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New Developments in Transit Oriented Development

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2010 ULI Fall Meeting Presentation
October 14, 2010
9:30 am to 10:45 am

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New Developments in Transit Oriented Development

  1. 1. New Developments in Transit Oriented Development Thursday, October 14 9:30 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.
  2. 2. HUD recommended links  Partnership Newsletter http://portal.hud.gov/portal/page/portal/HUD/program_offices/sustainable_housing_communi ties/SustainableCommunitiesPrograms4-29-10.pdf  Office of Sustainable Housing and Communities www.hud.gov/sustainability
  3. 3. MARYLAND DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Transit Oriented Development Program 3
  4. 4. 4 MDOT Office of Real Estate • Maryland Secretary of Transportation’s Office • Responsible for TOD Projects at MDOT Stations: – Baltimore Metro; Baltimore Light Rail; MARC • Support WMAT TOD Efforts at Washington Metro Stations: – Staff assigned at MDOT – Financial support for WMATA projects
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  6. 6. 6 MDOT Uniquely Situated • MDOT includes all transportation modes: – MTA and SHA property – Coordination of modal effort • MDOT has its own funding sources • MDOT has significant staff and consulting resources • In 2007, MDOT needed a legal framework for TOD
  7. 7. Maryland TOD Law of 2008 The TOD Law: • Defines TOD • Makes TOD an MDOT transportation purpose • Creates TOD process – Joint Designation by MDOT and local government 7
  8. 8. 8 Maryland TOD Law of 2009 The 2009 TOD law expands local government authority at TODs: • MEDCO can issue TIF bonds • Special Assessment Districts can fund non- county assets • SAD’s can fund operations and maintenance • Any local tax can fund a TIF Bond
  9. 9. 9 Maryland Sustainable Communities Act of 2010 • Streamlines smart growth efforts • Extends Historic Tax Credits • Makes TOD’s eligible for historic tax credits
  10. 10. 10 TOD Executive Order 2009 Location priority for new State facilities to be: • ½ mile of a transit station • Designated a TOD
  11. 11. Designation Process • Designation Criteria: – Good TOD – Defined State role or other need for Designation • Local government nominates projects • State and local government joint designation 11
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  13. 13. MDOT TOD Projects • No set formula for TOD • Legal, Business, and Political rules often do not fit well to TOD • Every project is different • Every project is difficult TOD requires extraordinary effort, flexibility, and actions 13
  14. 14. Long list of TOD Projects • Symphony Center Light Rail • Owings Mills Metro • Savage MARC • State Center Metro/Light Rail • Reisterstown Plaza Metro • Laurel MARC • Odenton MARC • Penn Station MARC/Amtrak • Howard Street Light Rail • West Baltimore MARC • Johns Hopkins/EBDI Metro • Rogers Avenue Metro • Cromwell Light Rail • Muirkirk MARC • Baltimore Redline stations • Silver Spring Metro • New Carrollton Metro • Branch Avenue Metro • Bethesda Metro • White Flint Metro • Wheaton Metro • Twinbrook Metro • Rockville Town Center/ Metro • Naylor Road Metro • West Hyattsville Metro • College Park Metro • Largo Metro • Prince George’s Plaza Metro • Morgan Boulevard Metro • Glenmont Metro14 14
  15. 15. State Center • 28 acre State-owned parcel • Adjacent to Nine neighborhoods • Light Rail, Metro, Amtrak, MARC
  16. 16. 2010 - Current Site
  17. 17. Green Transit Community
  18. 18. State Center Inner Harbor Druid Hill Park North Avenue Route 40 Pratt Street Marc/Amtrak Penn Station Mt. Vernon Square MLKBlvd
  19. 19. State Center • State Center, LLC is developer – Woman led (Caroline Moore) – Minority ownership (33%) • $1.6 billion mixed-use project • Five phases over 10-15 years • LEED Silver and LEED Neighborhood • Congress for New Urbanism Charter Award Recipient (2010) 19
  20. 20. State Center Phase One • State is leasing the property to developer • State is leasing back office space • State is financing a shared garage • State receives 7% of net cash flow as part of ground rent • Developer seeking TIF and PILOT from the City • Groundbreaking within the next three to four months 20
  21. 21. 21 What’s Next? “Transit Communities” • The ½ mile radius around existing stations can theoretical accommodate all growth in Maryland for 20 years • Potential program to build dense transit communities around stations • Requires partnership of state agencies, local government, and federal government • We must plan ahead for the new transit lines
  22. 22. THANK YOU 22
  23. 23. Transit-oriented Development in Arlington 23 EPA 2002 -- First National Award for Smart Growth
  24. 24. Context  Arlington, Virginia – 25.8 sq. miles in area including federal lands  At the confluence of major regional transportation facilities  Home to major federal facilities: Pentagon, Fort Meyer, Arlington Hall  Located in the core of a rapidly growing Washington region (over 5 million residents, 3 million jobs and 1,200 sq. miles of urbanized area)  Continuing to grow – with over 247,000 residents and 280,000 jobs projected by 2040 24 0 50,000 100,000 150,000 200,000 250,000 300,000 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020 2030 Households Residents Jobs
  25. 25. Development Concepts  Concentrate high and mid- density redevelopment around transit stations (highly targeted) and taper down to existing neighborhoods  Encourage a mix of uses and services in station areas  Create high quality pedestrian environments and enhanced open space  Preserve and reinvest in established residential neighborhoods 25
  26. 26. Creating Environments Rich In Travel Choices  Site Plan Development  County Infrastructure Investments  Expanded Transit Service  Support for Emerging Travel Options 26
  27. 27. Sector Plans  The sector plans identify: • Desired public improvements • Location for retail • Urban design standards • Public infrastructure needs • Open space, streetscape standards  They are intended to tell landowners, developers and residents what the future of the station area will be and how individual parcels can be redeveloped 27
  28. 28. Sector Plans  In response to development proposals, county will rezone for higher density use shown on GLUP  Lower (pre-existing) zoning remains in place until proposal receives County Board approval of a special exception site plan  The sector plan allows significantly higher density & height than underlying zoning (1.5 - 3.8, 55 ft - 153 ft) 28
  29. 29. Requiring Development- Specific Transportation Demand Management  Participation in County-wide Commuter Services programs  Transit subsidies  On-site improvements including sidewalk/streetscape and bicycle facilities  On-site travel information  Parking management  Transportation performance surveys 29 EPA – Potomac Yard (completed 2006) ATP participant Employee transit subsidies Dedicated transitway and station Sidewalk and bicycle improvements Market-rate parking charges On-site transportation coordinator
  30. 30. Transportation Strategies to Influence Travel Patterns  Concentrate mixed use development around transit stations  Create environments rich in travel choices  Time transportation improvements including expansion of transit service to development  Provide comprehensive travel information and encouragement  Expand development-specific TDM requirements  Increase focus on parking management (supply and pricing) 30
  31. 31. Benefits of Transit- oriented Development  Getting to work – transit use – National avg: 4.7 % – Fairfax County: 7.3 % – Arlington: 23.3% And, those who walk to work are double the national avg, 5 times Fairfax 31
  32. 32. Benefits of Transit- oriented Development  Numbers are more dramatic in Arlington’s Metro corridors – Car ownership: 17.9% have zero cars, while less than 25% have 2 or more – Getting to work: Less than half drive  39.3% use transit  10.5% walk or bike  2.3 work at home 32
  33. 33. 33 Aerial View of Arlington and Washington, D.C. "Today, Arlington is a shining example of what citizen engagement, visionary planning, and wise use of scarce resources can do for the livability of a community.“ – SmartGrowthAmerica.org • 11 Metro transit stops along two Metro corridors • More downtown office space than Boston, Los Angeles and Denver • Mixed-uses of office, retail, hotel and residential within ¼ mile of Metro • Development density concentrated within 10% of Arlington’s land area Transit-oriented Growth Outcomes:
  34. 34. Thank you to learn more about Arlington, please visit www.arlingtonva.us Thank you to learn more about Arlington, please visit www.arlingtonva.us
  35. 35. October 2010
  36. 36. Washington State ‣ Growth Management Act
  37. 37. Puget Sound Region ‣ Transition underway in Bel- Red
  38. 38. Bel-Red Corridor
  39. 39. Bel-Red Corridor
  40. 40. Bel-Red Corridor
  41. 41. Sound Transit East Link – Preferred Alignment
  42. 42. Bel-Red Light Rail Alignment
  43. 43. Office/medical office Mixed-use office Mixed-use housing Mixed-use retail housing Office/housing transition Housing Commercial OR-1 OR-2 Bel-Red Zoning – Adopted 2009
  44. 44. Bellevue Mobility and Infrastructure
  45. 45. Bellevue Mobility and Infrastructure
  46. 46. Bellevue Mobility and Infrastructure - Complete/ under construction
  47. 47. Bellevue Mobility and Infrastructure - Complete/ under construction - 405 Braided Ramps (2012)
  48. 48. - Complete/ under construction - 405 Braided Ramps (2012) - Phase 1 (2009–2019) Bellevue Mobility and Infrastructure
  49. 49. - Complete/ under construction - 405 Braided Ramps (2012) - Phase 1 (2009–2019) - SR 520/124th Interchange Bellevue Mobility and Infrastructure
  50. 50. Bellevue Mobility and Infrastructure - Complete/ under construction - 405 Braided Ramps (2012) - Phase 1 (2009–2019) - SR 520/124th Interchange - Future Phases
  51. 51. Comprehensive Transportation Plan
  52. 52. Integrated Land Use and Transportation Plan  Office/medical office  Mixed-use office Mixed-use housing Mixed-use retail housing Office/housing transition Housing Commercial
  53. 53. Integrated Land Use and Transportation Plan  Office/medical office  Mixed-use office Mixed-use housing Mixed-use retail housing Office/housing transition Housing Commercial Downtown mixed-use
  54. 54. The Spring District ‣ Existing Uses • Warehouse • Distribution • Transportation Base • Storage
  55. 55. The Spring District ‣ Infrastructure • Transportation • Utility Systems • Local Streets & Sidewalks • Dedicated Public Spaces
  56. 56. The Spring District ‣ Phase One • 800,000 sf office • Ground Floor Retail • Parks and Recreation • Residential
  57. 57. The Spring District ‣ Future Phases • Additional Office • Hotel • Ground Floor Retail
  58. 58. The Spring District ‣ Future Phases • Additional Office • Hotel • Ground Floor Retail • Mix of Other Uses • Sense of Place
  59. 59. The Spring District ‣ Future Phases • Additional Office • Hotel • Ground Floor Retail • Mix of Other Uses • Sense of Place • Vibrant and Diverse • Sustainable
  60. 60. The Spring District ‣ Future Phases • Additional Office • Hotel • Ground Floor Retail • Mix of Other Uses • Sense of Place • Vibrant and Diverse • Sustainable
  61. 61. Bel-Red Corridor - Vision The Spring District Light Rail 130th Station Area
  62. 62. Diverse, Urban Feel
  63. 63. Public Open Space
  64. 64. Access
  65. 65. An Emerging Urban Neighborhood

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