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Creative Commons & Open Textbooks

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Presentation to Camosun College faculty as part of the Camosun Open Textbook adoption workshop in May, 2013.

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Creative Commons & Open Textbooks

  1. 1. CLINT LALONDE This presentation is a derivative work based upon 2 works: Adopting Open Textbooks Workshop by Paul Stacey and Open Education: The Business and Policy Case for OER by Dr. Cable Green., both of which were licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License (CC-BY) Except where otherwise noted this Adopting Open Textbooks Workshop presentation is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License (CC-BY)
  2. 2. PAUL STACEY Except where otherwise noted these Adopting Open Textbooks Workshop materials are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License (CC-BY)
  3. 3. Open Education: The Business and Policy Case for OER Dr. Cable Green Director of Global Learning cable@creativecommons.org @cgreen
  4. 4. OER Global Logo by Jonathas Mello is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Unported 3.0 License
  5. 5. What are OER? “OER are teaching, learning, and research resources that reside in the public domain or have been released under an intellectual property license that permits their free use and re-purposing by others.” Source: William & Flora Hewlett Foundation http://www.hewlett.org/programs/education-program/open-educational-resources
  6. 6. What are OER? “Open Educational Resources (OERs) are any type of educational materials that are in the public domain or introduced with an open license. The nature of these open materials means that anyone can legally and freely copy, use, adapt and re-share them.” Source: UNESCO http://www.unesco.org/new/en/communication-and-information/access-to-knowledge/open-educationalresources/what-are-open-educational-resources-oers/
  7. 7. Reusability Paradox The more context a learning object has, the more (and the more easily) a learner can learn from it. To make learning objects maximally reusable, learning objects should contain as little context as possible. The Reusability Paradox image by David Wiley used under a Creative Commons Attribution License (CC-BY 3.0) Retrieved from http://cnx.org/content/m11898/latest/
  8. 8. “Therefore, pedagogical effectiveness and potential for reuse are completely at odds with one another, unless the end user is permitted to edit the learning object.” Source: The Reusability Paradox, David Wiley, Connexions. http://cnx.org/content/m11898/latest/
  9. 9. ©
  10. 10. Some Rights Reserved Creative Commons logo by Creative Commons used under under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License
  11. 11. ©
  12. 12. ©
  13. 13. ©
  14. 14. Creative Commons License Features Credit: Adopting Open Textbooks Workshop by Paul Stacey licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License (CC-BY
  15. 15. Credit: Adopting Open Textbooks Workshop by Paul Stacey licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License (CC-BY
  16. 16. Spectrum of Openness Which of these licenses are suitable for OER? Credit: Adopting Open Textbooks Workshop by Paul Stacey licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License (CC-BY
  17. 17. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/ Credit: Adopting Open Textbooks Workshop by Paul Stacey licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License (CC-BY
  18. 18. How Machine Readable Code works IRL* Flickr Advanced Search Google Advanced Search * In Real Life
  19. 19. Creative Commons License Chooser http://creativecommons.org/choose/ Image taken from Creative Commons website and used under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License
  20. 20. http://wiki.creativecommons.org/Marking Image taken from Creative Commons website and used under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License
  21. 21. So how do I properly mark the CC stuff I use?
  22. 22. Attribution 1) If original has © include. 2) Cite the author's name, screen name, user identification, etc . It is nice to link that name to the person's profile page, if such a page exists. 3) Cite the work's title or name, if such a thing exists. It is nice to link the name or title directly to the original work. 4) Cite the specific CC license the work is under, and link to the specific CC license 5) (optional) Identify your work as derivative. http://wiki.creativecommons.org/Marking/Users#Examples
  23. 23. Shark! by guitarfish used under Creative Commons Attribution Non-C license
  24. 24. Never will be me This is a modified image based on Shark! by guitarfish used under Creative Commons Attribution Non-C license. This modified image is released under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-C license.
  25. 25. Never will be me Sharks are a group of fish characterized by a cartilaginous skeleton, five to seven gill slits on the sides of the head, and pectoral fins that are not fused to the head. This is a modified image based on Shark! by guitarfish used under Creative Commons Attribution Non-C license Shark text from Wikipedia and used under a Creative Commons Attribution Share license This modified image is released under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-C license.
  26. 26. Adaptations http://wiki.creativecommons.org/Frequently_Asked_Questions
  27. 27. Collections http://wiki.creativecommons.org/Frequently_Asked_Questions
  28. 28. Marking 3rd Party Content In A Collection http://wiki.creativecommons.org/Marking/Creators/Marking_third_party_content Image taken from Creative Commons website and used under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License
  29. 29. Your turn What’s That License?
  30. 30. Finding Open Textbooks Where to start? Quality?
  31. 31. Finding Open Textbooks • • • • • Open.bccampus.ca Connexions Minnesota Open Textbook Referatory College Open Textbooks American Institute of Math (AIM)
  32. 32. Reading an Open Textbook HTML – Universal, reading at length on web - meh PDF – Print on Demand, cumbersome in eReader ePub – standard still far from standard. Accessibility http://bccampus.pressbooks.com/dbdesign/
  33. 33. Creating & Modifying Textbooks Multiple input formats – major challenge

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