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October 27, 2015
October 25 – 28, 2015
Dallas, TX
Learn, Ask, Do
The Corridor Game : Take 2
PANELISTS
¨  Kelly Betteridge, Planning Manager
TriMet, Portland, OR
¨  Arturo Herrera, Senior Service Planner
VIA Metro...
Objectives
¨  Learn about US Corridor Projects
¤  Multiple Modes
¤  Different Locales
¤  Trade Offs / Priorities
¨  A...
Agenda
¨  Powell-Division BRT, TriMet, Portland OR
¤  Partnerships & Planning
¨  Primo BRT Corridors, VIA, San Antonio ...
The Powell-Division Corridor
New Mode, New Team, New Tools
Rail~Volution
October 27, 2015
Kelly Betteridge, TriMet
The Powell-Division Corridor
§  Project Overview
§  Team
§  Steering committee
§  Community
§  Agency/Jurisdictional ...
Build Your Team
§  Twenty-two member Steering Committee with
broad representation of agency, community
and jurisdictional...
• Briefings
• Culturally specific,
multilingual engagement
• Youth engagement
• Local business
engagement
• Community and ...
"Building trust is building
relationships," Boisen said.
"We're trying to build
relationships with key
community members w...
Steering Committee Advanced this
Alignment with Options
Build Your Toolbox
§  Analysis of existing trips on the system (stop
spacing)
§  Top intersections for congestion (desig...
Analysis of existing trips
§  Methodology and sample size
§  25-29% of bus trips in both directions sampled for
each lin...
Methodology (con’t)
§  Surveyors scan card and
hand to every rider upon
boarding.
§  Cards collected and
immediately sca...
What We Learned
§  About 5% of riders travel less than 0.5 miles.
§  About 18% of riders travel 5+ miles.
§  Average di...
Top intersections for congestion
§  A few key intersections govern the entire
corridor
§  Investment in key intersection...
Design Requirements by
Jurisdiction
§  Upfront conversation about “deal breakers”
versus points of discussion/negotiation...
Key Take Aways
§  Build Your Team
§  Really get to know the communities you will serve
and engage them in the process.
§...
Primo Corridors: San Antonio’s BRT Case Study
Learn,	
  Ask,	
  and	
  Do:	
  The	
  Corridor	
  Game	
  Take	
  2	
  20	
...
Overview	
  
•  1,220	
  square	
  miles	
  
•  13	
  Member	
  Ci3es	
  
•  92	
  Routes	
  
•  450	
  Buses	
  
•  7,200...
VIA Primo: San Antonio’s BRT
22	
  
Overview	
  of	
  the	
  Primo	
  Network	
  
•  10	
  –	
  12	
  minute	
  service	
 ...
Here’s the “then”
23	
  
120’	
  ROW	
  
Here’s the “wish we could”
24	
  
Pedestrian	
  push	
  for	
  dedicated	
  lanes:	
  
•  Reconstruc3on	
  of	
  Fredericksburg	
  would	
  have	
  included...
And here’s the “what we got”
26	
  
The future is so bright… Right?
27	
  
What other challenges do we face?
28	
  
12’	
  BUS	
  LANE	
   9’	
  SIDEWALK	
  12’6”	
  SIDEWALK	
   11’	
  LANE	
  
BU...
What other challenges do we face?
29	
  
View	
  of	
  the	
  
parking	
  garage	
  
8’	
  PLATFORM	
  
/	
  PARKING	
  
1...
A diverse cross section of cross-sections
30	
  
•  Stakeholder/Community	
  Mee3ngs	
  
o  Priori3zing	
  modes	
  
§  Pedestrian	
  ameni3es	
  must	
  always	
  be	
  ...
Lessons Learned & Take Aways
32	
  
•  “One	
  Network,	
  One	
  Solu3on”	
  is	
  not	
  prac3cal	
  
o  Neither	
  is	
...
City	
  of	
  San	
  Francisco	
  	
  
BeOer	
  Market	
  Street	
  Project	
  
	
  
	
  
	
  
	
  
	
  Rail~VoluKon	
  
O...
San	
  Francisco:	
  BeOer	
  Market	
  Street	
  
Heart	
  of	
  the	
  San	
  Francisco	
  
Market	
  Street	
  
Mission...
San	
  Francisco:	
  BeOer	
  Market	
  Street	
  
Typical	
  Current	
  Roadway	
  
Configura]on	
  
Google	
  Streetview	...
San	
  Francisco:	
  BeOer	
  Market	
  Street	
  
Compe]ng	
  Travel	
  Modes	
  
Google	
  Streetview	
  2015	
  
San	
  Francisco:	
  BeOer	
  Market	
  Street	
  
Over-­‐Capacity	
  
Google	
  Streetview	
  2015	
  
San	
  Francisco:	
  BeOer	
  Market	
  Street	
  
Visioning	
  Process	
  
•  Extensive	
  series	
  of	
  workshops	
  c...
•  Private	
  vehicular	
  traffic	
  restric]ons	
  for	
  greater	
  transit	
  reliability	
  
•  Signal	
  ]ming	
  modi...
•  Increase	
  width	
  of	
  sidewalks	
  
•  Implement	
  intersec]on	
  improvements	
  
•  Add	
  pedestrian	
  ameni]...
Shared	
  vehicular/bike	
  lanes	
  or	
  separated	
  cycletrack	
  for	
  
safety	
  and	
  increased	
  capacity	
  
S...
San	
  Francisco:	
  BeOer	
  Market	
  Street	
  
Environmental	
  Evalua]on	
  
Market	
  Street	
   Mission	
  Street	
...
•  Improve	
  Transit	
  Efficiency	
  and	
  Reliability	
  
•  Support	
  City’s	
  planned	
  growth	
  and	
  economic	
...
San	
  Francisco:	
  BeOer	
  Market	
  Street	
  
Tradeoffs	
  Amongst	
  Transporta]on	
  Modes	
  
•  Alloca]ng	
  more	...
San	
  Francisco:	
  BeOer	
  Market	
  Street	
  
Alterna]ves	
  1	
  and	
  2	
  (Op]on	
  A)	
  -­‐Tradeoffs	
  
•  Impr...
San	
  Francisco:	
  BeOer	
  Market	
  Street	
  
Alterna]ves	
  1	
  and	
  2	
  (Op]on	
  B)	
  -­‐	
  Tradeoffs	
  
•  ...
San	
  Francisco:	
  BeOer	
  Market	
  Street	
  
Alterna]ve	
  3	
  -­‐	
  Tradeoffs	
  
•  Improvements	
  to	
  exis]ng...
San	
  Francisco:	
  BeOer	
  Market	
  Street	
  
Design	
  and	
  Access	
  Considera]ons	
  
Con]nuous	
  dedicated	
  ...
San	
  Francisco:	
  BeOer	
  Market	
  Street	
  
Design	
  and	
  Access	
  Considera]ons	
  
Loading/private	
  vehicle...
San	
  Francisco:	
  BeOer	
  Market	
  Street	
  
Strategies	
  to	
  get	
  to	
  Construc]on	
  
•  Extensive	
  stakeh...
QUESTIONS
¨  Kelly Betteridge betterik@trimet.org
¨  Arturo Herrera arturo.herrera@viainfo.net
¨  Aaron Carter acarter@...
Game of Corridors
GAME TIME
¨  Break into groups (3 minutes)
¨  Open your game pieces
- Marvel at the array of choices! (5 minutes)
¨  De...
GAME TIME - RULES
¨  Ideal Multimodal Corridor
¤  Think of a corridor you are familiar with. Suppose you
are working to ...
GAME PIECES
¨  Light Rail: Two-Way
Corridor
¨  BRT: Two-Way Corridor
¨  Transit Station/Platform
¨  Two Travel Lanes
¨...
GAME TIME - RULES
¨  Constrained Multimodal Corridor (70 feet)
¤  Must accommodate bus or train
¨  How did you accommod...
GAME TIME - RULES
¨  Constrained Multimodal Corridor (70 feet)
¤  Must accommodate trains or buses
¤  Stealing other pe...
October 27, 2015
October 25-28, 2015
Dallas TX
THANK YOU
RV 2015: Learn, Ask and Do: The Corridor Game Take 2 by James Hencke
RV 2015: Learn, Ask and Do: The Corridor Game Take 2 by James Hencke
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RV 2015: Learn, Ask and Do: The Corridor Game Take 2 by James Hencke

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Learn about corridor planning across the country. Ask questions. Then build your own corridor! Hear how planners struggle to accommodate multiple transportation modes (bus, BRT, light rail, auto, freight, bike, pedestrian) within a limited right of way. Review case studies from San Francisco, San Antonio and Portland. Study the tradeoffs inherent in different cross-section treatments and strategies for prioritizing design to respond to planning goals and land use context. Then put everything you've learned to work as you design your own multimodal corridors to solve for different planning problems. Easier said than done, but an active and humbling learning experience.

Moderator: James Hencke, ASLA, LEED AP, Senior Landscape Architect, David Evans and Associates, Inc, Portland, Oregon
Elizabeth Mros-O'Hara, AICP, Investment Areas Project Manager, Regional Principal Planner, Metro, Portland, Oregon
Kelly Betteridge, Planning Manager, TriMet, Portland, Oregon
Aaron Carter, Manager, ICF International, San Francisco, California
Arturo Herrera, Senior Service Planner, VIA Metropolitan Transit Authority, San Antonio, Texas

Published in: Engineering
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RV 2015: Learn, Ask and Do: The Corridor Game Take 2 by James Hencke

  1. 1. October 27, 2015 October 25 – 28, 2015 Dallas, TX Learn, Ask, Do The Corridor Game : Take 2
  2. 2. PANELISTS ¨  Kelly Betteridge, Planning Manager TriMet, Portland, OR ¨  Arturo Herrera, Senior Service Planner VIA Metropolitan Transit Authority, San Antonio, TX ¨  Aaron Carter, Manger ICF International, San Francisco, CA ¨  Elizabeth Mros-O’Hara, Investment Areas Proj. Mngr. Metro, Portland, OR ¨  James Hencke, Sr. Urban Designer David Evans and Associates, Portland, OR
  3. 3. Objectives ¨  Learn about US Corridor Projects ¤  Multiple Modes ¤  Different Locales ¤  Trade Offs / Priorities ¨  Ask Questions ¨  Do : Apply Your Knowledge
  4. 4. Agenda ¨  Powell-Division BRT, TriMet, Portland OR ¤  Partnerships & Planning ¨  Primo BRT Corridors, VIA, San Antonio TX ¤  BRT Implementation, Lessons Learned, Path Forward ¨  Better Market Street, City of San Francisco CA ¤  Multiple Modes, Complete Streets
  5. 5. The Powell-Division Corridor New Mode, New Team, New Tools Rail~Volution October 27, 2015 Kelly Betteridge, TriMet
  6. 6. The Powell-Division Corridor §  Project Overview §  Team §  Steering committee §  Community §  Agency/Jurisdictional Partners §  Toolbox §  Ridership data §  Top sources of delay §  Design requirements
  7. 7. Build Your Team §  Twenty-two member Steering Committee with broad representation of agency, community and jurisdictional partners §  Strong partnership between agency partners including “the even-handed convener” (Metro) “the operator” (TriMet) and “the facility owners” (ODOT, Cities) §  Award winning outreach strategies to communities in the corridor
  8. 8. • Briefings • Culturally specific, multilingual engagement • Youth engagement • Local business engagement • Community and related projects’ events • Talk with staff sessions
  9. 9. "Building trust is building relationships," Boisen said. "We're trying to build relationships with key community members who will help us connect with other people in the community."… "There's a tremendous opportunity for us to implement transit-oriented development in this area that will be really beneficial." – Lori Boisen, Division- Midway Alliance for Community Development
  10. 10. Steering Committee Advanced this Alignment with Options
  11. 11. Build Your Toolbox §  Analysis of existing trips on the system (stop spacing) §  Top intersections for congestion (design treatment bang for the buck) §  Clearly communicated “design requirements” by jurisdiction/owner (agency deal breakers)
  12. 12. Analysis of existing trips §  Methodology and sample size §  25-29% of bus trips in both directions sampled for each line on Monday-Friday. §  Sample is for trips between 6am and 10pm. §  About 3,600 usable on-off pairs analyzed
  13. 13. Methodology (con’t) §  Surveyors scan card and hand to every rider upon boarding. §  Cards collected and immediately scanned again when rider departs. §  Surveyors report at least 90% of riders participated.
  14. 14. What We Learned §  About 5% of riders travel less than 0.5 miles. §  About 18% of riders travel 5+ miles. §  Average distance traveled is 3.2 miles. §  No substantial difference in distance traveled by time of day, geography, or route.
  15. 15. Top intersections for congestion §  A few key intersections govern the entire corridor §  Investment in key intersections has greatest “bang for the buck” in terms of travel time.
  16. 16. Design Requirements by Jurisdiction §  Upfront conversation about “deal breakers” versus points of discussion/negotiation in design Agency Comment Priority 1= fyi 5= design exception 10= fatal flaw Schedule Priority Before LPA, by 10% By 30% All proposed new signals will need to obtain region and state traffic engineer approval 5 10% design
  17. 17. Key Take Aways §  Build Your Team §  Really get to know the communities you will serve and engage them in the process. §  Work with project partners to identify clear project goals and what each agency/jurisdiction feels is a “deal breaker” §  Build Your Toolbox §  Decisions are data driven §  Find innovative ways to get the data you need
  18. 18. Primo Corridors: San Antonio’s BRT Case Study Learn,  Ask,  and  Do:  The  Corridor  Game  Take  2  20   Arturo Herrera, Jr. VIA Metropolitan Transit Authority
  19. 19. Overview   •  1,220  square  miles   •  13  Member  Ci3es   •  92  Routes   •  450  Buses   •  7,200  bus  stops   •  5  Transit  Centers   •  8  Park  and  Rides   •  44M  passenger  trips  per  year   VIA Metro Transit: It’s A Fine Agency 21  
  20. 20. VIA Primo: San Antonio’s BRT 22   Overview  of  the  Primo  Network   •  10  –  12  minute  service  from  6:00  a.m.  to  6:00  p.m.   •  Use  of  Transit  Signal  Priority   •  Branded  Sta3ons/Stops   •  Branded  BRT  Vehicles  (60’  and  40’  Fleet)   •  Stop  Spacing:  ¾  to  1  mile  apart   •  Operates  in  Mixed  Traffic  and/or  Dedicated  Bus  Lanes   •  1  line  in  opera3on  today   •  2  lines  in  planning  stage   •  3  addi3onal  lines  iden3fied  for  future  implementa3on  
  21. 21. Here’s the “then” 23   120’  ROW  
  22. 22. Here’s the “wish we could” 24  
  23. 23. Pedestrian  push  for  dedicated  lanes:   •  Reconstruc3on  of  Fredericksburg  would  have  included  the  addi3on  of  6’   sidewalks  on  either  side  (get  rid  of  the  wild  west  of  driveways)   •  U3lity  adjustments  (get  them  out  of  the  sidewalk!)   •  ADA  ramps  and  accessible  facili3es     What  about  [fill  in  the  blank]?     •  Elderly  (and  those  with  mobility  issues):  enter  pedestrian  refuge   •  Economic  Development:  a  greater  sense  of  permanence     •  Patrons:  decreased  travel  3mes  and  greater  reliability   •  Access  Management:  limi3ng  lea  turning  movements   Reality  Strikes  Again!   •  Economic  downturn  put  funding  into  ques3on     •  Concerns  regarding  SOV  capacity  during  peak  hours   •  “Who’s  ROW  is  it?”  problems…   Pedestrian  push  for  dedicated  lanes:   •  Reconstruc3on  of  Fredericksburg  would  have  included  the  addi3on  of  6’   sidewalks  on  either  side  (get  rid  of  the  wild  west  of  driveways)   •  U3lity  adjustments  (get  them  out  of  the  sidewalk!)   •  ADA  ramps  and  accessible  facili3es     What  about  [fill  in  the  blank]?     •  Elderly  (and  those  with  mobility  issues):  enter  pedestrian  refuge   •  Economic  Development:  a  greater  sense  of  permanence     •  Patrons:  decreased  travel  3mes  and  greater  reliability   •  Access  Management:  limi3ng  lea  turning  movements   Benefits of dedicated lanes … 25   Pedestrian  push  for  dedicated  lanes:   •  Reconstruc3on  of  Fredericksburg  would  have  included  the  addi3on  of  6’   sidewalks  on  either  side  (get  rid  of  the  wild  west  of  driveways)   •  U3lity  adjustments  (get  them  out  of  the  sidewalk!)   •  ADA  ramps  and  accessible  facili3es    
  24. 24. And here’s the “what we got” 26  
  25. 25. The future is so bright… Right? 27  
  26. 26. What other challenges do we face? 28   12’  BUS  LANE   9’  SIDEWALK  12’6”  SIDEWALK   11’  LANE   BUS  STOP   11’  LANE  
  27. 27. What other challenges do we face? 29   View  of  the   parking  garage   8’  PLATFORM   /  PARKING   12’6”  SIDEWALK   9’  SIDEWALK  14’  TRAVEL  AND    BIKE  LANE   12’  HCT  /   TRAVEL  LANE  
  28. 28. A diverse cross section of cross-sections 30  
  29. 29. •  Stakeholder/Community  Mee3ngs   o  Priori3zing  modes   §  Pedestrian  ameni3es  must  always  be  included   o  Find  “local”  Champions     o  Investment  in  the  community   •  Branding  and  Designing  needs  to  fit  with  surrounding  communi3es   and  land  uses   •  Are  all  modes  always  appropriate              in  all  corridors/condi3ons?   31   Lessons Learned & Take Aways
  30. 30. Lessons Learned & Take Aways 32   •  “One  Network,  One  Solu3on”  is  not  prac3cal   o  Neither  is  “One  Corridor,  One  Solu3on”   •  Your  most  vocal  opponents  should  be  the  some  of  the  first  individuals   you  meet;  encourage  their  par3cipa3on   •  Access  Management  will  save  travel  3me  and  reduce  accidents   •  How  to  “sell”  dedicated  transit  lanes?  
  31. 31. City  of  San  Francisco     BeOer  Market  Street  Project            Rail~VoluKon   October  27,  2015   Google  Maps  2015  Google  Maps  2015  Google  Maps  2015  
  32. 32. San  Francisco:  BeOer  Market  Street   Heart  of  the  San  Francisco   Market  Street   Mission  Street   Google  Maps  2015  
  33. 33. San  Francisco:  BeOer  Market  Street   Typical  Current  Roadway   Configura]on   Google  Streetview  2015  
  34. 34. San  Francisco:  BeOer  Market  Street   Compe]ng  Travel  Modes   Google  Streetview  2015  
  35. 35. San  Francisco:  BeOer  Market  Street   Over-­‐Capacity   Google  Streetview  2015  
  36. 36. San  Francisco:  BeOer  Market  Street   Visioning  Process   •  Extensive  series  of  workshops  conducted  from  2011   through  2013   •  Design  priori]es  and  design  drivers  iden]fied  during   this  process  include:   •  Improving  transit  speed,  reliability  and  capacity   •  Improving  pedestrian  and  bicyclist  mobility  and  safety   •  Enhancing  the  public  experience  
  37. 37. •  Private  vehicular  traffic  restric]ons  for  greater  transit  reliability   •  Signal  ]ming  modifica]ons   •  Extension  of  transit-­‐only  lanes   •  Modified  stop  spacing  and  new  stop  loca]ons  for  rapid  service   •  New,  relocated  and  consolidated  transit  boarding  stops  and   islands       San  Francisco:  BeOer  Market  Street   Proposed  Transit  Improvements   San  Francisco  Public  Works  2014  
  38. 38. •  Increase  width  of  sidewalks   •  Implement  intersec]on  improvements   •  Add  pedestrian  ameni]es  and  streetscape  enhancements   San  Francisco:  BeOer  Market  Street   Proposed  Pedestrian  Improvements   San  Francisco  Public  Works  2014  
  39. 39. Shared  vehicular/bike  lanes  or  separated  cycletrack  for   safety  and  increased  capacity   San  Francisco:  BeOer  Market  Street   Proposed  Bicycle  Facility  Improvements   San  Francisco  Public  Works  2014  
  40. 40. San  Francisco:  BeOer  Market  Street   Environmental  Evalua]on   Market  Street   Mission  Street   Alterna]ve  1:  Market  Street   transit-­‐only  center  lane,   shared  outside  lanes,   pedestrian  ameni]es,   private  vehicular  restric]ons   Alterna]ve  2:  Same  as   Alterna]ve  1  but  with  fewer   vehicular  and  loading   restric]ons   Alterna]ve  3:  Dedicated  bicycle  facili]es  on  Mission  Street.  Bus   transit  moves  to  Market  Street.  Pedestrian  ameni]es  on  both   Market  and  Mission  Streets.   Google  Maps  2015  
  41. 41. •  Improve  Transit  Efficiency  and  Reliability   •  Support  City’s  planned  growth  and  economic  development   •  Improve  pedestrian  safety,  comfort  and  mobility,  and   maintain  capacity   •  Improve  bicyclist  safety,  comfort  and  mobility  and  increase   capacity   •  Maintain  access  for  taxis  and  paratransit  and  accommodate   commercial  deliveries   San  Francisco:  BeOer  Market  Street   Primary  Objec]ves  
  42. 42. San  Francisco:  BeOer  Market  Street   Tradeoffs  Amongst  Transporta]on  Modes   •  Alloca]ng  more  space  to  pedestrian  uses  restricts  space   available  for  other  transporta]on  uses   •  Enhanced  transit  service  influences  design  of  pedestrian,   bicycle,  and  vehicular  facili]es  and  vice-­‐versa   •  Private  vehicular  use,  businesses  loading  needs  and  access  to   residences  on  Market  Street  requires  compromise  to  transit,   pedestrian  and  cycletrack  improvements         Not  enough  space  for  all  needs!  
  43. 43. San  Francisco:  BeOer  Market  Street   Alterna]ves  1  and  2  (Op]on  A)  -­‐Tradeoffs   •  Improvements  to  exis]ng  transit  facili]es,  pedestrian  safety  and  ameni]es   •  Improvements  to  exis]ng  bicycle  facili]es  (new  painted  sharrows)   •  Widespread  private  vehicular/loading  restric]ons  on  Market  Street  (restric]ons  under   Alterna]ve  2  less  than  Alterna]ve  1)   * Alternative 1: shared lane would include transit, taxis, commercial vehicles, paratransit vehicles and vehicles with ADA placards or plates. Alternative 2: shared lane would also allow all other private vehicles.   San  Francisco  Public  Works  2014  
  44. 44. San  Francisco:  BeOer  Market  Street   Alterna]ves  1  and  2  (Op]on  B)  -­‐  Tradeoffs   •  Improvements  to  exis]ng  transit  facili]es,  pedestrian  safety  and  ameni]es   •  Improvements  to  exis]ng  bicycle  facili]es  (new  dedicated  cycletrack,  except  where   conflicts  with  BART  portals  exist)   •  Widespread  private  vehicular/loading  restric]ons  on  Market  Street  (restric]ons   under  Alterna]ve  2  less  than  Alterna]ve  1)   * Alternative 1: shared lane would include transit, taxis, commercial vehicles, paratransit vehicles and vehicles with ADA placards or plates. Alternative 2: shared lane would also allow all other private vehicles.   San  Francisco  Public  Works  2014  
  45. 45. San  Francisco:  BeOer  Market  Street   Alterna]ve  3  -­‐  Tradeoffs   •  Improvements  to  exis]ng  transit  facili]es  on  Market  Street  (transit  shijed  from   Mission  Street  to  Market  Street)   •  Improvements  to  pedestrian  safety  and  ameni]es  on  Market  and  Mission  Streets   •  Pedestrian  travel  distance  to  access  transit  increases   •  Transit  on  Market  Street  becomes  at  risk  for  conges]on   ** Alternative 3 includes the same improvements to Market Street as Alternative 1, Design Option A.   San  Francisco  Public  Works  2014  
  46. 46. San  Francisco:  BeOer  Market  Street   Design  and  Access  Considera]ons   Con]nuous  dedicated  bicycle  facility  design  may  not  be  feasible   due  to  right-­‐of-­‐way  conflicts   BART   San  Francisco  Public  Works  2014  
  47. 47. San  Francisco:  BeOer  Market  Street   Design  and  Access  Considera]ons   Loading/private  vehicle  restric]ons  under  Alterna]ves  1  and  2  may   preclude  access  to  some  businesses  and  residents   7th  Street   8th  Street   Market  Street   What  if  your  business  is  here?   Google  Maps  2015  
  48. 48. San  Francisco:  BeOer  Market  Street   Strategies  to  get  to  Construc]on   •  Extensive  stakeholder  engagement  and  visioning   •  Robust  environmental  evalua]on  to  ensure  that   environmental  factors  are  considered   •  Con]nued  outreach  to  stakeholders  as  design   progresses  through  construc]on   •  Con]nued  outreach  to  other  local,  State  and  Federal   agencies  to  ensure  proper  buy-­‐in  
  49. 49. QUESTIONS ¨  Kelly Betteridge betterik@trimet.org ¨  Arturo Herrera arturo.herrera@viainfo.net ¨  Aaron Carter acarter@icfi.com
  50. 50. Game of Corridors
  51. 51. GAME TIME ¨  Break into groups (3 minutes) ¨  Open your game pieces - Marvel at the array of choices! (5 minutes) ¨  Design your ideal multimodal corridor with transit (10 minutes)
  52. 52. GAME TIME - RULES ¨  Ideal Multimodal Corridor ¤  Think of a corridor you are familiar with. Suppose you are working to fix it. ¤  Must accommodate trains or buses ¤  Stealing other people’s ideas is encouraged ¤  Be ready to defend your design
  53. 53. GAME PIECES ¨  Light Rail: Two-Way Corridor ¨  BRT: Two-Way Corridor ¨  Transit Station/Platform ¨  Two Travel Lanes ¨  Single Travel Lanes ¨  Angled Parking ¨  Parallel Parking ¨  Landscaped Median (Center of Street) ¨  Green Strip (btwn. Curb & Sidewalk) ¨  Cycle Track ¨  Bike Lane ¨  Sidewalk
  54. 54. GAME TIME - RULES ¨  Constrained Multimodal Corridor (70 feet) ¤  Must accommodate bus or train ¨  How did you accommodate all your modes? ¨  What are the tradeoffs you made? Why?
  55. 55. GAME TIME - RULES ¨  Constrained Multimodal Corridor (70 feet) ¤  Must accommodate trains or buses ¤  Stealing other people’s ideas is encouraged ¤  Be ready to defend your design ¨  How did you accommodate all your modes? ¨  What are the tradeoffs you made? Why?
  56. 56. October 27, 2015 October 25-28, 2015 Dallas TX THANK YOU

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