Metric System
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Metric System

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  • 1. Introduction to Matter and the Metric System 7 th Grade Physical Science Mr. Riordan
  • 2. What is Matter?
    • Matter is all things that we can see, touch, and smell in our daily lives.
  • 3.
    • Matter is what the universe is made of
  • 4.
    • We are made of matter
  • 5.
    • Matter has properties.
    • A property is a characteristic of something that helps identify it, and which makes it unique.
    • Properties describe an object .
  • 6. Properties of Matter
    • There are some properties of matter.
    • These properties are mass, weight, volume, and density .
    • Our working definition of matter is any substance that has mass and volume
  • 7. MASS
    • Mass is the amount of matter in an object .
    • Mass is constant
  • 8.
    • It cannot be changed unless you add or remove matter from an object.
  • 9.
    • The metric units that are used to express mass are the gram (g), milligram (mg) , and the kilogram (kg).
  • 10.
    • The amount of space an object takes up or occupies is called its volume.
  • 11.
    • The metric units that are used to express volume are the liter (L), milliliter (mL) , and the cubic centimeter (cm 3 ).
    • Liters and milliliters are used to measure the volume of liquids .
    • Cubic centimeters are used to measure the volume of solids .
  • 12. History of the Metric System
    • Developed in Lyon, France, ~1670
    • Created to make consistent units for measurement
    • Based on “powers of 10” …what does this mean?
  • 13. The Basic Metric Units
    • Meter : base unit for length
    • Liter : base unit for volume
    • Gram : base unit for mass
  • 14. Powers of 10
    • Prefixes in front of the base unit tell if the measurement is greater or less than the base unit.
    • Each prefix is a factor of ten .
    • This makes it easy to convert between units.
  • 15. How big is a ….
      • Kilometer? 1000x larger then a meter
      • Meter? Height of a standard countertop
      • Centimeter? 100x smaller then a meter, the width of a dime
      • Millimeter? 1000x smaller then a meter, the thickness of a dime
  • 16. Metric Prefixes Kilo 1000x Larger Smaller Base Units Kilo 1000 X larger Hecto 100 X larger Deka 10 X larger (no prefix) Meter Liter Gram Deci One Tenth 1/10 Centi One Hundreth 1/100 Milli One Thousanth 1/1000
  • 17. Using a Ruler
    • What is the length of the blue arrow?
  • 18. Using a Ruler
    • ALWAYS measure with the starting point at the “0” mark!
  • 19. Kilometer - km
    • 1000 times larger than a meter.
    • 12 blocks less than a mile.
    • Main span of GW bridge
  • 20. Hectameter - hm
    • 100x larger than a meter.
    • Height of Statue of Liberty from base to torch
  • 21. Decameter - dam
    • 10 x larger than a meter
    • Length of a school bus
  • 22. Meter - m
    • Length of a meter stick.
    • Height of a counter top
  • 23. Decimeter - dm
    • 10x smaller than a meter.
    • Height of a can of soda.
  • 24. Centimeter - cm
    • 100x smaller than a meter
    • ½ width of a dime
  • 25. Millimeter - mm
    • 1000x smaller than a meter
    • The thickness of a dime
  • 26. Micrometer - um
    • 1,000,000x smaller than a meter.
    • diameter of a bacteria cell
  • 27. Nanometer - nm
    • 1,000,000,000x smaller than a meter.
    • Thickness of a DNA molecule.
  • 28. Kilogram - kg
    • 1000x heavier than a gram
    • Mass of a liter of orange juice.
  • 29. Hectogram - hg
    • 100x heavier than a gram.
    • Mass of a stick of butter.
  • 30. Decagram - dkg
    • 10 x heavier than a gram
    • Mass of 2 nickels
  • 31. Gram - g
    • Mass of a paper clip
  • 32. Decigram - dg
    • 10 x lighter than a gram.
    • Mass of 10 grains of salt
  • 33. Centigram - cg
    • 100x lighter than a gram.
    • Mass of a single grain of salt.
  • 34. Milligram - mg
    • 1,000x lighter than a gram.
    • Mass of a mosquito
  • 35. Microgram - ug
    • 1,000,000x lighter than a gram
    • Mass of a flour particle
  • 36. Nanogram - ng
    • 1,000,000,000x lighter than a gram
    • Mass of a human cell.
  • 37. Kiloliter - kL
    • 1000x larger than a liter
    • Volume of a fridge
    • 1,000,000 cm 3
  • 38. Hectoliter - hL
    • 100x larger than a liter.
    • 100,000 cm 3
    • Volume of two kitchen trashcans
  • 39. Decaliter - dkL
    • 10 x larger than a liter.
    • 10,000 cm 3
    • Volume of 3 gallons of milk
  • 40. Liter - L
    • 100 cm 3
    • Volume of 3 cans of soda
  • 41. Deciliter - dL
    • 10x smaller than a liter.
    • 100 cm 3
    • Volume of a dixie cup
  • 42. Centiliter - cL
    • 100x smaller than a liter
    • 10 cm 3
    • 2 tablespoons of liquid
  • 43. Milliliter - mL
    • 1000x smaller than a liter
    • 1 cm 3
    • Volume of a cube of sugar
  • 44. Microliter - uL
    • 1,000,000x smaller than a liter
    • 0.001 cm 3
    • Crystal of table salt
  • 45. nanoLiter - nL
    • 1,000,000,000x smaller than a liter.
    • 0.000001 cm 3