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Email Lesson
 

Email Lesson

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    Email Lesson Email Lesson Presentation Transcript

    • Lesson Thirteen Writing Email
    •  
    • Email Electronic Mail The Internet is compiled of many different applications: Email takes up the most space and used more frequently than any other application on the internet.
    • Email Each email address has a certain server that it is sent to, and that server takes the message and sends it out through the internet to the recipient
    • Question: Approximately how many emails are sent each day around the world? A. 24 million B. 400 million C. 31 billion D. 62 billion
    • Answer According to a CNN article, in 2001, the International Data Corporation (IDC) predicted the number of emails sent each day would exceed 36 billion by 2005. But in 2003, the IDC reported that 31 billion emails were already being sent daily, and they expected the number to double by 2006.
    • Approximately 62,000,000,000 emails are sent each day.
    • Form and Content Teaching email is difficult because there are not many set rules. There are certain conventions that many people follow, but there is also a lot of room to diverge from convention.
    • Form and Content The form and content of email is very similar to letters, so we will be able to apply most of the knowledge that we already have. In other words, you already have a good knowledge base from which to start.
    • Form and Content However, there are some differences between email and letters in terms of form and content because the medium of email allows us to perform special tasks that are simply not possible with letters.
      • Parts of Email
      • From
      • To
      • CC (carbon copy)
      • BCC (bi-carbon copy)
      • Date
      • Subject
      • Opening
      • Body
      • Closing
      • Signature Block
      • Attachments
      • Business Letter
      • Date
      • Sender’s Address
      • Insider Address
      • Salutation
      • Body
      • Closing
      • Enclosures
      • Typist Initials
    • Parts of Email Body Signature Closing Greeting From To Date Subject
    • Parts of Email Subject From Body Greeting To Date CC
    • Parts of Email Body Signature Block Attachments
      • Part of Email
      • Even though there are many different parts of an email, we don’t have to worry about some of them.
      • Two reasons:
      • The computer does it automatically
      • Conventions of email
    • 1. The computer does it automatically
      • Types of Email :
      • Personal
      • Business
      • Both of these types of email have different conventions that most people will follow.
      2. Conventions of email
      • Parts of Email
      • From
      • To
      • CC (carbon copy)
      • BCC (bi-carbon copy)
      • Date
      • Subject
      required optional optional required automatic automatic
    • Parts of Email 7. Opening 8. Body 9. Closing 10. Signature Block 11. Attachments optional optional optional optional required
    • Form and Content Compare the following sample with your knowledge of business letters.
    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
    • Form and Content Compare the following sample with your knowledge of personal letters.
    •  
      • How to write an email : Step-by-Step
      • 1. Write appropriate email addresses correctly in the “To”, “CC”, and/or “BCC fields
      • Write the subject of the email. Be sure that the subject aptly identifies the topic of the email.
      • Write an appropriate greeting based on the level of formality and familiarity with the reader. (optional)
      • How to write an email : Step-by-Step
      • Write the body of the letter. Most people do not indent the paragraphs; instead, they use the ‘block’ style and skip a single line between paragraphs
      • Write a closing punctuated with a comma (optional)
      • ‘ Sign’ your name (optional)
      • Attach documents (optional)
      • How to write an email : Step-by-Step
      • Spell Check
      • Send
    • [email_address] [email_address] Birthday Wishes! Mr. Simoneaux, I just wanted to wish you a happy and let you know that I bought you a new car as a present. You can pick the keys up tomorrow! Take care, Michael birtday birthday
    • Email Etiquette How do I compose an email to someone I don't know? There are a few important points to remember when composing email, particularly when the email's recipient is a superior and/or someone who does not know you.
      • Email Etiquette
      • How do I compose an email to someone I don't know?
      • 1. Be sure to include a meaningful subject line; this helps clarify what your message is about and may also help the recipient prioritize reading your email
      • Email Etiquette
      • How do I compose an email to someone I don't know?
      • 2. Just like a written letter, be sure to open your email with a greeting like Dear Dr. Jones, or Ms. Smith:
      • Email Etiquette
      • How do I compose an email to someone I don't know?
      • 3. Use standard spelling, punctuation, and capitalization. THERE'S NOTHING WORSE THAN AN EMAIL SCREAMING A MESSAGE IN ALL CAPS.
    •  
    •  
    •  
      • Email Etiquette
      • How do I compose an email to someone I don't know?
      • 4. Be friendly and cordial, but don't try to joke around (jokes and witty remarks may be inappropriate and, more commonly, may not come off appropriately in email)
    • Email Etiquette What are some guides for continuing email conversations? 1. Once you have exchanged emails with a person on a given subject, it is probably OK to leave greetings out of your follow-up emails.
      • Email Etiquette
      • What are some guides for continuing email conversations?
      • 2. Try to respond within a reasonable time frame, though "reasonable" will depending on the recipient's expectations and the subject being discussed
      • Email Etiquette
      • What are some guides for continuing email conversations?
      • 3. Trim back the old messages: most email clients will keep copying older messages to the bottom of an email. Delete older messages so as to keep your message size from getting too large, and to keep your messages looking clean.
    • Email Etiquette What sorts of information shouldn't be sent via email? Most people do not realize that email is not as private as it may seem. Without additional setup, email is not encrypted; meaning that your email is "open" and could possibly be read by an unintended person as it is transmitted to your reader.
    • Email Etiquette What sorts of information shouldn't be sent via email? Avoid sensitive information that could be potentially damaging to someone's career and/or reputation, including your own.
    • Email Etiquette What sorts of information shouldn't be sent via email? Beyond email's general lack of security and confidentiality, your recipient can always accidentally hit the Forward button, leave her email account open on a computer, or print and forget that she's printed a copy of your email.
    • Email Etiquette What about sending attachments? The ease of transmitting files to a particular person makes email very attractive. However, there are some guidelines you should follow:
      • Email Etiquette
      • What about sending attachments?
      • 1. Never send an attachment to someone you don't know the first time you contact them (unless, of course, the contact has posted a job ad requesting a resume in a Word document). They (or their computers) might think it is spam or a virus, and delete your message.
      • Email Etiquette
      • What about sending attachments?
      • 2. Avoid unnecessarily large file sizes. Digital photos especially: most digital photos come off the camera much larger than can be viewed on screen. Learn how to resize your digital photographs.
      • Email Etiquette
      • What about sending attachments?
      • 3. When you must send a large file or set of files, do the recipient the courtesy of sending an email telling them what you'll be sending and why.
      • Email Etiquette
      • What about sending attachments?
      • 3. When you must send a large file or set of files, do the recipient the courtesy of sending an email telling them what you'll be sending and why.
      • Email Etiquette
      • What about sending attachments?
      • 4. Be sure to have anti-virus software installed on your computer to scan all of your outgoing and incoming messages for viruses.
    • Writing Assignment Write a business email in reply to the business letter that you wrote last week. Due via email before our next class.
    • Writing Assignment
      • Instructions:
      • Read your original business letter from the perspective of the PR Department at Nike.
      • Compose a response to the letter.
      • Include your name, class, and student numbers in the subject line of your email.
      • Send your email to the following address:
      • [email_address]
    • Situation Two You work in the Public Relations Department at Nike and you must respond to a letter that you just received from concerned citizens from Neijiang. After doing some research, you find out that the environmental impact on the Tuo Jiang could be very bad.
    • Write a business email in response to alleviate their concerns and assure them that Nike is doing everything possible to minimize the negative environmental effects on the Tuo Jiang. The problem is that you must be honest as you write this letter, so you must use your knowledge of rhetoric to write a letter that emphasizes the positives.
      • Accentuating the Positives
      • When you need to present negative information, soften its effects by superimposing a positive picture on a negative one.
      • Stress what something is rather than what it is not.
      • Emphasize what the firm or product can and will do rather than what it cannot.
      • Open with action rather than apology or explanation.
      • Avoid words which convey unpleasant facts.
    • Embedded Position Place good news in positions of high emphasis: at the beginnings and endings of paragraphs, letters, and even sentences. Place bad news in secondary positions: in the center of paragraphs, letters, and, if possible, sentences.
    • Effective Use Of Space Give more space to good news and less to bad news. Evaluate the following examples to determine whether or not they present negative information favorably.
    •