Unit 3: Sport Facility Management and Event Planning

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Unit 3: Sport Facility Management and Event Planning

  1. 1. Unit 3:Unit 3: Facility and Event PlanningFacility and Event Planning Mr. ElsesserMr. Elsesser Sports ManagementSports Management
  2. 2. Unit Overview:Unit Overview: • Facilities Management and OverviewFacilities Management and Overview • Event Planning and Types of PlansEvent Planning and Types of Plans • Importance of PlanningImportance of Planning • Sales ForecastingSales Forecasting • SchedulingScheduling • Scheduling ToolsScheduling Tools
  3. 3. Sport Facilities ManagementSport Facilities Management • The Role of the Facilities Manager isThe Role of the Facilities Manager is very complex and demandingvery complex and demanding • Involves Several Functions:Involves Several Functions: • Manager’s Main Goal:Manager’s Main Goal: • Importance:Importance:
  4. 4. Sport Facilities Management:Sport Facilities Management: Facility PlanningFacility Planning • Requires the Manager and CommitteeRequires the Manager and Committee • Follows a 3 step process:Follows a 3 step process: – An architect is hired to decide criteriaAn architect is hired to decide criteria – After plans and financing is secured, a biddingAfter plans and financing is secured, a bidding process for jobs is completed to stay withinprocess for jobs is completed to stay within budget.budget. – Facility Planning manager must constantly giveFacility Planning manager must constantly give attention to project.attention to project.
  5. 5. Meet Mike CrumMeet Mike Crum COO and Former Interim Director ofCOO and Former Interim Director of Charlotte’s Auditorium/Coliseum–ConventionCharlotte’s Auditorium/Coliseum–Convention Center AuthorityCenter Authority • Presided over a $25 million budget, 200Presided over a $25 million budget, 200 employees (and another 1800 part-timeemployees (and another 1800 part-time workers), and all maintenance and operationsworkers), and all maintenance and operations for the Charlotte Convention Center, Charlottefor the Charlotte Convention Center, Charlotte Coliseum, Ovens Auditorium, and CricketColiseum, Ovens Auditorium, and Cricket Arena.Arena. • ““Constantly putting out fires”Constantly putting out fires” • "You're never really off," Crum noted. "That"You're never really off," Crum noted. "That takes awhile to get used to. It's a big job. I amtakes awhile to get used to. It's a big job. I am always going to some sort of meeting.”always going to some sort of meeting.”
  6. 6. Professional FacilityProfessional Facility Management FirmsManagement Firms • In 1976, the Louisiana Superdome became theIn 1976, the Louisiana Superdome became the first major sporting facility to use outsidefirst major sporting facility to use outside professionals to manage its operations.professionals to manage its operations. • Currently, the New Orleans Superdome isCurrently, the New Orleans Superdome is managed by SMG.managed by SMG. • Philadelphia-based SMG is the world’s leadingPhiladelphia-based SMG is the world’s leading company in the management of publiccompany in the management of public facilities, including stadiums, arenas, theaters,facilities, including stadiums, arenas, theaters, and exhibition/convention centers.and exhibition/convention centers.
  7. 7. • SMG manages stadiums, arenas and civic centers acrossSMG manages stadiums, arenas and civic centers across the United States, in Puerto Rico, Canada and Europe,the United States, in Puerto Rico, Canada and Europe, which host virtually every type of arena-oriented eventwhich host virtually every type of arena-oriented event imaginable.imaginable. • More than 1.5 million managed seatsMore than 1.5 million managed seats, SMG arenas, SMG arenas stage everything:stage everything: – Professional basketballProfessional basketball – Professional hockeyProfessional hockey – Minor league sporting eventsMinor league sporting events – NCAA collegiate sporting eventsNCAA collegiate sporting events – Family shows such as Disney on Ice and Ringling Bros./BarnumFamily shows such as Disney on Ice and Ringling Bros./Barnum and Bailey Circusand Bailey Circus – Plus the biggest concert tours of the biggest names in musicPlus the biggest concert tours of the biggest names in music
  8. 8. Sport Facilities Management:Sport Facilities Management: What makes a venue attractive?What makes a venue attractive? • 3 Main Categories:3 Main Categories: – AmenitiesAmenities – Ticket Package Options and AvailabilityTicket Package Options and Availability – Entertainment valueEntertainment value • Product on and off the fieldProduct on and off the field
  9. 9. Event PlanningEvent Planning • Sports Managers plan many types of events.Sports Managers plan many types of events. • They Include:They Include: – Coordinating GamesCoordinating Games – Providing food for teamsProviding food for teams – Arrange Team TransportationArrange Team Transportation – Hire OfficialsHire Officials – Manage Ticket SalesManage Ticket Sales – Plan and Monitor Concession SalesPlan and Monitor Concession Sales – Juggle League SchedulesJuggle League Schedules – Organize TournamentsOrganize Tournaments
  10. 10. Types of PlanningTypes of Planning • Plans are characterized by five dimensions:Plans are characterized by five dimensions: Management Level Type of Plan Scope Time Repetitiveness Upper andUpper and MiddleMiddle StrategicStrategic BroadBroad Long-RangeLong-Range Single-UseSingle-Use PlanPlan Middle andMiddle and LowerLower OperationalOperational NarrowNarrow Short-RangeShort-Range StandingStanding PlanPlan
  11. 11. Standing PlansStanding Plans • Used to achieve objectives laid out in anUsed to achieve objectives laid out in an organization’s strategy.organization’s strategy. • Definition:Definition: – Policies, procedures, and rules for handlingPolicies, procedures, and rules for handling situations that arise repeatedly.situations that arise repeatedly. • Policies:Policies: • Procedures:Procedures: • Rules:Rules:
  12. 12. Single-Use PlansSingle-Use Plans • Include programs and budgets that addressInclude programs and budgets that address non-repetitive situations.non-repetitive situations. • Program:Program: – Program Development Steps:Program Development Steps: 1)1) Set broad objectives, 2) Break down project into specificSet broad objectives, 2) Break down project into specific goals, 3) Assign responsibility for each goal, 4) Establishgoals, 3) Assign responsibility for each goal, 4) Establish start/end times for each, 5) Determine the resourcesstart/end times for each, 5) Determine the resources neededneeded • Budget:Budget:
  13. 13. Contingency PlansContingency Plans • What are Contingency Plans?What are Contingency Plans? • Wise coaches/managers take greatWise coaches/managers take great pains to develop and recruit backuppains to develop and recruit backup players/employees who can and will beplayers/employees who can and will be ready to step in should a first-stringready to step in should a first-string player/employee get injured or call inplayer/employee get injured or call in sick.sick.
  14. 14. How to Develop aHow to Develop a Contingency PlanContingency Plan • Contingency Plans can beContingency Plans can be developed by asking/answeringdeveloped by asking/answering three questions:three questions: – What Might Go Wrong?What Might Go Wrong? – How can I prevent it from happening?How can I prevent it from happening? – If it does occur, what can I do toIf it does occur, what can I do to minimize the effect?minimize the effect?
  15. 15. Planning is your LIFELINEPlanning is your LIFELINE • ““When you fail to plan, you plan to fail.”When you fail to plan, you plan to fail.” • Flags that Indicate Poor Performance: – Objectives that are not metObjectives that are not met – Continual crisesContinual crises – Idle resourcesIdle resources – Lack of resourcesLack of resources – DuplicationDuplication
  16. 16. Sales ForecastingSales Forecasting • Sales forecast predicts the dollar amount ofSales forecast predicts the dollar amount of product that will be sold during a specified period.product that will be sold during a specified period. • Why do we Care? • Our Overall Aim:Our Overall Aim: – Market share:Market share:
  17. 17. How is Sales ForecastingHow is Sales Forecasting carried out?carried out? • Qualitative Sales Forecasting: – Subjective method that predicts sales through: • Subjective Judgment • Intuition • Experience • Individual Opinion – Primary Uses:
  18. 18. How is Sales ForecastingHow is Sales Forecasting carried out?carried out? • Quantitative Sales Forecasting: – Objective method that predicts sales through: • Uses Objective Techniques – Mathematical – Past Sales Data – Primary Uses:
  19. 19. The Importance of SchedulingThe Importance of Scheduling • Why Event Organizers Schedule? • Scheduling: – Process of listing essential activities in sequence with the time needed to complete each activity. • Details of schedule answer Who, What, Where, When, and Why questions.
  20. 20. Scheduling ToolsScheduling Tools • Calendars • Daily TO-DO List • Planning Sheets: – Planning sheets state an objective and list the sequence of activities, when each activity will begin and end, and who will complete each activity to meet the objective. – When Do I Use?
  21. 21. Planning Sheet ExamplePlanning Sheet Example
  22. 22. Scheduling ToolsScheduling Tools • Gantt Charts: – Uses bars to graphically illustrate progress on a project. • Activities are shown on the vertical axis and time is shown on the horizontal access. – When Do I Use?
  23. 23. Gantt Chart ExampleGantt Chart Example
  24. 24. Scheduling ToolsScheduling Tools • PERTPERT – (Performance Evaluation and Review Technique)(Performance Evaluation and Review Technique) – Diagrams that highlight theDiagrams that highlight the interdependence of activities byinterdependence of activities by diagramming their “network.”diagramming their “network.” – When Do I Use?
  25. 25. PERT Chart ExamplePERT Chart Example
  26. 26. Why use Scheduling Tools?Why use Scheduling Tools? • Effective Time ManagementEffective Time Management – Time Management: • Techniques that enable people to get more done in less time with better results. • Biggest Time Management Issue:
  27. 27. Time Management SystemsTime Management Systems • The process of planning each week,The process of planning each week, scheduling each week, scheduling eachscheduling each week, scheduling each day.day. – 4 Key Components of Effective TM Systems:4 Key Components of Effective TM Systems: • PrioritizePrioritize • Set ObjectivesSet Objectives • Plan: (How are your going to fulfill your objectives)Plan: (How are your going to fulfill your objectives) – Don’t skip this step!Don’t skip this step! • Make a schedule!Make a schedule! – Use your scheduling tools!Use your scheduling tools!

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