Antennas wave and propagation

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Antennas wave and propagation

  1. 1. Antennas and Propagation Key points
  2. 2. 2 Introduction  An antenna is a transducer that converts radio frequency electric current to electromagnetic waves that are radiated into space  In two-way communication, the same antenna can be used for transmission and reception
  3. 3. 3 Fundamental Antenna Concepts  Reciprocity  Radiation Patterns  Isotropic Radiator  Gain  Polarization
  4. 4. 4 Reciprocity  In general, the various properties of an antenna apply equally regardless of whether it is used for transmitting or receiving  Transmission/reception efficiency  Gain  Current and voltage distribution  Impedance
  5. 5. 5 Radiation Patterns  Radiation pattern  Graphical representation of radiation properties of an antenna  Depicted as a two-dimensional cross section  Reception pattern  Receiving antenna’s equivalent to radiation pattern
  6. 6. 6 Radiation Patterns (cont.)  Beam width (or half-power beam width)  Measure of directivity of antenna
  7. 7. 7 Antenna Gain  Antenna gain  Power output, in a particular direction, compared to that produced in any direction by an isotropic antenna  Effective area  Related to physical size and shape of the antenna
  8. 8. 8 Antenna Gain (cont.)  Relationship between antenna gain and effective area  G  antenna gain  Ae  effective area  f  carrier frequency  c  speed of light (≈ 3 x 108 m/s)  λ  carrier wavelength
  9. 9. 9 Antenna Gain (cont.)  An antenna with a G = 3dB improves over the isotropic antenna in that direction by 3dB or a factor of 2
  10. 10. 10 Polarization  Defined as the orientation of the electric field (E-plane) of an electromagnetic wave  Types of polarization  Linear  Horizontal  Vertical  Circular
  11. 11. 11 Polarization  Vertically Polarized Antenna  Electric field is perpendicular to the Earth’s surface  e.g., Broadcast tower for AM radio, “whip” antenna on an automobile  Horizontally Polarized Antenna  Electric field is parallel to the Earth’s surface  e.g., Television transmission (U.S.)  Circular Polarized Antenna  Wave radiates energy in both the horizontal and vertical planes and all planes in between
  12. 12. 12 Polarization
  13. 13. 13 Types of Antennas  Isotropic antenna  Idealized  Radiates power equally in all directions  Omnidirectional  Dipole antennas  Half-wave dipole antenna  Hertz antenna  Quarter-wave vertical antenna  Marconi antenna  Parabolic Reflective Antenna
  14. 14. 14 Dipole Antenna http://www.rfcafe.com/references/electrical/antenna_patterns.htm Power radiated Azimuth
  15. 15. 15 Propagation Modes  Ground-wave propagation  Sky-wave propagation  Line-of-sight propagation
  16. 16. 16 Ground Wave Propagation  Follows contour of the earth  Can propagate considerable distances  Frequencies up to 2 MHz  Example  AM radio
  17. 17. 17 Sky Wave Propagation  Signal reflected from ionized layer of atmosphere back down to earth  Signal can travel a number of hops, back and forth between ionosphere and earth’s surface  Reflection effect caused by refraction  Examples  Amateur radio  CB radio
  18. 18. 18 Line-of-Sight Propagation  Transmitting and receiving antennas must be within line of sight  Refraction  Bending of microwaves by the atmosphere  Velocity of electromagnetic wave is a function of the density of the medium  When wave changes medium, speed changes  Wave bends at the boundary between mediums
  19. 19. 19 Line-of-Sight Equations  Optical line of sight  Effective (or radio) line of sight  d = distance between antenna and horizon (km)  h = antenna height (m)  K = adjustment factor to account for refraction, rule of thumb K = 4/3 hd 57.3= hd Κ= 57.3
  20. 20. 20 Line-of-Sight Equations  Maximum distance between two antennas for LOS propagation:  h1 = height of antenna one  h2 = height of antenna two ( )21max 57.3 hhd Κ+Κ=
  21. 21. 21 LOS Wireless Transmission Impairments  Attenuation and attenuation distortion  Free space loss  Noise  Atmospheric absorption  Multipath  Refraction  Thermal noise
  22. 22. 22 Attenuation  Strength of signal falls off with distance over transmission medium  Attenuation factors for unguided media:  Received signal must have sufficient strength so that circuitry in the receiver can interpret the signal  Signal must maintain a level sufficiently higher than noise to be received without error  Attenuation is greater at higher frequencies, causing distortion
  23. 23. 23 Free Space Loss  Free space loss  Ideal isotropic antenna  Pt = signal power at transmitting antenna  Pr = signal power at receiving antenna  λ = carrier wavelength  d = propagation distance between antennas  c = speed of light (≈ 3 x 108 m/s) where d and λ are in the same units (e.g., meters)
  24. 24. 24 Free Space Loss
  25. 25. 25 Free Space Loss  Free space loss accounting for gain of other antennas  Gt = gain of transmitting antenna  Gr = gain of receiving antenna  At = effective area of transmitting antenna  Ar = effective area of receiving antenna
  26. 26. 26 Categories of Noise  Thermal Noise  Intermodulation noise  Crosstalk  Impulse Noise
  27. 27. 27 Thermal Noise  Thermal noise due to agitation of electrons  Present in all electronic devices and transmission media  Cannot be eliminated  Function of temperature  Particularly significant for satellite communication
  28. 28. 28 Thermal Noise  Amount of thermal noise to be found in a bandwidth of 1Hz in any device or conductor is:  N0 = noise power density in watts per 1 Hz of bandwidth  k = Boltzmann's constant = 1.3803 × 10-23 J/o K  T = temperature, in kelvins (absolute temperature) ( )W/Hzk0 TN =
  29. 29. 29 Thermal Noise  Noise is assumed to be independent of frequency  Thermal noise present in a bandwidth of B Hertz (in watts):  or, in decibel-watts TBN k= BTN log10log10klog10 ++= BT log10log10dBW6.228 ++−=
  30. 30. 30 Noise Terminology  Intermodulation noise  Occurs if signals with different frequencies share the same medium  Crosstalk  Unwanted coupling between signal paths http://www.cabletesting.comhttp://www.cabletesting.com
  31. 31. 31 Noise Terminology  Impulse noise  Irregular pulses or noise spikes  Short duration and of relatively high amplitude  Caused by external electromagnetic disturbances, or faults and flaws in the communications system
  32. 32. 32 Other Impairments  Atmospheric absorption  Water vapor and oxygen contribute to attenuation  Multipath  Obstacles reflect signals so that multiple copies with varying delays are received  Refraction  Bending of radio waves as they propagate through the atmosphere
  33. 33. 33 Fading in Mobile Environment  Fading  Time variation of received signal power caused by changes in transmission medium or path(s)
  34. 34. 34 Multipath Propagation (MP)  Reflection  Occurs when signal encounters a surface that is large relative to the wavelength of the signal  Diffraction  Occurs at the edge of an impenetrable body that is large compared to wavelength of radio wave  Scattering  Occurs when incoming signal hits an object whose size is in the order of the wavelength of the signal or less
  35. 35. 35 The Effects of MP Propagation  Multiple copies of a signal may arrive at different phases  If phases add destructively, the signal level relative to noise declines, making detection more difficult  Known as Intersymbol Interference (ISI)
  36. 36. 36 Types of Fading  Fast fading  Slow fading  Flat fading  Selective fading  Rayleigh fading  Rician fading
  37. 37. 37 Fading Source: Prakash Agrawal, D., Zeng, Q., “Introduction to Wireless and Mobile Systems,” Brooks/Cole-Thompson Learning, 2003 .

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