Kindergarten parent orientation
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Kindergarten parent orientation

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-Important information for parents who were not able to attend the orientation.

-Important information for parents who were not able to attend the orientation.

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Kindergarten parent orientation Kindergarten parent orientation Presentation Transcript

  • Wapping Elementary School
    Kindergarten Parent Orientation
  • Mrs. Laura Hickson School Principal
    Mrs. Shari Jackson Kindergarten Teacher
    Mrs. Susan Nadeau School Nurse
    Mrs. Jennifer SanzoPTO
    Greetings and Introductions
    • School Telephone Number:
    (860) 648-5010
    • Email:
    first initial and last name @swindsor.k12.ct.us
    • District Website: http://www.southwindsorschools.org
    See the Wapping webpage under “Our Schools”
    Contact Information
    • AM Kindergarten 8:45-11:30
    • PM Kindergarten 12:35-3:20
    School Hours
  •  Parent/guardian must send a written request to the teacher stating when the student is to be released and with whom.
     Students will only be dismissed through the school office (or the gymnasium at 3:20) and the parent/guardian is to be instructed to come to the school office or the gymnasium to pick up the student.
    Dismissal
  • TRIBES - A New Way of Learning and Being Together
    A TRIBES school is a learning community where teachers, administrators, students, and parents all enjoy the mutual respect and caring essential for growth and learning. The Tribes process uses four agreements that are essential to building community and establishing a positive environment for learning.
    The Agreements Are:
    Attentive Listening
    Appreciations / No Put Downs
    Participation / Right to Pass
    Mutual Respect
    TRIBES:
  • The Bucket Filling concept:
    • Each of us has an invisible bucket that is constantly being filled or emptied, depending on what others say or do. When our bucket is full, we feel great. We fill buckets by saying or doing things to others to increase their positive emotions - when we do this we also fill our own buckets.
    • We dip from others’ buckets by doing or saying things that decrease their positive emotions – we also diminish our own. It’s an important choice – one that profoundly influences our relationships, productivity, health, and happiness.
    Have You Filled A Bucket Today?By Carol McCloud
  • Every student entering kindergarten must have a physical examination completed within one year prior to entry. The State Health Assessment Form must be completed and submitted to your child’s school before the first day of attendance. All items with an asterisk (*) on the Health Assessment Record must be completely filled out by the physician, advanced practice registered nurse, registered nurse, or physician assistant performing the health assessments (PA 04-221).
    Health Information
  • AUTHORIZATION OF MEDICATION
    No prescription or over-the-counter medication may be administered without:
    1. the written order of a licensed physician, licensed dentist, a licensed advanced practice registered nurse, or licensed physician assistant; and
    2. the written authorization of a parent or guardian.
    Parents or a designated responsible adult must supply and deliver to the school nurse the medication in the original container. Students may not transport medication.
    Health Information
  • STUDENTS AT CONNECTICUT SCHOOLS 2010-2011 SCHOOL YEAR
    KINDERGARTEN
    DTaP: At least 4 doses. The last dose must be given on or after 4th birthday
    Polio: At least 3 doses. The last dose must be given on or after 4th birthday
    MMR: 2 doses: one on or after the 1st birthdayand 2nd given at least 4 weeks after the first dose
    Hib: Children less than 5 yrs of age need 1 dose at 12 months or older Children 5 and older do not need proof of Hib vaccination
    Hep B: 3 doses
    Varicella: 2 dose first on or after the 1st birthday or verification of disease
    Health Information
  • In compliance with Connecticut State Law, acetaminophen (aspirin-free pain reliever) may be administered by and at the discretion of the school nurse. Your signature on the emergency form is required to authorize administration of acetaminophen.
    Health Information
  • SNACK/HEALTHY HABITS:
     Healthful snacks in appropriate portions will be encouraged.
     Healthful party menus and nonfood alternatives for celebrations will be encouraged.
     Physical activity will be encouraged in classroom routines.
     Students will be encouraged to wash their hands.
    PLEASE SEND SNACKS THAT YOUR CHILD IS ABLE TO OPEN INDEPENDENTLY.
    BATHROOM: Please dress your child, for school, in clothing that is easy to manage when using the bathroom independently. Your child will be encouraged to put on his/her outdoor clothing independently.
    BACKPACKS: Please send your child to school with a backpack or tote bag that will easily hold a standard-sized folder.
    SUPPLIES: School supplies (crayons, pencils, markers, etc.) will be provided.
    General Information
  • “Getting Your Child Ready For Kindergarten”Connecticut State Department of Education
    Before Your Child Enters School, He Or She Should Be Able To: Dress himself or herself independently.
    To Help Your Child Be Ready for Kindergarten, You Can: Practice putting on clothes and using buttons, zippers and snaps.
  • Several longitudinal studies have found that early rhyming skills are highly correlated with later reading and spelling ability. Parents are encouraged to read and reread nursery rhymes to children. Please review the article found in your packet, “Why Kindergarteners Still Need Mother Goose Rhymes”.
    Nursery Rhymes
  • “Getting Your Child Ready For Kindergarten”Connecticut State Department of Education
    Before Your Child Enters School, He Or She Should Be Able To: Make simple rhymes.
    To Help Your Child Be Ready for Kindergarten, You Can: Say and sing nursery rhymes. Read books and poems with a rhyming pattern. Ask your child to repeat words that rhyme. Help children to create nonsense rhymes.
  • Developmental Stages of WritingAt the Beginning of Kindergarten:
    Preliterate: Scribbling
    • scribbles but intends it as writing
    • scribbling resembles writing
    • holds and uses pencil like an adult
  • Developmental Stages of WritingIn the Middle of Kindergarten:
    Beginning Sounds
    Emerge
    • children begin
    to see the differences
    between a letter and a word,
    but they may not use spacing between words.
    • message makes sense
    and matches the picture,
    especially when they choose
    the topic.
  • Developmental Stages of WritingAt the End of Kindergarten:
    Transitional Spelling:
    • readable and
    approaches conventional
    spelling.
    • writing is interspersed
    with words that are in
    standard form and have
    standard letter patterns.
  • “Getting Your Child Ready For Kindergarten”Connecticut State Department of Education
    Before Your Child Enters School, He Or She Should Be Able To: Recognize some letters and use pencils makers and crayons to draw and write.
    To Help Your Child Be Ready for Kindergarten, You Can: Point out letters that are in your child’s name. Put magnetic letters on the refrigerator for your child to use. Allow scribble writing. Provide other opportunities to write.
  • Handwriting Without Tears® aims to make legible and fluent handwriting an easy and automatic skill for all students.
    Uses unique strategies to teach good letter formation, spacing and neatness (wet, dry, try).
    Engaging techniques and activities that help improve a child’s early self-confidence, pencil grip, and body awareness skills.
    Instructional methods that use fun, entertaining, and educationally sound principles.
    Handwriting Without Tears
  • “Getting Your Child Ready For Kindergarten”Connecticut State Department of Education
    Before Your Child Enters School, He Or She Should Be Able To: Recognize and print his/her name.
    To Help Your Child Be Ready for Kindergarten, You Can: Allow your child to print his/her name whenever possible. Encourage your child to write or trace his/her name using upper case letters only at the beginning.
  • Guided Reading Level ATypically at the Beginning of Kindergarten
    Holds book and turns pages independently
    Points to words, consistent one to one match
    Controls directionality
    Uses Cues (picture, sentences) most of the time
    “Yes! Yes! Yes!”
  • Controls directionality on one line of text.
    Demonstrates and understanding of the terms begins, ends and letter.
    I can see a green frog.
    Guided Reading Level 2Typically in the Middle of Kindergarten
  • “Look at the rain,” said Dad.
    “Get your umbrella.”
    Kim looked in the closet.
    “No umbrella,” she said.
    Guided Reading Level 4Typically at the End of Kindergarten
    Reads in longer phrases, at times
    At difficulty, uses multiple cues to problem solve unknown words
    Identifies and connects at least four key events from the beginning, middle and end in sequence
    Uses important language from the text while retelling
    Gives an opinion about the story that reflects a deeper understanding
    Makes a thoughtful connection to the story
  • “Getting Your Child Ready For Kindergarten”Connecticut State Department of Education
    Before Your Child Enters School, He Or She Should Be Able To: Handle books appropriately.
    To Help Your Child Be Ready for Kindergarten, You Can: Read books, often, with your child so he/she will begin to understand book handling and print concepts (Print is read from left to right, return sweep, tracking, etc.).
  • Counting and Cardinality
    • Know number names and the count sequence.
    • Count to tell the number of objects.
    • Compare numbers.
    Operations and Algebraic Thinking
    • Understand addition as putting together and
    adding to, and understand subtraction as
    taking apart and taking from.
    Number and Operations in Base Ten
    • Work with numbers 11–19 to gain foundations
    for place value.
    Measurement and Data
    • Describe and compare measurable attributes.
    • Classify objects and count the number of
    objects in categories.
    Geometry
    • Identify and describe shapes.
    • Analyze, compare, create, and compose
    shapes.
    Common Core Standards OverviewMathematics
  • “Getting Your Child Ready For Kindergarten”Connecticut State Department of Education
    Before Your Child Enters School, He Or She Should Be Able To: Recognize some numbers.
    To Help Your Child Be Ready for Kindergarten, You Can: Look for numbers in books or magazines. Go on a number hunt. Hide magnetic numbers for your child to find.
  • Art Mrs. Critton or Mr. Arey
    Music Mrs. Gasta
    Gym Mrs. Fox
    Library Mrs. Mullen
    *Children will attend specials, each day. One special will generally rotate.
    Kindergarten Specials
  • Volunteers are an extremely important resource and are appreciated by classroom teachers and other school personnel.
    The Parent Teacher Organization assists in volunteer orientation and recruitment.
    Volunteers are used in many ways to supplement and enrich our school programs.
    Volunteering
  • Bus Ride: May 24th at 10:35
    Meet and Greet : TBA
    Upcoming Events
  • We are happy to help. Please ask.
    Questions???
  • Thank you for coming!
    Please take a few minutes to visit the kindergarten classroom. We look forward to working with your child and your family!
    Thank You!