capital assessment PPT
Working capital assessment PPTWorking capital assessment PPT
Working capital assessment PPT
 
Bank deposits
Bank depositsBank deposits
Bank deposits
 
Role of irda
Role of irdaRole of irda
Role of irda
 
Deposits
DepositsDeposits
Deposits
 
Banking product and services
Banking product and servicesBanking product and services
Banking product and services
 
Banker and Customer Relationship
Banker and Customer RelationshipBanker and Customer Relationship
Banker and Customer Relationship
 
Priority sector lending
Priority sector lendingPriority sector lending
Priority sector lending
 
Reserve Bank Of India : Role ,Functions Structure and Management
Reserve Bank Of India : Role ,Functions Structure and ManagementReserve Bank Of India : Role ,Functions Structure and Management
Reserve Bank Of India : Role ,Functions Structure and Management
 
Banking regulation act
Banking regulation actBanking regulation act
Banking regulation act
 
Banking regulation act.
Banking regulation act.Banking regulation act.
Banking regulation act.
 
Retail banking ppt
Retail banking pptRetail banking ppt
Retail banking ppt
 
Credit appraisal in banking sbi
Credit appraisal in banking sbi Credit appraisal in banking sbi
Credit appraisal in banking sbi
 

Similar to Principle of lending

A.loans & advances
A.loans & advancesA.loans & advances
A.loans & advances
Ronak Karanpuria
 
Banking financial service management
Banking financial service managementBanking financial service management
Banking financial service management
Jothi Ram
 
Principle & Forms of Lending (USAMA 224).pptx
Principle & Forms of Lending (USAMA 224).pptxPrinciple & Forms of Lending (USAMA 224).pptx
Principle & Forms of Lending (USAMA 224).pptx
MuhammadKashif584561
 
Unit_6_Banking_Products.pptx
Unit_6_Banking_Products.pptxUnit_6_Banking_Products.pptx
Unit_6_Banking_Products.pptx
kiranroy6777
 
29714464 corporate-banking-updated2
29714464 corporate-banking-updated229714464 corporate-banking-updated2
29714464 corporate-banking-updated2
Ashish Chopra
 
Lending Principles In Commercial Banking.ppt
Lending Principles In Commercial Banking.pptLending Principles In Commercial Banking.ppt
Lending Principles In Commercial Banking.ppt
etebarkhmichale
 
Hansika saxena ppt on Financial sector.pptx
Hansika saxena ppt on Financial sector.pptxHansika saxena ppt on Financial sector.pptx
Hansika saxena ppt on Financial sector.pptx
RitikBorkar1
 
Deposit_and_Investment_Products_in_Islam.pptx
Deposit_and_Investment_Products_in_Islam.pptxDeposit_and_Investment_Products_in_Islam.pptx
Deposit_and_Investment_Products_in_Islam.pptx
English1013
 
Introduction to investment.pptx
Introduction to investment.pptxIntroduction to investment.pptx
Introduction to investment.pptx
DerejeUrgecha1
 
Financial Assets: Debit vs Equity Securities.pptx
Financial Assets: Debit vs Equity Securities.pptxFinancial Assets: Debit vs Equity Securities.pptx
Financial Assets: Debit vs Equity Securities.pptx
Writo-Finance
 
UNIT-2 Sources of Finance.pdf
UNIT-2 Sources of Finance.pdfUNIT-2 Sources of Finance.pdf
UNIT-2 Sources of Finance.pdf
DrAyushiMayurSharma
 
Unit 5- Financial Services
Unit 5- Financial ServicesUnit 5- Financial Services
Unit 5- Financial Services
PRAVEEN B
 
Bank and Customer.pptx
Bank and Customer.pptxBank and Customer.pptx
Bank and Customer.pptx
ShivaniSati5
 
9 Mortgage MarketsCHAPTER OBJECTIVESThe specific objectives of.docx
9 Mortgage MarketsCHAPTER OBJECTIVESThe specific objectives of.docx9 Mortgage MarketsCHAPTER OBJECTIVESThe specific objectives of.docx
9 Mortgage MarketsCHAPTER OBJECTIVESThe specific objectives of.docx
blondellchancy
 
Banking operations
Banking operationsBanking operations
Banking operations
Swadha Mishra
 
Loans and it's types
Loans and it's typesLoans and it's types
Loans and it's types
Sudhanshu Ranjan
 
Asset backed financing
Asset backed financingAsset backed financing
Asset backed financing
himanshujaiswal
 
Unit 2 Part 1.pdf
Unit 2 Part 1.pdfUnit 2 Part 1.pdf
Unit 2 Part 1.pdf
vijayshet3
 
BRANCH BANKING
BRANCH BANKINGBRANCH BANKING
BRANCH BANKING
Noor ul basar khan
 
BRANCH BANKING
BRANCH BANKINGBRANCH BANKING
BRANCH BANKING
Noor ul basar khan
 

Similar to Principle of lending (20)

A.loans & advances
A.loans & advancesA.loans & advances
A.loans & advances
 
Banking financial service management
Banking financial service managementBanking financial service management
Banking financial service management
 
Principle & Forms of Lending (USAMA 224).pptx
Principle & Forms of Lending (USAMA 224).pptxPrinciple & Forms of Lending (USAMA 224).pptx
Principle & Forms of Lending (USAMA 224).pptx
 
Unit_6_Banking_Products.pptx
Unit_6_Banking_Products.pptxUnit_6_Banking_Products.pptx
Unit_6_Banking_Products.pptx
 
29714464 corporate-banking-updated2
29714464 corporate-banking-updated229714464 corporate-banking-updated2
29714464 corporate-banking-updated2
 
Lending Principles In Commercial Banking.ppt
Lending Principles In Commercial Banking.pptLending Principles In Commercial Banking.ppt
Lending Principles In Commercial Banking.ppt
 
Hansika saxena ppt on Financial sector.pptx
Hansika saxena ppt on Financial sector.pptxHansika saxena ppt on Financial sector.pptx
Hansika saxena ppt on Financial sector.pptx
 
Deposit_and_Investment_Products_in_Islam.pptx
Deposit_and_Investment_Products_in_Islam.pptxDeposit_and_Investment_Products_in_Islam.pptx
Deposit_and_Investment_Products_in_Islam.pptx
 
Introduction to investment.pptx
Introduction to investment.pptxIntroduction to investment.pptx
Introduction to investment.pptx
 
Financial Assets: Debit vs Equity Securities.pptx
Financial Assets: Debit vs Equity Securities.pptxFinancial Assets: Debit vs Equity Securities.pptx
Financial Assets: Debit vs Equity Securities.pptx
 
UNIT-2 Sources of Finance.pdf
UNIT-2 Sources of Finance.pdfUNIT-2 Sources of Finance.pdf
UNIT-2 Sources of Finance.pdf
 
Unit 5- Financial Services
Unit 5- Financial ServicesUnit 5- Financial Services
Unit 5- Financial Services
 
Bank and Customer.pptx
Bank and Customer.pptxBank and Customer.pptx
Bank and Customer.pptx
 
9 Mortgage MarketsCHAPTER OBJECTIVESThe specific objectives of.docx
9 Mortgage MarketsCHAPTER OBJECTIVESThe specific objectives of.docx9 Mortgage MarketsCHAPTER OBJECTIVESThe specific objectives of.docx
9 Mortgage MarketsCHAPTER OBJECTIVESThe specific objectives of.docx
 
Banking operations
Banking operationsBanking operations
Banking operations
 
Loans and it's types
Loans and it's typesLoans and it's types
Loans and it's types
 
Asset backed financing
Asset backed financingAsset backed financing
Asset backed financing
 
Unit 2 Part 1.pdf
Unit 2 Part 1.pdfUnit 2 Part 1.pdf
Unit 2 Part 1.pdf
 
BRANCH BANKING
BRANCH BANKINGBRANCH BANKING
BRANCH BANKING
 
BRANCH BANKING
BRANCH BANKINGBRANCH BANKING
BRANCH BANKING
 

Recently uploaded

OAT_RI_Ep21 WeighingTheRisks_June24_CommodityInflation.pptx
OAT_RI_Ep21 WeighingTheRisks_June24_CommodityInflation.pptxOAT_RI_Ep21 WeighingTheRisks_June24_CommodityInflation.pptx
OAT_RI_Ep21 WeighingTheRisks_June24_CommodityInflation.pptx
hiddenlevers
 
UCSC diploma, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore degree
UCSC diploma, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore degreeUCSC diploma, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore degree
UCSC diploma, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore degree
GlethDanold
 
The Growth Story An Overview - India. .pptx
The Growth Story An Overview  - India. .pptxThe Growth Story An Overview  - India. .pptx
The Growth Story An Overview - India. .pptx
RakeshBaptista1
 
‘Not afraid to die’ Kenya tax protests inspire broader demand for change.pdf
‘Not afraid to die’ Kenya tax protests inspire broader demand for change.pdf‘Not afraid to die’ Kenya tax protests inspire broader demand for change.pdf
‘Not afraid to die’ Kenya tax protests inspire broader demand for change.pdf
John Leonardo
 
ppt on Review of literature 1720335948098.pptx
ppt on Review of literature 1720335948098.pptxppt on Review of literature 1720335948098.pptx
ppt on Review of literature 1720335948098.pptx
coolpool363
 
05 BBA 20 23 Sem IV POM Forecasting Methods.pptx
05 BBA 20 23 Sem IV  POM Forecasting Methods.pptx05 BBA 20 23 Sem IV  POM Forecasting Methods.pptx
05 BBA 20 23 Sem IV POM Forecasting Methods.pptx
drsouravpanda27
 
GUIA_LEGAL_CHAPTER-13_ACCOUNTING REGULATION.pdf
GUIA_LEGAL_CHAPTER-13_ACCOUNTING REGULATION.pdfGUIA_LEGAL_CHAPTER-13_ACCOUNTING REGULATION.pdf
GUIA_LEGAL_CHAPTER-13_ACCOUNTING REGULATION.pdf
ProexportColombia1
 
Scam 1992 Harshad mehta scam pdf download
Scam 1992 Harshad mehta scam pdf downloadScam 1992 Harshad mehta scam pdf download
Scam 1992 Harshad mehta scam pdf download
bharatbharatjangid46
 
Lucknow Girls Call Kesar Bagh 08630512678 Provide Best And Top Girl Service A...
Lucknow Girls Call Kesar Bagh 08630512678 Provide Best And Top Girl Service A...Lucknow Girls Call Kesar Bagh 08630512678 Provide Best And Top Girl Service A...
Lucknow Girls Call Kesar Bagh 08630512678 Provide Best And Top Girl Service A...
eshikajshani
 
Solution Manual For Fundamentals of Financial Accounting, 8th Edition 2024 by...
Solution Manual For Fundamentals of Financial Accounting, 8th Edition 2024 by...Solution Manual For Fundamentals of Financial Accounting, 8th Edition 2024 by...
Solution Manual For Fundamentals of Financial Accounting, 8th Edition 2024 by...
rightmanforbloodline
 
Purdue University System degree offer diploma Transcript
Purdue University System degree offer diploma TranscriptPurdue University System degree offer diploma Transcript
Purdue University System degree offer diploma Transcript
oywfdy
 
https://silverone.com/investors/presentations/
https://silverone.com/investors/presentations/https://silverone.com/investors/presentations/
https://silverone.com/investors/presentations/
Adnet Communications
 
Introduction to trading Solana Memecoins.docx
Introduction to trading Solana Memecoins.docxIntroduction to trading Solana Memecoins.docx
Introduction to trading Solana Memecoins.docx
Raul Canessa
 
Northeastern University degree offer diploma Transcript
Northeastern University degree offer diploma TranscriptNortheastern University degree offer diploma Transcript
Northeastern University degree offer diploma Transcript
oywfdy
 
Google Pay: Save, Pay, Manage 17+ - App Store
Google Pay: Save, Pay, Manage 17+ - App StoreGoogle Pay: Save, Pay, Manage 17+ - App Store
Google Pay: Save, Pay, Manage 17+ - App Store
gargtinna79
 
Chapter_3 Lecture.pptx Agricultural Marketing Extension
Chapter_3 Lecture.pptx Agricultural Marketing ExtensionChapter_3 Lecture.pptx Agricultural Marketing Extension
Chapter_3 Lecture.pptx Agricultural Marketing Extension
HaimanotBAtinkut
 
University of Southern California degree offer diploma Transcript
University of Southern California degree offer diploma TranscriptUniversity of Southern California degree offer diploma Transcript
University of Southern California degree offer diploma Transcript
oywfdy
 
VIP Girls Call Noida 9873940964 Provide Best And Top Girl Service And No1 in ...
VIP Girls Call Noida 9873940964 Provide Best And Top Girl Service And No1 in ...VIP Girls Call Noida 9873940964 Provide Best And Top Girl Service And No1 in ...
VIP Girls Call Noida 9873940964 Provide Best And Top Girl Service And No1 in ...
AK47 AK47
 
Chapter 1 Introduction to Management.pdf
Chapter 1 Introduction to  Management.pdfChapter 1 Introduction to  Management.pdf
Chapter 1 Introduction to Management.pdf
rishavchakrabarti2
 
学生妹丝袜【网芷:ht28.co】校服做爱下载app观看>>>[网趾:ht28.co】]<<<
学生妹丝袜【网芷:ht28.co】校服做爱下载app观看>>>[网趾:ht28.co】]<<<学生妹丝袜【网芷:ht28.co】校服做爱下载app观看>>>[网趾:ht28.co】]<<<
学生妹丝袜【网芷:ht28.co】校服做爱下载app观看>>>[网趾:ht28.co】]<<<
amzhoxvzidbke
 

Recently uploaded (20)

OAT_RI_Ep21 WeighingTheRisks_June24_CommodityInflation.pptx
OAT_RI_Ep21 WeighingTheRisks_June24_CommodityInflation.pptxOAT_RI_Ep21 WeighingTheRisks_June24_CommodityInflation.pptx
OAT_RI_Ep21 WeighingTheRisks_June24_CommodityInflation.pptx
 
UCSC diploma, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore degree
UCSC diploma, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore degreeUCSC diploma, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore degree
UCSC diploma, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore degree
 
The Growth Story An Overview - India. .pptx
The Growth Story An Overview  - India. .pptxThe Growth Story An Overview  - India. .pptx
The Growth Story An Overview - India. .pptx
 
‘Not afraid to die’ Kenya tax protests inspire broader demand for change.pdf
‘Not afraid to die’ Kenya tax protests inspire broader demand for change.pdf‘Not afraid to die’ Kenya tax protests inspire broader demand for change.pdf
‘Not afraid to die’ Kenya tax protests inspire broader demand for change.pdf
 
ppt on Review of literature 1720335948098.pptx
ppt on Review of literature 1720335948098.pptxppt on Review of literature 1720335948098.pptx
ppt on Review of literature 1720335948098.pptx
 
05 BBA 20 23 Sem IV POM Forecasting Methods.pptx
05 BBA 20 23 Sem IV  POM Forecasting Methods.pptx05 BBA 20 23 Sem IV  POM Forecasting Methods.pptx
05 BBA 20 23 Sem IV POM Forecasting Methods.pptx
 
GUIA_LEGAL_CHAPTER-13_ACCOUNTING REGULATION.pdf
GUIA_LEGAL_CHAPTER-13_ACCOUNTING REGULATION.pdfGUIA_LEGAL_CHAPTER-13_ACCOUNTING REGULATION.pdf
GUIA_LEGAL_CHAPTER-13_ACCOUNTING REGULATION.pdf
 
Scam 1992 Harshad mehta scam pdf download
Scam 1992 Harshad mehta scam pdf downloadScam 1992 Harshad mehta scam pdf download
Scam 1992 Harshad mehta scam pdf download
 
Lucknow Girls Call Kesar Bagh 08630512678 Provide Best And Top Girl Service A...
Lucknow Girls Call Kesar Bagh 08630512678 Provide Best And Top Girl Service A...Lucknow Girls Call Kesar Bagh 08630512678 Provide Best And Top Girl Service A...
Lucknow Girls Call Kesar Bagh 08630512678 Provide Best And Top Girl Service A...
 
Solution Manual For Fundamentals of Financial Accounting, 8th Edition 2024 by...
Solution Manual For Fundamentals of Financial Accounting, 8th Edition 2024 by...Solution Manual For Fundamentals of Financial Accounting, 8th Edition 2024 by...
Solution Manual For Fundamentals of Financial Accounting, 8th Edition 2024 by...
 
Purdue University System degree offer diploma Transcript
Purdue University System degree offer diploma TranscriptPurdue University System degree offer diploma Transcript
Purdue University System degree offer diploma Transcript
 
https://silverone.com/investors/presentations/
https://silverone.com/investors/presentations/https://silverone.com/investors/presentations/
https://silverone.com/investors/presentations/
 
Introduction to trading Solana Memecoins.docx
Introduction to trading Solana Memecoins.docxIntroduction to trading Solana Memecoins.docx
Introduction to trading Solana Memecoins.docx
 
Northeastern University degree offer diploma Transcript
Northeastern University degree offer diploma TranscriptNortheastern University degree offer diploma Transcript
Northeastern University degree offer diploma Transcript
 
Google Pay: Save, Pay, Manage 17+ - App Store
Google Pay: Save, Pay, Manage 17+ - App StoreGoogle Pay: Save, Pay, Manage 17+ - App Store
Google Pay: Save, Pay, Manage 17+ - App Store
 
Chapter_3 Lecture.pptx Agricultural Marketing Extension
Chapter_3 Lecture.pptx Agricultural Marketing ExtensionChapter_3 Lecture.pptx Agricultural Marketing Extension
Chapter_3 Lecture.pptx Agricultural Marketing Extension
 
University of Southern California degree offer diploma Transcript
University of Southern California degree offer diploma TranscriptUniversity of Southern California degree offer diploma Transcript
University of Southern California degree offer diploma Transcript
 
VIP Girls Call Noida 9873940964 Provide Best And Top Girl Service And No1 in ...
VIP Girls Call Noida 9873940964 Provide Best And Top Girl Service And No1 in ...VIP Girls Call Noida 9873940964 Provide Best And Top Girl Service And No1 in ...
VIP Girls Call Noida 9873940964 Provide Best And Top Girl Service And No1 in ...
 
Chapter 1 Introduction to Management.pdf
Chapter 1 Introduction to  Management.pdfChapter 1 Introduction to  Management.pdf
Chapter 1 Introduction to Management.pdf
 
学生妹丝袜【网芷:ht28.co】校服做爱下载app观看>>>[网趾:ht28.co】]<<<
学生妹丝袜【网芷:ht28.co】校服做爱下载app观看>>>[网趾:ht28.co】]<<<学生妹丝袜【网芷:ht28.co】校服做爱下载app观看>>>[网趾:ht28.co】]<<<
学生妹丝袜【网芷:ht28.co】校服做爱下载app观看>>>[网趾:ht28.co】]<<<
 

Principle of lending

  • 2. Principle of lending • The business of lending, which is main business of the banks, carry certain inherent risks and bank cannot take more than calculated risk • whenever it wants to lend. Hence, lending activity has to necessarily adhere to certain principles. • Lending principles can be conveniently divided into two areas (i) activity, and (ii) individual.
  • 4. liquidity • Liquidity is an important principle of bank lending. Bank lend for short period only because they lend public money which can be withdrawn at any time by depositors. • They therefore advances loans on security of such assets which are easily marketable and convertible into the cash at short notice. • A bank chooses such securities in its investment portfolio which possess sufficient liquidity. It is essential because if the bank needs cash to meet the urgent requirement of its customers, it should be in position to sell some of the securities at a very short notice without disturbing their market prices much. • There are certain securities such as central, states and local govt. bonds which are easily saleable without affecting the price of market
  • 5. safety • The safety of funds lent is another principle of lending. • Safety means that the borrower should be able to repay the loan and interest in time at regular intervals without default. • The repayment of the loan depend upon the nature of the security, character of the borrower, his capacity to repay and his financial standing. • Like other investment bank investments involves risk but the degree of risk varies with the type of the securities of the central govt. are safer than those of the state govt. and local bodies.
  • 6. diversity • In choosing its investment portfolio a commercial bank should follow the principle of diversity. • It should not invest its surplus funds in a particular type of securities. It should choose the shares and debentures of different types of industries situated in different regions of the country. The same principle should be followed in the case of state govt. and local bodies. • Its aim at minimizing risk of the investment portfolio of a bank. it also applies to the advancing of loans to varied types of firms, industry, business and trades. • “ Do not keep all eggs in one basket ”
  • 7. stability • Another important principle of bank’s investment policy should be to invest in those stocks and securities which possess a high degree of stability in their price. • The bank cannot afford any loss on the value of its securities. It should therefore invest it funds in the shares of reputed companies where the possibility of decline in their prices is remote. Govt. bonds and debentures of companies carry fixed rates of interest. • Their value change with change in the market rate of interest. But the bank is forced to liquidate a portion of them to meet its requirement of cash in cash of financial crisis. • Otherwise they run to their full term of 10 years or more and change in the market rate of interest do not affect them much. Thus banks investments in debentures and bonds are more stable than in the shares of the companies.
  • 8. profitability • This is the cardinal principle for making investment by a bank. Its must earn sufficient profits. • It should therefore invest in such securities which was sure a fair and stable return on the funds invested. • The earning capacity of securities and share depends upon the interest rate and the dividend rate and the tax benefits they carry. • It is largely the govt. securities of the centre, state and local bodies that largely carry the exemptions of their interest from taxes. • The bank should invest more in such securities rather than in the shares of new companies which also carry tax exemption. This is because shares of new companies are not the safe investment.
  • 9. Secured Advances • Cardinal principle of sound banking is to ensure safety of funds lent by banker to his customers. • The banker therefore relies on primarily on the 3 C’s of borrower. • Secured advances are those advances which provide absolute safety to the banker in means of charge created on the tangible assets of the borrower in favor of the banker.
  • 10. Modes of creating charge : Lien • Section 171 of the Indian Contract Act confers the right of general lien on the banker. • The banker is empowered to secure all securities of the customers, in result of the general balance due from him. • The ownership of stock securing is not transferred from the customer to the banker.
  • 11. Negative Lien • The borrower gives a declaration to the banker that his assets mentioned therein are free from any charge or encumbrance. • He also gives an undertaking that he shall not create any charge or dispose them off without permission of the banker. • The borrower cannot dispose of the assets or create any charge there on without the consent of the banker.
  • 12. PLEDGE • Sec. 172 of the Indian Contract Act – 1872 defines pledge as ‘bailment of goods as security for payment of debt or performance of a promise. • Pledge is used when the lender (pledgee) takes actual possession of assets (i.e. certificates, goods ). Such securities or goods are movable securities. In this case the pledgee retains the possession of the goods until the pledgor (i.e. borrower) repays the entire debt amount. In case there is default by the borrower, the pledgee has a right to sell the goods in his possession and adjust its proceeds towards the amount due (i.e. principal and interest amount). Some examples of pledge are Gold /Jewellery Loans, Advance against goods,/stock, Advances against National Saving Certificates etc. • The person who offer security is called – PLEDGER • To whom it is offered is called – PLEDGEE
  • 13. HYPOTHECATION : • It is used for creating charge against the security of movable assets, but here the possession of the security remains with the borrower itself. • Thus, in case of default by the borrower, the lender (i.e. to whom the goods / security has been hypothecated) will have to first take possession of the security and then sell the same. • The best example of this type of arrangement are Car Loans. In this case Car / Vehicle remains with the borrower but the same is hypothecated to the bank / financer. • In case the borrower, defaults, banks take possession of the vehicle after giving notice and then sell the same and credit the proceeds to the loan account. • Other examples of these hypothecation are loans against stock and debtors. [Sometimes, borrowers cheat the banker by partly selling goods hypothecated to bank and not keeping the desired amount of stock of goods. • In such cases, if bank feels that borrower is trying to cheat, then it can convert hypothecation to pledge i.e. it takes over possession of the goods and keeps the same under lock and key of the bank].
  • 14. MORTGAGE : • Sec. 58 of the transfer of property Act 1882 defines mortgage as – • It is used for creating charge against immovable property which includes land, buildings or anything that is attached to the earth or permanently fastened to anything attached to the earth (However, it does not include growing crops or grass as they can be easily detached from the earth). • The best example when mortage is created is when someone takes a Housing Loan / Home Loan. In this case house is mortgaged in favour of the bank / financer but remains in possession of the borrower, which he uses for himself or even may give on rent. • In this case transfer is called “MORTGAGOR” • Transferee is called – “MORTGAGEE” • Principle money & Int. thereon is called – “MORTGAGE MONEY” • Instrument is called – “MORTGAGE DEED”.
  • 15. • Simple Mortgage • Mortgage by condition sale • English Mortgage • Mortgage by deposit of title deed or equitable mortgage • Anomalous mortgage Forms of mortgage
  • 16. Difference Between Pledge, Hypothecation and Mortgage Pledge Hypothecation Mortgage Type of Security Movable Movable Immovable Possession of the security Remains with lender (pledgee) Remains with Borrower Usually Remains with Borrower Examples of Loan where used Gold Loan, Advance against NSCs, Adv against goods (also given under hypothecation) Car / Vehilce Loans, Adv against stock and debtors Housing Loans
  • 17. Priority Sector • Priority sector refers to those sectors of the economy which may not get timely and adequate credit in the absence of this special dispensation. • Typically, these are small value loans to farmers for agriculture and allied activities, micro and small enterprises, poor people for housing, students for education and other low income groups and weaker sections.
  • 18. Categories under priority sector • (i) Agriculture • (ii) Micro and Small Enterprises • (iii) Education • (iv) Housing • (v) Export Credit • (vi) Others
  • 19. Targets and Sub-targets for banks under priority sector Categories Domestic commercial banks / Foreign banks with 20 and above branches (As percent of ANBC or Credit Equivalent of Off-Balance Sheet Exposure, whichever is higher) Foreign banks with less than 20 branches (As percent of ANBC or Credit Equivalent of Off-Balance Sheet Exposure, whichever is higher) Total Priority Sector 40 32 Total agriculture 18 No specific target. Advances to Weaker Sections 10 No specific target.
  • 20. 'Direct Finance' for Agricultural Purposes (i) Loans to individual farmers [including Self Help Groups (SHGs) or Joint Liability Groups (JLGs), i.e. groups of individual farmers] engaged in Agriculture and Allied Activities, viz., dairy, fishery, animal husbandry, poultry, bee-keeping and sericulture. (ii) Loans to corporate including farmers' producer companies of individual farmers, partnership firms and co-operatives of farmers directly engaged in Agriculture and Allied Activities, viz., dairy, fishery, animal husbandry, poultry, bee-keeping and sericultureup to an aggregate limit of `2 crore per borrower. (iii) Loans to small and marginal farmers for purchase of land for agricultural purposes. (iv) Loans to distressed farmers indebted to non-institutional lenders. (v) Bank loans to Primary Agricultural Credit Societies (PACS), Farmers’ Service Societies (FSS) and Large-sized Adivasi Multi Purpose Societies (LAMPS) ceded to or managed/ controlled by such banks for on lending to farmers for agricultural and allied activities.
  • 21. 'Indirect Finance' to Agriculture (i) If the aggregate loan limit per borrower is more than `2 crore in respect of para. (4) (ii) above, the entire loan will be treated as indirect finance to agriculture. (ii) Loans upto `5 crore to Producer Companies set up exclusively by only small and marginal farmers under Part IXA of Companies Act, 1956 for agricultural and allied activities. (iii) Bank loans to Primary Agricultural Credit Societies (PACS), Farmers’ Service Societies (FSS) and Large-sized Adivasi Multi Purpose Societies (LAMPS).
  • 22. Micro and Small Enterprises under priority sector • Bank loans to Micro and Small Manufacturing and Service Enterprises, provided these units satisfy the criteria for investment in plant machinery/equipment as per MSMED Act 2006.
  • 23. Manufacturing sector Enterprises Investment in plant and machinery Micro Enterprises Do not exceed twenty five lakh rupees Small Enterprises More than twenty fivelakh rupees but does not exceed five crore rupees Enterprises Investment in equipment Micro Enterprises Does not exceed ten lakh rupees Small Enterprises More than ten lakh rupees but does not exceed two crore rupees
  • 24. Loan limit for education under priority sector • Loans to individuals for educational purposes including vocational courses upto `10 lakh for studies in India and `20 lakh for studies abroad are included under priority sector.
  • 25. limit for housing loans under priority sector • Loans to individuals up to `25 lakh in metropolitan centres with population above ten lakh and `15 lakh in other centres for purchase/construction of a dwelling unit per family excluding loans sanctioned to bank’s own employees.
  • 26. under Weaker Sections under priority sector • Priority sector loans to the following borrowers are considered under Weaker Sections category:- (a) Small and marginal farmers; (b) Artisans, village and cottage industries where individual credit limits do not exceed `50,000; (c) Beneficiaries of Swarnjayanti Gram Swarozgar Yojana (SGSY), now National Rural Livelihood Mission (NRLM); (d) Scheduled Castes and Scheduled Tribes; (e) Beneficiaries of Differential Rate of Interest (DRI) scheme; (f) Beneficiaries under Swarna Jayanti Shahari Rozgar Yojana (SJSRY); (g) Beneficiaries under the Scheme for Rehabilitation of Manual Scavengers (SRMS); (h) Loans to Self Help Groups; • (i) Loans to distressed farmers indebted to non-institutional lenders; • (j) Loans to distressed persons other than farmers not exceeding `50,000 per borrower to prepay their debt to non-institutional lenders; • (k) Loans to individual women beneficiaries upto `50,000 per borrower;
  • 27. The rate of interest for loans under priority sector • The rate of interest on various priority sector loans will be as per RBI’s directives issued from time to time, which is linked to Base Rate of banks at present. Priority sector guidelines do not lay down any preferential rate of interest for priority sector loans