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INFLUENCING POLICY
Question:
Your handbooks
Question:
What is policy impact?
Question:
What is policy impact?
?
Who
benefits
The good that
researchers do
in the world
Reed (The Research Impact Handbook)
Question:
What is impact?
“Demonstrable and/or perceptible benefits to individuals,
groups, organisations and society (including human and non-
human entities in the present and future) that are causally
linked (necessarily or sufficiently) to research.”
Reed et al. (2021) Research Policy
Question:
There is no such thing as
(purely) evidence-based policy
Question:
Responsible policy impact
Question:
Responsible policy impact
Imposter syndrome
only go as far as you feel comfortable
Question:
A personal journey
Timing Approach Role
Are you ready to
engage with
policy yet?
Do you want to
reactively inform
or proactively
influence?
Do you want to be
a critical friend,
collaborator, broker
or advocate/
campaigner?
Clearly-defined policy
problems and/or
solutions
Strong evidence
Limited, weak or
mixed evidence
Poorly-defined policy
problems and/or
solutions
Systematic impact strategy
• Use evidence to evaluate existing
policies to make the case for
change and assess alternative
solutions
• Use a Logic model of Theory of
Change to plan policy change
Relational impact strategy
• Use evidence to better understand
the problem, drawing on different
perspectives from policy networks
• Co-produce new policy options with
policy networks and those affected
Systematic research strategy
• Synthesise existing evidence to
identify what is known and gaps
• Gap fill with new research, co-
produced with those who affected
where possible
Relational research strategy
• Explore the problem from the
perspective of different groups
• Co-produce potential solutions to
research with people who see the
problem from different perspectives
Are you ready to engage with policy yet?
Who has a stake in my research?
1. Evidence synthesis
Tools for building the evidence base
 Scoping reviews
 Systematic reviews
 Meta-analysis
 Realist reviews
 Qualitative
evidence synthesis
 Umbrella reviews
 Rapid reviews
2. Adapt your current
research
3. Apply for funding to
analyse secondary
data or collect new
primary data…
Proactive engagement
via knowledge exchange
Questioning,
inclusive
engagement
Pragmatic,
exclusive
engagement
Reactive engagement
via knowledge transfer
Facilitating influencer
Creating alliances with non-academic
organisations, coproducing policy
options with those affected by the
problem, doing consultancy projects for
NGOs seeking to influence policy
Facilitating informer
For example, writing a consultation
response that gives voice to those
directly affected alongside other
research evidence
Expert influencer
For example, using policy briefs to run
policy webinars, being available to
answer questions from policy
colleagues, doing policy consultancy
projects
Expert informer
For example, speaking at a
parliamentary inquiry or committee,
writing opinion pieces and
disseminating policy briefs
Do you want to inform or influence?
Question:
Discussion
Timing Approach Role
Are you ready to
engage with
policy yet?
Do you want to
reactively inform
or proactively
influence?
Do you want to be
a critical friend,
collaborator, broker
or advocate/
campaigner?
Question:
Discussion
Timing Approach Role
Are you ready to
engage with
policy yet?
Do you want to
reactively inform
or proactively
influence?
Do you want to be
a critical friend,
collaborator, broker
or advocate/
campaigner?
All knowledge must be
interpreted subjectively
Policy
responsive
research with
close working
relationships
Policy-relevant
research with
distance from
policy colleagues
All knowledge is objective
Expert broker
Clearly defining the policy problem and providing
as many feasible solutions as possible,
evaluating options based on evidence
Expert collaborator
Co-produce policy responsive mono- or multi-
disciplinary research with policy colleagues
Campaigner
Single-issue focus mobilising the public to
influence policy indirectly, usually in
adversarial mode
Critical friend
Asking provocative questions and
providing scrutiny of policy
Advocate
Single-issue focus working directly with
policy colleagues either closely or in
adversarial mode
Facilitating broker
Questioning how the policy problem is framed and
providing as many feasible policy options as
possible including evidence and perspectives from
affected groups for policy colleagues to evaluate
Facilitating collaborator
Co-produce policy responsive, transdisciplinary
research with policy colleagues and groups
affected by the policies
What role will you play?
Who has a stake in my research?
Informers: sign up to consultation email lists
Influencers: reach out to contacts based on
their interests and co-produce an impact plan
Critical friends and campaigners: identify
organisations you can work with to hold policy
to account
Brokers: Identify groups with different
perspectives you need to represent
Collaborators: Co-produce your impact plan
Adapting to your preferences
Practical
tools
The heart of the impact agenda in…
1 metaphor
1 word
Empathy
Who has a stake in my research?
Analysing who’s relevant
Who has a stake in my research?
Who’s relevant? 3i’s
1. Who is interested (or not)?
2. Who has influence (to facilitate or block
impact) or not?
3. Who is impacted (positively or negatively)?
Why?
Who has a stake in my research?
Options:
1. Websites and
organograms
2. LinkedIn (or a
colleague’s if
better
connected)
3. Your networks
4. Paid
directories and
consultants
Identifying relevant contacts
I only have 4 connections in
Department of Business, Energy and
Industrial Strategy working on climate
change, but if I include 2nd and 3rd
degree connections, I can identify
713 people in the department with
interests in climate change
K*** Fear*****h
Who has a stake in my research?
Story: how I used
a 3i analysis to
reframe our
research to
successive
ministers to
achieve policy
impact
Identifying relevant contacts
How do you feel?
Question:
Identifying your red lines
Limited Influence and Impact More
Lower risk Higher risk
now
Vote
Writing a
policy brief
infographic or
presentation
that has real impact
Who has a stake in my research?
 Summary or synthesis of research evidence
 Targets an issue, evidence gap or policy
need
 Provides policy options, advice or actions
 You can write and design you own policy
brief or be part of a series
What is a policy brief?
Who has a stake in my research?
 When you’ve submitted evidence to a
consultation or inquiry that you also want to
get to specific people or teams
 As a visual aid for a talk or meeting to leave
with participants for follow-up
 When your research is only part of the
picture – integrate with other projects or
evidence synthesis
When is a policy brief useful?
Who has a stake in my research?
 Use more infographics and less text the
higher up the policy chain you are targeting
 Can be integrated with policy briefs or
repurposed for social media and
presentations
 You can make them yourself with no design
skills or money…
Infographic
Infographics are a great way of communicating
your research to a wider audience
Who has a stake in my research?
Start by cutting your article down to size.
Extract your key messages
Who has a stake in my research?
 Cut the academic jargon and rework your
messages to use as few words as
possible, making sure that they are
instantly understandable.
 The simpler your language, the more
effective your infographic is likely to be.
Simplify your language
Who has a stake in my research?
 Draw all the images that come into your
mind as you think about each point,
Visualize your key messages
Who has a stake in my research?
Come up with a layout
Who has a stake in my research?
Convert to graphics
Who has a stake in my research?
 Integrate inforgraphics into policy briefs
 Expand messages from presentations in
accompanying policy briefs
 Revise your policy brief based on the
questions you get when you present
Integrating products
Who has a stake in my research?
 Choose a policy product (link to folder in chat
now)
 Discuss what you like or dislike
 Share your screen to illustrate your points or
tell others the file name so they can open the
document you’re viewing
What makes a good policy product?
out
Break
A good policy brief:
 Summarises or synthesizes evidence
 Communicates complexity and uncertainty responsibly
 Clearly targets a policy need, challenge or policy-
relevant evidence gap
 Identifies technically and politically feasible actions or
questions existing options to open up new opportunity
spaces
 Is developed with feedback from policy networks
Question:
Content tips
 Use a limited colour palette
 Keep text to a minimum, break up blocks of text with
sub-headings, images, diagrams and white space or
blocks of colour
 Catch the eye with an image or infographic on the
front page
 Add University/funder logos
Question:
Design tips
 Front page:
 Concise, prominent and policy-relevant title
 Key messages or policy options
 Inside:
 Policy challenge
 Research
 Explain and appraise policy options
 Back page:
 Contact details
 References, footnotes or further reading on back page
 Plain English and policy jargon only
 Length depends on audience
Question:
Structure tips
Who has a stake in my research?
Informers: send to policy teams
Influencers: use in meetings and webinars
Critical friends and campaigners: send to
media
Brokers: research and cover all the options
Collaborators: co-produce your policy products
Adapting to your preferences
Who has a stake in my research?
Getting your focus right:
 Use your 3i analysis to identify warm
contacts from relevant policy networks (e.g.
engaged researchers, third sector,
consultants, agency staff, civil servants,
MPs)
 Tailored email based on intersection between
your interests and theirs
 Meet to discuss evidence gaps, policy needs
and other questions
Co-producing a policy brief
Who has a stake in my research?
Getting your content right:
 Get their help to identify keywords that will
resonate with your audience
Co-producing a policy brief
 Get their feedback
on draft text and
design
 Stress-test drafts
 Consider different
versions
Who has a stake in my research?
Co-producing a policy brief
Who has a stake in my research?
Case study
How do you feel?
Question:
Identifying your red lines
Limited Influence and Impact More
Lower risk Higher risk
now
Vote
Using your policy
product in
meetings and
policy
seminars
Who has a stake in my research?
 Revisit your stakeholder analysis
 Focus on high interest/influence groups that will
directly benefit from your research
 Fine-grain your analysis if necessary to identify
specific teams and individuals via online research
and help from colleagues
 Create invitations based on their interests
(tailored for one-to-one meetings or list most
important benefits for seminars)
Targeting key people and teams
Who has a stake in my research?
Options to consider:
 Single issue/presenter versus curating a
programme
 Joining a seminar series versus creating a
stand-alone event
 In-house or a nearby venue with a nice lunch
 Presentation/questions or participatory
format
 Feedback questionnaire or post-card to your
future self
Policy seminars
Who has a stake in my research?
Options to consider:
 Cold call or be introduced via a trusted
intermediary
 Send key messages and policy brief via
intermediary, visit with them or go yourself
 Come in listening mode or with key
messages
 Their office or a coffee shop
One-to-one meetings
Who has a stake in my research?
 What is the difference between influence and
manipulation?
 How might researchers inadvertently cross
their own red lines?
Discussion exercise
Pitching
policy options in
meetings and seminars
1. Purpose
2. Communicate
tangible
benefits
3. Explain why
these benefits
are important
1. Have purpose
! ! !
4. Give people a reason to trust you
5. What’s coming next?
1. Have purpose
 Know your audience
 If you don’t, start off
getting to know them
 What concerns and
motivates them most?
 The power of stories
 Stories with impact are
personal, unexpected,
visual, visceral
2. Connect
 Ask “you-focused” questions, for example:
 What would you do if…
2. Connect
 Use your body language:
 Open & approachable; positive & energised
 Your audience will mirror you emotionally
2. Connect
AUTHORITATIVE INTIMIDATING
VS
3. Be authoritative and passionate
 Posture: be aware of your feet
 Start/end at “home” position and use
different stage positions for different
3. Be authoritative and passionate
 Use emphasis to make every word and
sentence count:
3. Be authoritative and passionate
 Slow down and spell out key
points
 Use volume
 Vary intonation  Pause/silenc
e
 Identify one, memorable key
message
4. Keep it simple
4. Keep it simple
 People will
forget the
detail, so use
the detail to
build and
convey your
key message
 Repeat it in
different
ways, coming
at it from
different
angles to
communicate
your
secondary
messages
 Practice and practice
again
 Record yourself, get
feedback, identify
bad habits and
practice breaking
them
 Speaking too fast,
pacing, verbal fillers
5. Polish
 No slides are better than bad slides:
use visuals to add impact, not as your
notes
5. Polish
Ella aged 2
wearing mum’s shoes
Ella aged 22
Put yourself in their shoes: have purpose, connect, be
authoritative & passionate, keep it simple, and polish
your shoes regularly
Question:
Discussion
 Something important you learned or liked
 Something you disagreed with
 Share a story or a tip
 Ask a question
Comment
in chat
Open
mic
How do you feel?
Question:
Identifying your red lines
Limited Influence and Impact More
Lower risk Higher risk
now
Vote
The bottom-up and top-
down pincer movement
Who has a stake in my research?
You don’t have to be the world expert to become
the “go to” person:
 Identify junior civil servants who work with
evidence in your field
 Offer targeted help based on their
interests/remit, asking what else you can do
 Work in the public interest, not just to get your
research used
 Deliver useful, understandable and on time, via
your network if outside your expertise
 Wait for them to connect you to their teams
Bottom-up: the trusted advisor
Who has a stake in my research?
 Identify influential stakeholder organisations and
decide if you can work with them (considering
risks to your values and reputation)
 Offer help to junior staff who work with evidence,
build trust and get to know their teams
 Provide evidence for them to use in high-level
meetings, if possible briefing and de-briefing
before/after
 The risk: they cherry-pick or distort the evidence
to lobby using your name and credibility
Top-down: intermediaries
Who has a stake in my research?
 When it all comes together…
Top-down and bottom up
Open
mic
How do you feel?
Question:
Identifying your red lines
Limited Influence and Impact More
Lower risk Higher risk
now
Vote
In chat
Comment
Open
mic
For example:
 Things you disagree with or do differently
 Questions about specific contexts or situations
 Something I’m taking away from this (to think
about or do)
Questions
Next steps
Write in chat:
 What will I do, based on what I learned today?
Provide your email address and I’ll contact you a
month from now to remind you what you wrote
and see if I can help.
Or send your action to a colleague and arrange
a meeting over drinks to swap notes in a month.
Evaluating Impact
Actions
In chat
Comment
Get a reply from Mark to any query within 1 week:
send via Madie (pa@fasttrackimpact.com)
www.fasttrackimpact.com
@fasttrackimpact
Evaluating Impact
Feedback
www.fasttrackimpact.com/feedback-form
Evaluating Impact
Newsletter
Read and discuss
Free follow-up training
www.fasttrackimpact.com/for-researchers
Read and discuss
Free follow-up training
www.fasttrackimpact.com/impactculture
For trainings over two days,
place this slide before the policy
brief session
Who has a stake in my research?
 If you have time: read the Oliver and Cairney
paper (or you can just work from the abstract
tomorrow)
 Reflect on additional lessons you would add,
based on what you learned today
 Come up with actions (policy options) that
could be actioned by a new policy institute at
your University to facilitate policy impact
Preparation for tomorrow
For trainings over two days, start
day 2 with this slide
Who has a stake in my research?
 Extract the key messages from the
paper/abstract and yesterday’s session
 Use the 3i’s tool to identify who would be most
relevant to engage with, if you wanted to
influence the strategic plan for a new University
policy institute
 Come up with actionable options for strategic
plan, catering to the needs of the relevant
people/groups you identified e.g. activities,
structures, initiatives, that would enable the new
institute to facilitate policy impact. For example:
reflect (key message) > researchers (relevant
group) > learning from failure
Exercise

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Influencing policy (training slides from Fast Track Impact)

  • 4.
  • 5. Question: What is policy impact? ? Who benefits
  • 6. The good that researchers do in the world Reed (The Research Impact Handbook) Question: What is impact? “Demonstrable and/or perceptible benefits to individuals, groups, organisations and society (including human and non- human entities in the present and future) that are causally linked (necessarily or sufficiently) to research.” Reed et al. (2021) Research Policy
  • 7.
  • 8. Question: There is no such thing as (purely) evidence-based policy
  • 10. Question: Responsible policy impact Imposter syndrome only go as far as you feel comfortable
  • 11. Question: A personal journey Timing Approach Role Are you ready to engage with policy yet? Do you want to reactively inform or proactively influence? Do you want to be a critical friend, collaborator, broker or advocate/ campaigner?
  • 12. Clearly-defined policy problems and/or solutions Strong evidence Limited, weak or mixed evidence Poorly-defined policy problems and/or solutions Systematic impact strategy • Use evidence to evaluate existing policies to make the case for change and assess alternative solutions • Use a Logic model of Theory of Change to plan policy change Relational impact strategy • Use evidence to better understand the problem, drawing on different perspectives from policy networks • Co-produce new policy options with policy networks and those affected Systematic research strategy • Synthesise existing evidence to identify what is known and gaps • Gap fill with new research, co- produced with those who affected where possible Relational research strategy • Explore the problem from the perspective of different groups • Co-produce potential solutions to research with people who see the problem from different perspectives Are you ready to engage with policy yet?
  • 13. Who has a stake in my research? 1. Evidence synthesis Tools for building the evidence base  Scoping reviews  Systematic reviews  Meta-analysis  Realist reviews  Qualitative evidence synthesis  Umbrella reviews  Rapid reviews 2. Adapt your current research 3. Apply for funding to analyse secondary data or collect new primary data…
  • 14.
  • 15. Proactive engagement via knowledge exchange Questioning, inclusive engagement Pragmatic, exclusive engagement Reactive engagement via knowledge transfer Facilitating influencer Creating alliances with non-academic organisations, coproducing policy options with those affected by the problem, doing consultancy projects for NGOs seeking to influence policy Facilitating informer For example, writing a consultation response that gives voice to those directly affected alongside other research evidence Expert influencer For example, using policy briefs to run policy webinars, being available to answer questions from policy colleagues, doing policy consultancy projects Expert informer For example, speaking at a parliamentary inquiry or committee, writing opinion pieces and disseminating policy briefs Do you want to inform or influence?
  • 16. Question: Discussion Timing Approach Role Are you ready to engage with policy yet? Do you want to reactively inform or proactively influence? Do you want to be a critical friend, collaborator, broker or advocate/ campaigner?
  • 17. Question: Discussion Timing Approach Role Are you ready to engage with policy yet? Do you want to reactively inform or proactively influence? Do you want to be a critical friend, collaborator, broker or advocate/ campaigner?
  • 18. All knowledge must be interpreted subjectively Policy responsive research with close working relationships Policy-relevant research with distance from policy colleagues All knowledge is objective Expert broker Clearly defining the policy problem and providing as many feasible solutions as possible, evaluating options based on evidence Expert collaborator Co-produce policy responsive mono- or multi- disciplinary research with policy colleagues Campaigner Single-issue focus mobilising the public to influence policy indirectly, usually in adversarial mode Critical friend Asking provocative questions and providing scrutiny of policy Advocate Single-issue focus working directly with policy colleagues either closely or in adversarial mode Facilitating broker Questioning how the policy problem is framed and providing as many feasible policy options as possible including evidence and perspectives from affected groups for policy colleagues to evaluate Facilitating collaborator Co-produce policy responsive, transdisciplinary research with policy colleagues and groups affected by the policies What role will you play?
  • 19. Who has a stake in my research? Informers: sign up to consultation email lists Influencers: reach out to contacts based on their interests and co-produce an impact plan Critical friends and campaigners: identify organisations you can work with to hold policy to account Brokers: Identify groups with different perspectives you need to represent Collaborators: Co-produce your impact plan Adapting to your preferences
  • 21. The heart of the impact agenda in… 1 metaphor 1 word
  • 22.
  • 24. Who has a stake in my research? Analysing who’s relevant
  • 25. Who has a stake in my research? Who’s relevant? 3i’s 1. Who is interested (or not)? 2. Who has influence (to facilitate or block impact) or not? 3. Who is impacted (positively or negatively)? Why?
  • 26.
  • 27.
  • 28. Who has a stake in my research? Options: 1. Websites and organograms 2. LinkedIn (or a colleague’s if better connected) 3. Your networks 4. Paid directories and consultants Identifying relevant contacts I only have 4 connections in Department of Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy working on climate change, but if I include 2nd and 3rd degree connections, I can identify 713 people in the department with interests in climate change K*** Fear*****h
  • 29. Who has a stake in my research? Story: how I used a 3i analysis to reframe our research to successive ministers to achieve policy impact Identifying relevant contacts
  • 30.
  • 31.
  • 32. How do you feel? Question: Identifying your red lines Limited Influence and Impact More Lower risk Higher risk now Vote
  • 33. Writing a policy brief infographic or presentation that has real impact
  • 34. Who has a stake in my research?  Summary or synthesis of research evidence  Targets an issue, evidence gap or policy need  Provides policy options, advice or actions  You can write and design you own policy brief or be part of a series What is a policy brief?
  • 35. Who has a stake in my research?  When you’ve submitted evidence to a consultation or inquiry that you also want to get to specific people or teams  As a visual aid for a talk or meeting to leave with participants for follow-up  When your research is only part of the picture – integrate with other projects or evidence synthesis When is a policy brief useful?
  • 36. Who has a stake in my research?  Use more infographics and less text the higher up the policy chain you are targeting  Can be integrated with policy briefs or repurposed for social media and presentations  You can make them yourself with no design skills or money… Infographic
  • 37. Infographics are a great way of communicating your research to a wider audience
  • 38. Who has a stake in my research? Start by cutting your article down to size. Extract your key messages
  • 39. Who has a stake in my research?  Cut the academic jargon and rework your messages to use as few words as possible, making sure that they are instantly understandable.  The simpler your language, the more effective your infographic is likely to be. Simplify your language
  • 40. Who has a stake in my research?  Draw all the images that come into your mind as you think about each point, Visualize your key messages
  • 41. Who has a stake in my research? Come up with a layout
  • 42. Who has a stake in my research? Convert to graphics
  • 43. Who has a stake in my research?  Integrate inforgraphics into policy briefs  Expand messages from presentations in accompanying policy briefs  Revise your policy brief based on the questions you get when you present Integrating products
  • 44. Who has a stake in my research?  Choose a policy product (link to folder in chat now)  Discuss what you like or dislike  Share your screen to illustrate your points or tell others the file name so they can open the document you’re viewing What makes a good policy product? out Break
  • 45. A good policy brief:  Summarises or synthesizes evidence  Communicates complexity and uncertainty responsibly  Clearly targets a policy need, challenge or policy- relevant evidence gap  Identifies technically and politically feasible actions or questions existing options to open up new opportunity spaces  Is developed with feedback from policy networks Question: Content tips
  • 46.  Use a limited colour palette  Keep text to a minimum, break up blocks of text with sub-headings, images, diagrams and white space or blocks of colour  Catch the eye with an image or infographic on the front page  Add University/funder logos Question: Design tips
  • 47.  Front page:  Concise, prominent and policy-relevant title  Key messages or policy options  Inside:  Policy challenge  Research  Explain and appraise policy options  Back page:  Contact details  References, footnotes or further reading on back page  Plain English and policy jargon only  Length depends on audience Question: Structure tips
  • 48. Who has a stake in my research? Informers: send to policy teams Influencers: use in meetings and webinars Critical friends and campaigners: send to media Brokers: research and cover all the options Collaborators: co-produce your policy products Adapting to your preferences
  • 49. Who has a stake in my research? Getting your focus right:  Use your 3i analysis to identify warm contacts from relevant policy networks (e.g. engaged researchers, third sector, consultants, agency staff, civil servants, MPs)  Tailored email based on intersection between your interests and theirs  Meet to discuss evidence gaps, policy needs and other questions Co-producing a policy brief
  • 50. Who has a stake in my research? Getting your content right:  Get their help to identify keywords that will resonate with your audience Co-producing a policy brief  Get their feedback on draft text and design  Stress-test drafts  Consider different versions
  • 51. Who has a stake in my research? Co-producing a policy brief
  • 52. Who has a stake in my research? Case study
  • 53. How do you feel? Question: Identifying your red lines Limited Influence and Impact More Lower risk Higher risk now Vote
  • 54. Using your policy product in meetings and policy seminars
  • 55. Who has a stake in my research?  Revisit your stakeholder analysis  Focus on high interest/influence groups that will directly benefit from your research  Fine-grain your analysis if necessary to identify specific teams and individuals via online research and help from colleagues  Create invitations based on their interests (tailored for one-to-one meetings or list most important benefits for seminars) Targeting key people and teams
  • 56. Who has a stake in my research? Options to consider:  Single issue/presenter versus curating a programme  Joining a seminar series versus creating a stand-alone event  In-house or a nearby venue with a nice lunch  Presentation/questions or participatory format  Feedback questionnaire or post-card to your future self Policy seminars
  • 57. Who has a stake in my research? Options to consider:  Cold call or be introduced via a trusted intermediary  Send key messages and policy brief via intermediary, visit with them or go yourself  Come in listening mode or with key messages  Their office or a coffee shop One-to-one meetings
  • 58. Who has a stake in my research?  What is the difference between influence and manipulation?  How might researchers inadvertently cross their own red lines? Discussion exercise
  • 60. 1. Purpose 2. Communicate tangible benefits 3. Explain why these benefits are important 1. Have purpose ! ! !
  • 61. 4. Give people a reason to trust you 5. What’s coming next? 1. Have purpose
  • 62.  Know your audience  If you don’t, start off getting to know them  What concerns and motivates them most?  The power of stories  Stories with impact are personal, unexpected, visual, visceral 2. Connect
  • 63.  Ask “you-focused” questions, for example:  What would you do if… 2. Connect
  • 64.  Use your body language:  Open & approachable; positive & energised  Your audience will mirror you emotionally 2. Connect
  • 65. AUTHORITATIVE INTIMIDATING VS 3. Be authoritative and passionate
  • 66.  Posture: be aware of your feet  Start/end at “home” position and use different stage positions for different 3. Be authoritative and passionate
  • 67.  Use emphasis to make every word and sentence count: 3. Be authoritative and passionate  Slow down and spell out key points  Use volume  Vary intonation  Pause/silenc e
  • 68.  Identify one, memorable key message 4. Keep it simple
  • 69. 4. Keep it simple  People will forget the detail, so use the detail to build and convey your key message  Repeat it in different ways, coming at it from different angles to communicate your secondary messages
  • 70.  Practice and practice again  Record yourself, get feedback, identify bad habits and practice breaking them  Speaking too fast, pacing, verbal fillers 5. Polish
  • 71.  No slides are better than bad slides: use visuals to add impact, not as your notes 5. Polish
  • 72. Ella aged 2 wearing mum’s shoes Ella aged 22 Put yourself in their shoes: have purpose, connect, be authoritative & passionate, keep it simple, and polish your shoes regularly
  • 73. Question: Discussion  Something important you learned or liked  Something you disagreed with  Share a story or a tip  Ask a question Comment in chat Open mic
  • 74. How do you feel? Question: Identifying your red lines Limited Influence and Impact More Lower risk Higher risk now Vote
  • 75. The bottom-up and top- down pincer movement
  • 76. Who has a stake in my research? You don’t have to be the world expert to become the “go to” person:  Identify junior civil servants who work with evidence in your field  Offer targeted help based on their interests/remit, asking what else you can do  Work in the public interest, not just to get your research used  Deliver useful, understandable and on time, via your network if outside your expertise  Wait for them to connect you to their teams Bottom-up: the trusted advisor
  • 77. Who has a stake in my research?  Identify influential stakeholder organisations and decide if you can work with them (considering risks to your values and reputation)  Offer help to junior staff who work with evidence, build trust and get to know their teams  Provide evidence for them to use in high-level meetings, if possible briefing and de-briefing before/after  The risk: they cherry-pick or distort the evidence to lobby using your name and credibility Top-down: intermediaries
  • 78. Who has a stake in my research?  When it all comes together… Top-down and bottom up Open mic
  • 79. How do you feel? Question: Identifying your red lines Limited Influence and Impact More Lower risk Higher risk now Vote
  • 80. In chat Comment Open mic For example:  Things you disagree with or do differently  Questions about specific contexts or situations  Something I’m taking away from this (to think about or do) Questions
  • 82. Write in chat:  What will I do, based on what I learned today? Provide your email address and I’ll contact you a month from now to remind you what you wrote and see if I can help. Or send your action to a colleague and arrange a meeting over drinks to swap notes in a month. Evaluating Impact Actions In chat Comment
  • 83. Get a reply from Mark to any query within 1 week: send via Madie (pa@fasttrackimpact.com) www.fasttrackimpact.com @fasttrackimpact
  • 86. Read and discuss Free follow-up training www.fasttrackimpact.com/for-researchers
  • 87. Read and discuss Free follow-up training www.fasttrackimpact.com/impactculture
  • 88. For trainings over two days, place this slide before the policy brief session
  • 89. Who has a stake in my research?  If you have time: read the Oliver and Cairney paper (or you can just work from the abstract tomorrow)  Reflect on additional lessons you would add, based on what you learned today  Come up with actions (policy options) that could be actioned by a new policy institute at your University to facilitate policy impact Preparation for tomorrow
  • 90. For trainings over two days, start day 2 with this slide
  • 91. Who has a stake in my research?  Extract the key messages from the paper/abstract and yesterday’s session  Use the 3i’s tool to identify who would be most relevant to engage with, if you wanted to influence the strategic plan for a new University policy institute  Come up with actionable options for strategic plan, catering to the needs of the relevant people/groups you identified e.g. activities, structures, initiatives, that would enable the new institute to facilitate policy impact. For example: reflect (key message) > researchers (relevant group) > learning from failure Exercise