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Interactive Teaching Strategies
Interactive Teaching Strategies
Interactive Teaching Strategies
Interactive Teaching Strategies
Interactive Teaching Strategies
Interactive Teaching Strategies
Interactive Teaching Strategies
Interactive Teaching Strategies
Interactive Teaching Strategies
Interactive Teaching Strategies
Interactive Teaching Strategies
Interactive Teaching Strategies
Interactive Teaching Strategies
Interactive Teaching Strategies
Interactive Teaching Strategies
Interactive Teaching Strategies
Interactive Teaching Strategies
Interactive Teaching Strategies
Interactive Teaching Strategies
Interactive Teaching Strategies
Interactive Teaching Strategies
Interactive Teaching Strategies
Interactive Teaching Strategies
Interactive Teaching Strategies
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Interactive Teaching Strategies

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Lecture Slides in Interactive Teaching Strategies

Lecture Slides in Interactive Teaching Strategies

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  • Talk through the aims for the session.
  • Expand on the powerpoint notes: Visual Learners Learn best when they can use pictures, mind maps, diagrams, flow charts, visual artefacts, key words, display, TV, video camera, ICT, posters… Auditory Learners Learn best through sound, discussions (paired or groups), tapes, debates, rhymes, repetition, drama, music, explanation, ICT… Kinaesthetic Learner Learn best through movement or touch, ICT, experiments, trips, sequencing, placing events on a timeline, physical movement, role play, brain gym..
  • Bring the session to a conclusion by reminding participants of how children learn, using the above list. This list is also presented as a poster in the pack.
  • Start with clear learning objectives/outcomes Helps you plan session and helps participants by providing clear view of the session’s direction Follow an outline and provide copies to participants Periodically refer to the learning outcomes during the session to remind everyone where you are and prevent people from getting lost
  • Research shows people will: Listen for only 15-20 minutes without a break Learn more when given an opportunity to process what they are learning Retain more if they review or use the information immediately after learning it
  • Transcript

    • 1. Interactive Teaching Strategies http://pinoyguro.net
    • 2. Objectives:- To identify the different learning styles- To explore how interactive teaching strategies support all learners- To share practical ideas for whole class teaching
    • 3. Learning Styles • Visual Learners - remember images, shapes and colours • Auditory Learners - remember voices, sounds and music • Kinaesthetic - remember by doing, moving and touching
    • 4. I Remember... • 5% of what I hear • 10% of what I read • 20% of what I hear and read • 30% of what I am shown • 50% of what I discuss • 75% of what I do • 90% of what I teach others
    • 5. Interactive Teaching• Involves facilitator and learners• Encourage and expect learners to participate• Use questions to stimulate discussion, emphasizing the value of answers• Give participants hands-on experience• Use teaching aids to gain and retain attention
    • 6. Where to Start…• Start with clear learning objectives/outcomes – Helps you plan session and helps participants by providing clear view of the session’s direction• Follow an outline and provide copies to participants – Periodically refer to the learning outcomes during the session to remind everyone where you are and prevent people from getting lost
    • 7. Increase ParticipationResearch shows people will: – Listen for only 15-20 minutes without a break – Learn more when given an opportunity to process what they are learning – Retain more if they review or use the information immediately after learning it
    • 8. Lecturing. . . . • Lecture is the duct-tape of the teaching world • Lecturing delivers “concepts” • It delivers a lot of information in a short amount of time • Conveys information that is difficult to present in another way
    • 9. Avoid Over Use Because:• In a lecture your learners are passive• Doesn’t guarantee understanding, no feedback from learners• Easily bores the audience unless well prepared
    • 10. Points to Keep in Mind • Lowest retention value of all teaching techniques • Make more interactive by involving the group by frequently stopping and asking questions • Strive for a “30% / 70% split – 30% lecture/ 70% active discussion
    • 11. Why use facilitation rather than lecture in a training session?• Participants like to be actively involved• Participants want to share knowledge and ideas• You don’t have to be an expert and answer all questions, because learners can address questions as well• Keeps group’s attentive and involved
    • 12. Working in Groups • Work groups are the workhorse of interactive teaching • Work groups should be standard in every training program!
    • 13. Using Work Groups• Stimulates individual input• Learners obtain feedback from multiple perspectives• Offers opportunity for peer instruction• Allows you to evaluate their learning
    • 14. How to Utilize Work Groups1. Explain the 1. Monitor progress procedure 2. Act as a2. Form groups timekeeper &3. Describe task answer questions4. Specify a time limit 3. Have groups report5. Ask for scribes to entire group6. Recommend a 4. Process the process information
    • 15. When to Use Group Work• Warm ups• Practice Session• Review• Break Up Lectures• Complete assignments
    • 16. Incorporating Interactivity• As you select activities, consider the learners’ wants and needs, number of participants, size and layout of the room• Ask yourself – “What am I trying to teach these people?” – “Do I want them to share ideas and learn from each other?” – “Do I want them to internalize something on their own?” – “Do I want to test their knowledge?”• Plan a variety of activities into your session to help participants stay interested
    • 17. Interactive TechniquesThese techniques have multiple benefits:- the instructor can easily and quicklyassess if students have really masteredthe material (and plan to dedicate moretime to it, if necessary), and the process ofmeasuring student understanding inmany cases is also practice for thematerial
    • 18. Interactive Techniques- Students are revived from their passivity of merely listening to a lecture and instead become attentive and engaged, two prerequisites for effective learning.- These techniques are often perceived as “fun”, yet they are frequently more effective than lectures at enabling student learning.
    • 19. See the list...
    • 20. Instructional IssuesUse of Technology- Slide Presentation- Film Viewing- The Internet
    • 21. Summary• Telling is not teaching, nor is listening learning.• You must engage participants in learning activities that lead to a higher level of understanding and result in the participants ability to apply what he learned on the job.• Interactive teaching is a two-way process of active participant engagement with each other, the facilitator, and the content.
    • 22. Summary• Keep in mind, however, that interactivity is a means to a greater end – participant learning. The most effective learning involves leading participants to a point of reflection on content – What does this mean to me? – How can I use this? – Is this better than what Im doing now? – This reflection is the goal of interactivity.
    • 23. Thank You!

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