Learning event powerpoint template gender indicators

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Learning event powerpoint template gender indicators

  1. 1. How do we measure women’s empowerment? MECIS ECONOMIC JUSTICE COMMUNITY 0F PRACTICE LEARNING WORKSHOP REGIONAL QUALITY TEAM MARCH 17-20, 2014
  2. 2. Page 2 Key Dimensions of Women’s Empowerment Ability to make Decisions & Influence Self- perception and Personal Freedom Access to & Control over Resources Support from Social Networks What affects a women’s ability to control her own circumstances and fulfil her own interests and priorities?
  3. 3. Page 3 Ability to Make Decisions and Influence • Involvement in HH: • a) investment decisions; •b) livelihood mgt. decisions; •c) income spending decisions; and •d) general decisions • Degree of influence in community decision-making • Ability and access for women to reach leadership positions (public office, private enterprises)
  4. 4. Page 4 Examples of Indicators: Ability to Make Decisions and Influence • % of women involved in household/enterprise/community decision making. • Perception that the site of production is seen as a powerful or important physical space in the community. • A bank manager returned to the community to offer a producer group loans which had previously been rejected. • Women have the opportunity to hold leadership positions in POs (including participation in decision making in POs and in constitutional / procedural provisions for the POs/ Cooperatives)
  5. 5. Page 5 Perception and Personal Freedom • Opinions on (a) women’s property rights, (b) women’s political rights, (c) educational equality. • Opinions on women’s economic and political roles • Opinions on early marriage • Self-confidence • Psychosocial well- being • Literacy • Autonomy in work • Time to pursue personal goals • Support from family in pursuing personal goals • Attitude to violence against women • Experience of violence
  6. 6. Page 6 Examples of Indicators: Perception and Personal Freedom • Vulnerable women in the community participate and try to influence village-level planning meetings. • Women from producer groups try to gain positions in legislative office. • Women are willing to speak up in community meetings. • Women are well-groomed and proudly wearing the uniform of their producer group (for the respect they feel it garners) • Ability to interact with people in a range of outside-the-home environments (eg: offices) • How much and how confidently participating women speak to staff during project visits (rather than being spoken to). • Women's visibility outside the home during project visits (when previously they would hide.)
  7. 7. Page 7 Access to and Control Over Resources • Ownership of land and property • Ownership of other productive assets • Independent income • Extent of role in managing/keeping families cash • Savings • Access to credit
  8. 8. Page 8 Examples of Indicators: Access to and Control Over Resources • % of women's control over income and access to strategic / assets. • % of women consuming the profit by their own decisions. • % of women receiving services from public and private service providers. • At least 40% of targeted women entrepreneurs own enterprises making a profit of more than 25% by the end of the project. • Participants report increase in assets during project period.
  9. 9. Page 9 Support from Social Networks •Degree of social connectivity •Participation in community groups •Level of support provided by groups to pursue own initiatives • Social capital •Availability of and access to services to pursue objectives (e.g. business services with all-male staff can limit access for women in certain contexts)
  10. 10. Page 10 Examples of Indicators: Support from Social Networks • The District Steering Committee will address issues and influence policies in favour of poor women coir producers. • Women producers will gain the knowledge and social skills required to develop successful businesses and link directly to markets. • % of women involved in CBO, local government, market committee, enterprise management, producer group committee. • As women make economic gains, they will experience increased status and respect in the home and community. • Monitoring whether or not Violence Against Women and Girls protection mechanisms are in place (women’s desks, referral units, gender focal points).
  11. 11. Page 11 Ability to make decision and influence Self-perception and personal freedom Access to and control over resources Support from social networks Innovation services USE TAJIKISTAN EXAMPLE New business models USE AZERbaijan and West bank example Influencing and investment Use Georgia and Gaza example from Today!

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