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Networked Teachers

Unlocking the potential of social networks
for professional development
Catania
October 17th, 2013

Ma...
Overview
 What does ‘networked’ mean in the context
of professional development?
 Teachers and professional development:...
What does ‘networked’ mean in
relation to professional
development?
CoPs vs NoPs

CoPs

NoPs

(Lave & Wenger, 1991)

(Brown e Duguid, 2000)

identity

domain

community

network

practice

p...
Crowds vs Community

Crowds

Community

‘lightwieght’
collaboration
general interest
towards the project
weak ties

‘heavy...
Community vs Collective

Community

Collective

belonging

participation

high entry costs

low entry costs

shared identi...
In synthesis…
 Network, crowd, collective as new emerging
informal learning environment through the
online social network...
Teachers and professional
development: what needs,
what types of knowledge?
Novice Teachers’needs
• Integrating within the campus culture and the
new professional context
• Learning to teach conside...
Teachers and professional knowledge
Content knowledge

Pedagogical
content
knowledge

Knowledge of learners

Pedagogical k...
Teachers and social networks:
what is the added value?
Benefits
 Building and negotiating professional identity
 Sharing of educational practices and experiences,
methodologic...
Challenges
Erosion of boundaries between personal and
professional identities, with critical consequences
for identity ma...
Some examples from the field
Groups of teachers in Facebook
 Study 1 aimed at investigating the sociodemographic data of the founders/administrators,
...
Groups of teachers in Facebook
• Generic groups seem to be mainly characterized by bridging
social capital, whereas themat...
The Networked Teachers:
where are we now,
where do we want to be?
The future
Collaborative
problem solving

Openess (methods,
contents, people)

Sustainable
innovation
Some references
Brown, J. S., & Duguid, P. (2000). The Social Life of Information.
Boston, MA: Harvard Business School Pre...
Some references
Manca S. e Ranieri M. (2013a), I Social Network nello sviluppo
professionale, «Form@Re - Open Journal Per ...
Thank you! 

My online social presence
e-mail:maria.ranieri@unifi.it
academia.edu: http://unifi.academia.edu/mariaranieri...
Networked Teachers
Networked Teachers
Networked Teachers
Networked Teachers
Networked Teachers
Networked Teachers
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  • Transcript of "Networked Teachers"

    1. 1. Networked Teachers Unlocking the potential of social networks for professional development Catania October 17th, 2013 Maria Ranieri Dep. of Education and Psychology, University of Florence
    2. 2. Overview  What does ‘networked’ mean in the context of professional development?  Teachers and professional development: what needs, what types of knowledge?  Teachers and social networks: what is the added value?  Some examples from the field  The Networked Teachers: where are we now, where do we want to be?
    3. 3. What does ‘networked’ mean in relation to professional development?
    4. 4. CoPs vs NoPs CoPs NoPs (Lave & Wenger, 1991) (Brown e Duguid, 2000) identity domain community network practice practice
    5. 5. Crowds vs Community Crowds Community ‘lightwieght’ collaboration general interest towards the project weak ties ‘heavyweight’ collaboration reputation (Haythornthwaite, 2011) strong ties
    6. 6. Community vs Collective Community Collective belonging participation high entry costs low entry costs shared identity individual identities (Thomas & Brown, 2011)
    7. 7. In synthesis…  Network, crowd, collective as new emerging informal learning environment through the online social networks  Characterised by weak ties and bridging social capital  Prompting latent ties, that are “technically possible but not yet activated socially” (Haythornthwaite 2005: 137)
    8. 8. Teachers and professional development: what needs, what types of knowledge?
    9. 9. Novice Teachers’needs • Integrating within the campus culture and the new professional context • Learning to teach considering the needs of their students and the requirements of the curriculum • Developing their own professional identity
    10. 10. Teachers and professional knowledge Content knowledge Pedagogical content knowledge Knowledge of learners Pedagogical knowledge Curriculum knowledge Knowledge of educational values
    11. 11. Teachers and social networks: what is the added value?
    12. 12. Benefits  Building and negotiating professional identity  Sharing of educational practices and experiences, methodological exchange and discussion about implicit pedagogies  Mentoring novice teachers and peer tutoring  Emotional and social support regarding professional life  Hybridization between real and virtual life as triggering factor for new initiatives
    13. 13. Challenges Erosion of boundaries between personal and professional identities, with critical consequences for identity management Risk to be controlled by superiors with unpredictable consequences on an administrative level Digital divide and incomplete adoption rate Lack (or low level) of social networking skills
    14. 14. Some examples from the field
    15. 15. Groups of teachers in Facebook  Study 1 aimed at investigating the sociodemographic data of the founders/administrators, the characteristics of groups and behaviours related to group management  September–October 2011  Study 2 intended to detect socio-demographic data, use of and habits related to digital technologies, and participation in Facebook groups  December 2011–January 2012 Ranieri M., Manca S. e Fini A. (2012), Why (and how) do teachers engage in social networks? An exploratory study of professional use of Facebook and its Implications for lifelong learning, «British Journal of Educational Technology», Vol. 43, n. 5, pp. 754-769.
    16. 16. Groups of teachers in Facebook • Generic groups seem to be mainly characterized by bridging social capital, whereas thematic groups by bonding social capital • In generic groups SNS seems to play the role of an infrastructure enabling the activation of ‘latent ties’. In thematic groups SNS plays the role of supporting the maintenance of social capital and of existing ties • In thematic groups the direction of the movement between online/offline activities would be from offline to online, whereas in generic groups the direction is reversed, from online to offline
    17. 17. The Networked Teachers: where are we now, where do we want to be?
    18. 18. The future Collaborative problem solving Openess (methods, contents, people) Sustainable innovation
    19. 19. Some references Brown, J. S., & Duguid, P. (2000). The Social Life of Information. Boston, MA: Harvard Business School Press. Haythornthwaite C. (2011), Learning networks, crowds and communities. In Proceedings of the Learning Analytics and Knowledge Conference, Alberta, Canada, February 28 - March 1, 2011, pp. 18-22. Himanen P. (2001), The Hacker Ethic and the Spirit of the Information Age, Random House Inc. New York, NY, USA. Manca S. e Ranieri M. (2013a), Is it a tool suitable for learning? A critical review of the literature on Facebook as a technologyenhanced learning environment, «Journal of Computer Assisted Learning», Vol. 29, n. 5.
    20. 20. Some references Manca S. e Ranieri M. (2013a), I Social Network nello sviluppo professionale, «Form@Re - Open Journal Per La Formazione In Rete», Vol. 13, n. 1, pp. 1-9. Manca S. & Ranieri M. (in press), Does Facebook provide educational value? An overview of theoretical and empirical advancements of affordances and critical issues. In G. Mallia (Ed.), The Social Classroom: Integrating Social Network Use in Education, Hershey, PA, IGI Global. Ranieri M., Manca S. & Fini A. (2012), Why (and how) do teachers engage in social networks? An exploratory study of professional use of Facebook and its implications for lifelong learning, «British Journal of Educational Technology», Vol. 43, n. 5, pp. 754-769. Thomas, D. & Brown, J. S. (2011). A New Culture of Learning: Cultivating the Imagination for a World of Constant Change.
    21. 21. Thank you!  My online social presence e-mail:maria.ranieri@unifi.it academia.edu: http://unifi.academia.edu/mariaranieri researchgate: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Maria_Ranieri/?ev=hdr_xprf linkedIn: it.linkedin.com/pub/maria-ranieri/2a/39a/b28 slideshare: http://www.slideshare.net/MariaRanieri1 diigo: https://www.diigo.com/user/mariaranieri scoop.it!: http://www.scoop.it/u/maria-ranieri twitter: http://twitter.com/emmeran facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ranierimaria

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