magic pixie wonder dust
3000 (enterprise Edition)
designing motivational experiences
Sebastian Deterding (@dingstweets)
UX...
2
Why care
How it works
3
4
How to do it
1
What it is
2
Why care
How it works
3
4
How to do it
1
What it is
What
happened
here?
From Usability to Motivation
Robert Fabricant
»Behavior is our
medium.«
interaction’09 (2009)
Fitness
Sustainability
Education
How it works
3
4
How to do it
1
What it is
Why care
2
From
utility
to
psychology
shift
#1
utility
usability
the great beyond
New market differentiators
Meaning
Emotion
Transformation
Experience
Pleasure
Identity
Buy!
new value chains
Upload!
Comment!
Tag!
Digg!
Forward!
Invite!
Bookmark!
Retweet!
Share!
Add friend!
Design!
Mark as S...
New markets
health self-
improvement eco/green
From
rational actor
to
social animal
Shift
#2
+
Then: The Rational Actor
Now: The Social Animal
Poor choices/actions are due to ...
rational actor social animal
Lack of information
Misaligned incentives
Motivation
Emot...
shift
#3
From
extrinsic rewards
to
intrinsic needs
http://www.flickr.com/photos/diego_rivera/4261964210
Extrinsic motivation
Loyalty programs!
raffles!
gamificatioN!
Earn 1,000,000,000,000 points
Score: 964,000,000,000,000
(You rock!)
Intrinsic motivation
http://www.flickr.com/photos/areyoumyrik/308908967
What intrinsic
motivation drives
passionate users?
Pop Quiz!
The product
is awesome!
The company
is awesome!
The experience
is awesome!
A B C
Pop Quiz!
I am awesome!
D
Better X
Better user of X*
* aka »competence«
»The more you learn, the better you are at
something. The better you are, the more
engaging it is. If you can help people ...
Teresa M.Amabile
»This pattern is what we call the
progress principle: of all the positive
events that influence inner wor...
Teresa M.Amabile
»Truly effective video game designers
know how to create a sense of progress
for players within all stage...
Raph Koster
»Fun is just
another word
for learning.«
a theory of fun for game design (2005)
»Fun from games arises out
of mastery. It arises out of
comprehension. It is the act
of solving puzzles that makes
games f...
Edward Deci,Richard Ryan
»An understanding of human
motivation requires a consideration
of innate psychological needs for
...
inside <> outside of you
“want to” <> “have to”
Edward Deci & Richard Ryan: The »What« and »Why« of Gaol Pursuits (2002)
150 more pages,
and I get my 10$.
external
I must...
2
Why care
4
How to do it
1
What it is 3
How it works
Not fun Fun
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sulamith/1342528771/sizes/o/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/photonquantique/3364593...
Raph Koster
»Fun is just another word
for learning.«
through interesting challenges
a theory of fun for game design (2005)
Goals ...
+ Rules ...
Constrain actions & resources ...
= Interesting challenges
+ Feedback ...
http://www.flickr.com/photos/bodgerbrooks/1315419080
= Experiences of competence
Earn 1,000,000,000,000 points
Score: 964,000,000,000,000
(You rock!)
Feedback without challenge
AestheticsMechanics Dynamics
Hunicke,LeBlanc & Zubek
mda: a formal approach to game design (2004)
The engagement loop
Monopoly
aesthetic
Frustrating
end game
mechanic dynamic
Slow
poverty gap
+$ +
-$ -
AestheticsMechanics Dynamics
How the user experiences it
AestheticsMechanics Dynamics
How the designer creates it
Action
Goal: Understand the MDA structure of a game
1. Find a partner next to you, introduce yourself :)
2. Pick a game yo...
what did
you observe?
Experiential prototyping*
* aka “Iterate until fun”
it’s loops all the way down
engagement loop
motivation
rule system
goal/cta
success! / failure!
action/resource
feedback
challenge
+ Motivation: I wan...
tight positive feedback loops
+
+
action feedback
World of Warcraft
+
+
beat
monster
collect
loot
FarmVille
+
+
plant
field
get
harvest
every racing game
+
+
win
race
pimp
car
loops can be multi-step
feedback
action action
action
get money
buy fish feed fish
sell fish
loops are interlinked
Online at
Slides: j.mp/1hEVOfI
Video: j.mp/1hEVT38
and now ...
beyond games
Goal/CTA + Motivation
Goal/CTA+Motivation+Feedback
Goal/CTA
+
M
otivation
Goal/CTA
Also works virally ...
action feedback feedback action
FarmVille Gifting
Foursquare Mayorships
Yelp! compliments
quora
goal/cta
Follow user
goal/cta
Give thanks
motivation
Feeling helped
feedback
Get answers
action
Write question
goal/cta
An...
2
Why care
How it works
31
What it is
How to do it
4
coding conduct
Persuasive Design for digital media
95
Engagement Loop
goals
action & resource
motivation
challenge
progres...
stack overflow
actions: Writing questions
actions: voting up/down
Feedback: Reputation
progress feedback: levels
Goals & progress feedback: Badges
Goals/CTAs: Lists,subscriptions
motivation: Recognition
motivation: competence
Action/
resource
Feedback
MotivationGoal/CTA
Player Journey
Business goals User needs
challenge
Action/
resource
Feedback
MotivationGoal/CTA
Player Journey
Business goals User needs
challenge
»Linking the Elephants«
»Linking the Elephants«
Success
metrics 1-nBusiness goal x
User
behaviour
Behaviour
metrics 1-n = Result
Aaron Patzer
»What we have learned from our users is
that any game aspect has to be, at least
for finance, more oriented t...
business goals & user needs
1. Define organisational goals
2.Identify matching user needs
3. Translate goals/needs into ac...
good starting points
customer journey maps
mental models
concept models
activity chain: Eating healthy
eat
healthy
food
avoid
mindless
snacking
cook
healthy
food
shop
healthy
food
plan healthy
m...
activity chain: Eating healthy
eat
healthy
food
avoid
mindless
snacking
cook
healthy
food
shop
healthy
food
plan healthy
m...
Our Business Goal & User Need
Help people save money by defining and
sticking to financial budgets.
Action
Goal: Identify behaviour chains that satisfy the user’s needs.
1. Form teams of two at your table.
2. As your team,...
Action/
resource
Feedback
MotivationGoal/CTA
Player Journey
Business goals User needs
challenge
Is it all just
competence?
farmville
Fallout 3
physical
psycholo
gical
social
Hunger
Thirst
SexRelatedness Power
RecognitionAutonomy
Competence
Belonging
Competence
…vs.Quality andVarietyAutonomy
Relatedness
Recognition
Belonging
Power
sense pleasure
Arousal & engrossment
meaning
curiosity & surprise
Missing your user
Danger
Just ask!
A nagging problem
http://people.virginia.edu/~tdw/nisbett&wilson.pdf
Eric Schwitzgebel
»Nisbett and Wilson are not skeptics
about introspective report of conscious
experiences. They are skept...
The limits of self-report
We can report recent experiences,
general beliefs, attitudes, values
Stick to actual, current/re...
The Mao Model
research for
behavior change
Sebastian Deterding (@dingstweets)
Interaction’12
February 3, 2012, Dublin
c b
...
Laddering
Why?
Why?
Why?
Why?
Why?
Laddering
http://madpow.com/Insights/WhitePapers/Laddering--A-Research-Interview-Techni...
Action
Goal: Identify motivations underlying the target need/activity.
1. In your team, find one interviewee who recently ...
Action/
resource
Feedback
MotivationGoal/CTA
Player Journey
Business goals User needs
challenge
Danger
Stand in the user’s way
Ticket
For ticket, drag red
dot through labyrinth
Level 2
Ticket
For ticket, drag red
dot through labyrinth
Core challenge of E-Mail?
• Maximum output?
• Correct, polite, actionable?
• Prioritized?
• Fast answers?
• Check less oft...
Prioritization
Procrastination
Action
Goal: Identify a promising challenge.
1. In your teams of two, identify challenges inherent in the
activity you tar...
Action/
resource
Feedback
MotivationGoal/CTA
Player Journey
Business goals User needs
challenge
a first try
coding conduct
Persuasive Design for digital media
Storyboard
title
elements
Motivation What motivation fuels the user?
Ho...
coding conduct
Persuasive Design for digital media
id.,
,:c,r
H,
(-f.':::
v)
F
:['.
,/.f:
lFi'
I,t,;11
r-iI
trfS,
iii1ei1
...
Action
Goal: Fleshing out your ideas into storyboards
1. Individually, look at the action, motivation, and challenge
you n...
Action/
resource
Feedback
MotivationGoals
Player Journey Platform
Business goals User needs
challenge
Immediate
http://www.flickr.com/photos/wongjunhao/2852994074
“Juicy”
Glanceable
Appealing to motivations
Appealing to motivations
Surprising
Always Be Closing
Rewards?
Danger
gaming the system
the undermining effect
Danger
Edward Deci,RichardRyan
»An understanding of human motivation
requires a consideration of innate
psychological needs for c...
avoid controlling feedback
Effective,but not sustainable
Reward intrinsically*
* With more utility, mastery, autonomy, meaning, relatedness
Action
Goal: Identify ideas for improving your system.
1. Pick one principle and apply it to your design. Note your result...
progress feedback
Counter & progress bars
Levels
Check lists
Collections
Action
Goal: Identify ideas for improving your system.
1. Think about how to improve progress feedback in your design.
Not...
Action/
resource
Feedback
MotivationGoals
Player Journey Platform
Business goals User needs
challenge
remember?
S.M.A.R.T.goals
• Specific
• Measurable
• Achievable
• Relevant
• Time-based
Clear,visually present goals
Structured flow of goals
Scaffolded challenge
»flow«
Challenge
Skill/Time
frustration
boredom
flow: the psychology of optimal experience
Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi
Not just more of the same ...
…but more complex
Analyse skill loops/chains
Online at
bit.ly/8enk2P
Map level structure
Action/
resource
Feedback
MotivationGoals
Player Journey Platform
Business goals User needs
challenge
Bite-sized
Kars Alfrink
»So when designing tools
for play, underspecify!«
a playful stance (2008)
underspecified
“small pieces,loosely joined”
Action
Goal: Identify ideas for improving your system.
1. Pick one principle and apply it to your design. Note the result
...
Action/
resource
Feedback
MotivationGoals
Player Journey Platform
Business goals User needs
challenge
Onboarding
Online at
http://j.mp/1j6RYep
Action
Goal: Improve the design of your goals.
1. Identify a S.M.A.R.T. low-level goal for the concrete action
your loop c...
In summary
• To motivate user engagement sustainably, design
for intrinsic motivation
• Games show you how to design for c...
sebastian@codingconduct.cc
@dingstweets
codingconduct.cc
Thank you.
Magic Pixie Wonder Dust 3000 (Enterprise Edition): Designing Motivational Experiences
Magic Pixie Wonder Dust 3000 (Enterprise Edition): Designing Motivational Experiences
Magic Pixie Wonder Dust 3000 (Enterprise Edition): Designing Motivational Experiences
Magic Pixie Wonder Dust 3000 (Enterprise Edition): Designing Motivational Experiences
Magic Pixie Wonder Dust 3000 (Enterprise Edition): Designing Motivational Experiences
Magic Pixie Wonder Dust 3000 (Enterprise Edition): Designing Motivational Experiences
Magic Pixie Wonder Dust 3000 (Enterprise Edition): Designing Motivational Experiences
Magic Pixie Wonder Dust 3000 (Enterprise Edition): Designing Motivational Experiences
Magic Pixie Wonder Dust 3000 (Enterprise Edition): Designing Motivational Experiences
Magic Pixie Wonder Dust 3000 (Enterprise Edition): Designing Motivational Experiences
Magic Pixie Wonder Dust 3000 (Enterprise Edition): Designing Motivational Experiences
Magic Pixie Wonder Dust 3000 (Enterprise Edition): Designing Motivational Experiences
Magic Pixie Wonder Dust 3000 (Enterprise Edition): Designing Motivational Experiences
Magic Pixie Wonder Dust 3000 (Enterprise Edition): Designing Motivational Experiences
Magic Pixie Wonder Dust 3000 (Enterprise Edition): Designing Motivational Experiences
Magic Pixie Wonder Dust 3000 (Enterprise Edition): Designing Motivational Experiences
Magic Pixie Wonder Dust 3000 (Enterprise Edition): Designing Motivational Experiences
Magic Pixie Wonder Dust 3000 (Enterprise Edition): Designing Motivational Experiences
Magic Pixie Wonder Dust 3000 (Enterprise Edition): Designing Motivational Experiences
Magic Pixie Wonder Dust 3000 (Enterprise Edition): Designing Motivational Experiences
Magic Pixie Wonder Dust 3000 (Enterprise Edition): Designing Motivational Experiences
Magic Pixie Wonder Dust 3000 (Enterprise Edition): Designing Motivational Experiences
Magic Pixie Wonder Dust 3000 (Enterprise Edition): Designing Motivational Experiences
Magic Pixie Wonder Dust 3000 (Enterprise Edition): Designing Motivational Experiences
Magic Pixie Wonder Dust 3000 (Enterprise Edition): Designing Motivational Experiences
Magic Pixie Wonder Dust 3000 (Enterprise Edition): Designing Motivational Experiences
Magic Pixie Wonder Dust 3000 (Enterprise Edition): Designing Motivational Experiences
Magic Pixie Wonder Dust 3000 (Enterprise Edition): Designing Motivational Experiences
Magic Pixie Wonder Dust 3000 (Enterprise Edition): Designing Motivational Experiences
Magic Pixie Wonder Dust 3000 (Enterprise Edition): Designing Motivational Experiences
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Magic Pixie Wonder Dust 3000 (Enterprise Edition): Designing Motivational Experiences

7,567

Published on

Slides from my UX London 2014 workshop on gameful design.

7 Comments
34 Likes
Statistics
Notes
No Downloads
Views
Total Views
7,567
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
17
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
7
Likes
34
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Transcript of "Magic Pixie Wonder Dust 3000 (Enterprise Edition): Designing Motivational Experiences"

  1. 1. magic pixie wonder dust 3000 (enterprise Edition) designing motivational experiences Sebastian Deterding (@dingstweets) UX London, May 30, 2014 c b
  2. 2. 2 Why care How it works 3 4 How to do it 1 What it is
  3. 3. 2 Why care How it works 3 4 How to do it 1 What it is
  4. 4. What happened here?
  5. 5. From Usability to Motivation
  6. 6. Robert Fabricant »Behavior is our medium.« interaction’09 (2009)
  7. 7. Fitness
  8. 8. Sustainability
  9. 9. Education
  10. 10. How it works 3 4 How to do it 1 What it is Why care 2
  11. 11. From utility to psychology shift #1
  12. 12. utility usability the great beyond New market differentiators Meaning Emotion Transformation Experience Pleasure Identity
  13. 13. Buy! new value chains Upload! Comment! Tag! Digg! Forward! Invite! Bookmark! Retweet! Share! Add friend! Design! Mark as Spam! Like! Answer! Vote! Register Now! Subscribe!
  14. 14. New markets health self- improvement eco/green
  15. 15. From rational actor to social animal Shift #2
  16. 16. + Then: The Rational Actor
  17. 17. Now: The Social Animal
  18. 18. Poor choices/actions are due to ... rational actor social animal Lack of information Misaligned incentives Motivation Emotion Cognitive biases Habit Social influence Material environment
  19. 19. shift #3 From extrinsic rewards to intrinsic needs
  20. 20. http://www.flickr.com/photos/diego_rivera/4261964210 Extrinsic motivation
  21. 21. Loyalty programs!
  22. 22. raffles!
  23. 23. gamificatioN!
  24. 24. Earn 1,000,000,000,000 points Score: 964,000,000,000,000 (You rock!)
  25. 25. Intrinsic motivation http://www.flickr.com/photos/areyoumyrik/308908967
  26. 26. What intrinsic motivation drives passionate users?
  27. 27. Pop Quiz! The product is awesome! The company is awesome! The experience is awesome! A B C
  28. 28. Pop Quiz! I am awesome! D
  29. 29. Better X Better user of X* * aka »competence«
  30. 30. »The more you learn, the better you are at something. The better you are, the more engaging it is. If you can help people have more of that feeling, they won’t talk about how good you are – they'll talk about how much they kick ass.« Kathy Sierra upgrade your users, not your product (2005)
  31. 31. Teresa M.Amabile »This pattern is what we call the progress principle: of all the positive events that influence inner work life, the single most powerful is progress in meaningful work.« the progress principle (2012: 76)
  32. 32. Teresa M.Amabile »Truly effective video game designers know how to create a sense of progress for players within all stages of the game. Truly effective managers know how to do the same for their subordinates.« the progress principle (2012: 88)
  33. 33. Raph Koster »Fun is just another word for learning.« a theory of fun for game design (2005)
  34. 34. »Fun from games arises out of mastery. It arises out of comprehension. It is the act of solving puzzles that makes games fun.« Raph Koster a theory of fun for game design (2005)
  35. 35. Edward Deci,Richard Ryan »An understanding of human motivation requires a consideration of innate psychological needs for competence, autonomy, and relatedness.« the what and why of goal pursuit (2000)
  36. 36. inside <> outside of you “want to” <> “have to”
  37. 37. Edward Deci & Richard Ryan: The »What« and »Why« of Gaol Pursuits (2002) 150 more pages, and I get my 10$. external I must not disappoint my parents! introjected Pfff … I‘m bored. amotivated I‘m good at this – this is actually fun! intrinsic It‘s important for me in school to read this now. identified I totally see how this helps me become a chef! integrated http://www.flickr.com/photos/pensiero/95412049Edward Deci & Richard Ryan (2002), The »What« and »Why« of Goal Pursuits
  38. 38. 2 Why care 4 How to do it 1 What it is 3 How it works
  39. 39. Not fun Fun http://www.flickr.com/photos/sulamith/1342528771/sizes/o/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/photonquantique/3364593945/sizes/l/
  40. 40. Raph Koster »Fun is just another word for learning.« through interesting challenges a theory of fun for game design (2005)
  41. 41. Goals ...
  42. 42. + Rules ...
  43. 43. Constrain actions & resources ...
  44. 44. = Interesting challenges
  45. 45. + Feedback ... http://www.flickr.com/photos/bodgerbrooks/1315419080
  46. 46. = Experiences of competence
  47. 47. Earn 1,000,000,000,000 points Score: 964,000,000,000,000 (You rock!) Feedback without challenge
  48. 48. AestheticsMechanics Dynamics Hunicke,LeBlanc & Zubek mda: a formal approach to game design (2004) The engagement loop
  49. 49. Monopoly aesthetic Frustrating end game mechanic dynamic Slow poverty gap +$ + -$ -
  50. 50. AestheticsMechanics Dynamics How the user experiences it
  51. 51. AestheticsMechanics Dynamics How the designer creates it
  52. 52. Action Goal: Understand the MDA structure of a game 1. Find a partner next to you, introduce yourself :) 2. Pick a game you both like (Poker, Scrabble, Twister, Sim City, Settlers of Catan: everything goes). 3. Pick one specific fun moment you experience playing the game. 4. Discuss: What mechanics (goals, rules, actions, feedback) and dynamics enable this dynamic?
  53. 53. what did you observe?
  54. 54. Experiential prototyping* * aka “Iterate until fun”
  55. 55. it’s loops all the way down
  56. 56. engagement loop motivation rule system goal/cta success! / failure! action/resource feedback challenge + Motivation: I want to do more! + Ability (Resource, skill): I can do more! + Goal/CTA: There’s more to do!
  57. 57. tight positive feedback loops + + action feedback
  58. 58. World of Warcraft + + beat monster collect loot
  59. 59. FarmVille + + plant field get harvest
  60. 60. every racing game + + win race pimp car
  61. 61. loops can be multi-step feedback action action action
  62. 62. get money buy fish feed fish sell fish
  63. 63. loops are interlinked
  64. 64. Online at Slides: j.mp/1hEVOfI Video: j.mp/1hEVT38
  65. 65. and now ... beyond games
  66. 66. Goal/CTA + Motivation Goal/CTA+Motivation+Feedback Goal/CTA + M otivation Goal/CTA
  67. 67. Also works virally ... action feedback feedback action
  68. 68. FarmVille Gifting
  69. 69. Foursquare Mayorships
  70. 70. Yelp! compliments
  71. 71. quora
  72. 72. goal/cta Follow user goal/cta Give thanks motivation Feeling helped feedback Get answers action Write question goal/cta Answer question motivation Competence feedback Get thanks action Write answer goal/cta Follow user goal/cta Answer question motivation Recognition feedback Content, backfollow action Follow user
  73. 73. 2 Why care How it works 31 What it is How to do it 4
  74. 74. coding conduct Persuasive Design for digital media 95 Engagement Loop goals action & resource motivation challenge progress feedback immediate feedback business goal user goals player journey
  75. 75. stack overflow
  76. 76. actions: Writing questions
  77. 77. actions: voting up/down
  78. 78. Feedback: Reputation
  79. 79. progress feedback: levels
  80. 80. Goals & progress feedback: Badges
  81. 81. Goals/CTAs: Lists,subscriptions
  82. 82. motivation: Recognition
  83. 83. motivation: competence
  84. 84. Action/ resource Feedback MotivationGoal/CTA Player Journey Business goals User needs challenge
  85. 85. Action/ resource Feedback MotivationGoal/CTA Player Journey Business goals User needs challenge
  86. 86. »Linking the Elephants«
  87. 87. »Linking the Elephants« Success metrics 1-nBusiness goal x User behaviour Behaviour metrics 1-n = Result
  88. 88. Aaron Patzer »What we have learned from our users is that any game aspect has to be, at least for finance, more oriented toward some specific thing that you are working toward: I want to buy a house or a car, take a vacation, get out of debt ...« founder, mint.com (2010) http://www.thestreet.com/story/10944765/3/business-looks-to-win-at-gamification.html
  89. 89. business goals & user needs 1. Define organisational goals 2.Identify matching user needs 3. Translate goals/needs into activities 4.Translate activities into measurable concrete behaviours & qualities: What do users do how?
  90. 90. good starting points customer journey maps mental models concept models
  91. 91. activity chain: Eating healthy eat healthy food avoid mindless snacking cook healthy food shop healthy food plan healthy meals
  92. 92. activity chain: Eating healthy eat healthy food avoid mindless snacking cook healthy food shop healthy food plan healthy meals actor a actor b
  93. 93. Our Business Goal & User Need Help people save money by defining and sticking to financial budgets.
  94. 94. Action Goal: Identify behaviour chains that satisfy the user’s needs. 1. Form teams of two at your table. 2. As your team, draw the behaviour chains for setting and achieving a financial budget. 2. Pick one step/behaviour that you consider crucial and note it under “Actions/Resources”.
  95. 95. Action/ resource Feedback MotivationGoal/CTA Player Journey Business goals User needs challenge
  96. 96. Is it all just competence?
  97. 97. farmville
  98. 98. Fallout 3
  99. 99. physical psycholo gical social Hunger Thirst SexRelatedness Power RecognitionAutonomy Competence Belonging
  100. 100. Competence
  101. 101. …vs.Quality andVarietyAutonomy
  102. 102. Relatedness
  103. 103. Recognition
  104. 104. Belonging
  105. 105. Power
  106. 106. sense pleasure
  107. 107. Arousal & engrossment
  108. 108. meaning
  109. 109. curiosity & surprise
  110. 110. Missing your user Danger
  111. 111. Just ask!
  112. 112. A nagging problem http://people.virginia.edu/~tdw/nisbett&wilson.pdf
  113. 113. Eric Schwitzgebel »Nisbett and Wilson are not skeptics about introspective report of conscious experiences. They are skeptics about introspective knowledge of the causes of those experiences.« the nisbett-wilson myth (2006) http://schwitzsplinters.blogspot.com/2006/10/nisbett-wilson-myth.html
  114. 114. The limits of self-report We can report recent experiences, general beliefs, attitudes, values Stick to actual, current/recent experiences We fail at detailed memory, future action, irrelevant things, unconscious processes Ask for connected attitudes, values, needs, but don‘t jump to conclusions
  115. 115. The Mao Model research for behavior change Sebastian Deterding (@dingstweets) Interaction’12 February 3, 2012, Dublin c b Online at http://j.mp/ maomodel
  116. 116. Laddering Why? Why? Why? Why? Why? Laddering http://madpow.com/Insights/WhitePapers/Laddering--A-Research-Interview-Technique.aspx
  117. 117. Action Goal: Identify motivations underlying the target need/activity. 1. In your team, find one interviewee who recently did/wanted to do your target need/activity. The other is the interviewer. 2. The interviewers ask: Remember the last time you (wanted to) do X. Why was it important? Why was that important? Etc. 3. Share your findings at your table. Pick the most frequently mentioned/promising motivation and note it down under “Motivation”.
  118. 118. Action/ resource Feedback MotivationGoal/CTA Player Journey Business goals User needs challenge
  119. 119. Danger Stand in the user’s way
  120. 120. Ticket For ticket, drag red dot through labyrinth
  121. 121. Level 2 Ticket For ticket, drag red dot through labyrinth
  122. 122. Core challenge of E-Mail? • Maximum output? • Correct, polite, actionable? • Prioritized? • Fast answers? • Check less often? • Inbox Zero?
  123. 123. Prioritization
  124. 124. Procrastination
  125. 125. Action Goal: Identify a promising challenge. 1. In your teams of two, identify challenges inherent in the activity you targeted – things that (a) are not due to poor usability etc., (b) the user can learn to get better at. 2. Pick a promising challenge and note it under “Challenge”.
  126. 126. Action/ resource Feedback MotivationGoal/CTA Player Journey Business goals User needs challenge a first try
  127. 127. coding conduct Persuasive Design for digital media Storyboard title elements Motivation What motivation fuels the user? How is that motivation satisfied? Goal/call to action What goal does the user pursue? How is it suggested to the user? Action & resource What does the user do with what to achieve that goal? Challenge What’s the learnable challenge? What are rules & constraints? Immediate feedback How does the user learn about the success of her action? Progress feedback How does the user learn about her progress toward her motive over time? core idea 154
  128. 128. coding conduct Persuasive Design for digital media id., ,:c,r H, (-f.'::: v) F :['. ,/.f: lFi' I,t,;11 r-iI trfS, iii1ei1 i=ls|:: I,l,,l r-FS IN ?ri s$ l:r FjS I's: II(.s:rt l;:: ,pA. ,.F.s + ;3js-{ :Zniil '3:o;- '.*t rS, :$, .S'i_n:: ]S f, r!i|, H rL $ t-:i fl: s..(l 6 FiiErgE ,f HfF$$' iri+E[{l{[li:1;F+&ds' r 'SF.t
  129. 129. Action Goal: Fleshing out your ideas into storyboards 1. Individually, look at the action, motivation, and challenge you noted in your engagement loop diagram. 2. Either just fleshing out or taking a fresh start, in your group or individually, draw a storyboard that illustrates how your engagement loop works. (We will present some designs from those who want.)
  130. 130. Action/ resource Feedback MotivationGoals Player Journey Platform Business goals User needs challenge
  131. 131. Immediate http://www.flickr.com/photos/wongjunhao/2852994074
  132. 132. “Juicy”
  133. 133. Glanceable
  134. 134. Appealing to motivations
  135. 135. Appealing to motivations
  136. 136. Surprising
  137. 137. Always Be Closing
  138. 138. Rewards?
  139. 139. Danger gaming the system
  140. 140. the undermining effect Danger
  141. 141. Edward Deci,RichardRyan »An understanding of human motivation requires a consideration of innate psychological needs for competence, autonomy, and relatedness.« the what and why of goal pursuit (2000)
  142. 142. avoid controlling feedback
  143. 143. Effective,but not sustainable
  144. 144. Reward intrinsically* * With more utility, mastery, autonomy, meaning, relatedness
  145. 145. Action Goal: Identify ideas for improving your system. 1. Pick one principle and apply it to your design. Note your result under “Immediate Feedback”. häppchengrösse To foster the experience of competence, good feedback is juicy. •How might you provide an excessive maximum of output on a minimum of input while still being functional? •How might your feedback speak to all senses? juicy unterbestimmtheit Good feedback elicits the emotions and motivations that drive the activity. •What motivations and emotions driver your users to engage in your target activity? •How can you appeal to them in image, sound, text? appealing to motives
  146. 146. progress feedback
  147. 147. Counter & progress bars
  148. 148. Levels
  149. 149. Check lists
  150. 150. Collections
  151. 151. Action Goal: Identify ideas for improving your system. 1. Think about how to improve progress feedback in your design. Note the results under “Progress Feedback.” unterbestimmtheit Good feedback makes the current status and progress of the user graspable. •How might you make sensual, tactile what the user has already achieved? •How might you use progress indicators to suggest next goals to the user? graspable progress
  152. 152. Action/ resource Feedback MotivationGoals Player Journey Platform Business goals User needs challenge
  153. 153. remember?
  154. 154. S.M.A.R.T.goals • Specific • Measurable • Achievable • Relevant • Time-based
  155. 155. Clear,visually present goals
  156. 156. Structured flow of goals
  157. 157. Scaffolded challenge
  158. 158. »flow« Challenge Skill/Time frustration boredom flow: the psychology of optimal experience Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi
  159. 159. Not just more of the same ...
  160. 160. …but more complex
  161. 161. Analyse skill loops/chains Online at bit.ly/8enk2P
  162. 162. Map level structure
  163. 163. Action/ resource Feedback MotivationGoals Player Journey Platform Business goals User needs challenge
  164. 164. Bite-sized
  165. 165. Kars Alfrink »So when designing tools for play, underspecify!« a playful stance (2008)
  166. 166. underspecified
  167. 167. “small pieces,loosely joined”
  168. 168. Action Goal: Identify ideas for improving your system. 1. Pick one principle and apply it to your design. Note the result under “Action/resource”. häppchengrösse Well-designed actions are split into an immediately doable size that gives the good feeling of having accomplished something. •How might you split activities into immediately doable chunks? •How might you reduce actions into single clicks/ swipes? bite sized unterbestimmtheit To invite exploration and creativity, good resources have no clearly prescribed space of possible uses and configurations. •How might you leave blanks to fill out for your users? •How might you design resources so that you cannot fully predict what users will do with them? under- specification
  169. 169. Action/ resource Feedback MotivationGoals Player Journey Platform Business goals User needs challenge
  170. 170. Onboarding
  171. 171. Online at http://j.mp/1j6RYep
  172. 172. Action Goal: Improve the design of your goals. 1. Identify a S.M.A.R.T. low-level goal for the concrete action your loop contains. Note down your ideas under “Goal/CTA”. 2. Identify 3 high-level goals for your idea that are successively more complex in the skills they require. 3. For the way to your first high-level goal, identify 3-5 in- between goals, starting with the basest necessary skill/ability and working your way to the complexity of the high-level goal. Note the results under “Player Journey”.
  173. 173. In summary • To motivate user engagement sustainably, design for intrinsic motivation • Games show you how to design for competence • Find the user’s needs behind using your service • Identify the activities and their learnable challenge she has to master on that way • Devise and prototype interlinked engagement loops that path the user’s way
  174. 174. sebastian@codingconduct.cc @dingstweets codingconduct.cc Thank you.

×