Plant & Microbe Interaction - plant roots

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mycorrhizae, hartig net, ectomycorrhizae, endomycorrhizae, epiphytic plants, rhizobium

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Plant & Microbe Interaction - plant roots

  1. 1. Plant & Microbe Interaction b.stev plant roots
  2. 2. THE “root” of 95% of plants have adapted fungal growth that enhances their survival KNOWN AS: mycorrhizae , it is a beneficial relationship for the fungus as the plant releases some sugars & amino acids from the process of photosynthesis (Wikipedia, 2008)
  3. 3. <ul><li>HOW this help’s the plant : </li></ul><ul><li>fungus metabolism, provides the plant with </li></ul><ul><li>phosphate that it can NOT absorb from soil </li></ul><ul><li>fungus creates a WEB like formation called: </li></ul><ul><li>a HARTIG NET around & between roots </li></ul><ul><li>- increases the absorbance: H 2 O/ nutrients </li></ul><ul><li>- more tolerant & competitive to environment </li></ul><ul><li>- increased resistance: > drought </li></ul><ul><li>> poor soil </li></ul><ul><li>> disease </li></ul><ul><li>> stresses </li></ul><ul><li>HARTIG NET : also structure / support to PLANT </li></ul><ul><li>“ litter layers ” : are formed that encourage the </li></ul><ul><li>production of enzymes – aids digestion of soil </li></ul>
  4. 4. 2 TYPES of fungal growth on plant root/s : <ul><li>THE growth either: </li></ul><ul><li>en-sheaths the root , the growth extends </li></ul><ul><li>into spaced areas of the root cortex ALSO. </li></ul><ul><li>KNOWN as: [ ectomycorrhizal ] </li></ul>(Wikipedia, 2008)
  5. 5. cortex FUNGAL SHEATH FUNGAL SHEATH: between cortical cells epidermis section of a PLANT ROOT [ ecto mycorrhizae] (Campbell & Reece, 2005)
  6. 6. epidermis cortex intra cellular hyphae extra cellular hyphae root hair section of a PLANT ROOT [ endo mycorrhizae] arbuscules (Campbell & Reece, 2005)
  7. 7. EPIPHYTIC plant/s <ul><li>DO NOT root in the soil. </li></ul><ul><li>attach to living plants, ie: tree </li></ul><ul><li>mosses </li></ul><ul><li>lichens </li></ul><ul><li>fungi </li></ul><ul><li>plants </li></ul><ul><li>trees </li></ul><ul><li>ferns </li></ul>
  8. 8. DERIVE the physical support from their host & , NUTRIENTS derived from PHOTOSYNTHESIS overgrowth of an EPIPHYTIC PLANT can cause the host to be strangled &THEN replaces the HOST : (number of years) EXAMPLE: climbing plants OR crawlers (Wikipedia, 2008)
  9. 9. RHIZOBIUM <ul><li>a soil microbe that enters the root of plant/s </li></ul><ul><li>- both aerobic & anaerobic , produces enzymes </li></ul><ul><li>- stimulates abnormal growth of the root cells: </li></ul><ul><li>these form into , NODULES on the root </li></ul>METABOLISM of the microbe supplies nitrogen to the plant in a form the plant can then METABOLISE as a nutrient – this phenomenon is called: “ NITROGEN FIXING ROOT NODULE/S ” (Wikipedia, 2008)
  10. 12. Bibliography Wikipedia. (2008). Rhizobia – wikipedia, the free encyclopedia . Retrieved September 2, 2008, from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhizobia Campbell, N., & Reece, J. (2005). Biology (7 th ed.). San Fransisco: Benjamin Cummings Wikipedia. (2008). Mycorrhiza – wikipedia, the free encyclopedia . Retrieved September 2, 2008, from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ Mycorrhiza - 45k - Wikipedia. (2008). Epiphyte – wikipedia, the free encyclopedia . Retrieved September 2, 2008, from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Epiphyte – 30k -

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