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Designing a human centred mindset to lead at the edge

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Workshop delivered by Huddle Academy for ALIA Online 2015, February 2, Sydney, Australia.

Workshop outline: Customer expectations are continually increasing, demanding more personalised and customised services and experiences. As a result, understanding your customers and designing services and experiences for them is critical in drawing them to engage with your organisation. Simultaneously it is essential to understand the people in your organisation and enable them to be adaptive to changing needs and to provide them with enjoyable and meaningful work experiences. This means being in service to your customers as well as the people who work in your organisation.

This one day workshop is for those who are seeking to be more effective leaders through developing a human centred mindset. It will focus on building your understanding of the value and principles of being human centred. These principles include putting people first through being empathic, curious, collaborative, and courageous. You will learn methods for how you can better understand your customers and your organisation for the benefit of designing and delivering amazing services and experiences. We will do this through a range of practical hands on activities where you will have the opportunity to experience a set of tools you can apply within your workplace.

Published in: Business

Designing a human centred mindset to lead at the edge

  1. 1. 1 Hello amazing people! Welcome to Designing a human centred mindset to lead at the edge.
  2. 2. Step one: Admin-y bits.
  3. 3. Dr Zaana Howard Huddle Academy Lead @zaana | zaanahoward.com @wearehuddle | wearehuddle.com
  4. 4. Human centred design Morning tea Mindsets Lunch Empathy Afternoon tea Empathy in practice Reflection All the things.
  5. 5. Be present Done, not perfect Be open Work together Be flexible Circle of trust Ground rules.
  6. 6. The marshmallow challenge.
  7. 7. The challenge. 20 pieces of spaghetti 1 metre string 1 metre tape 1 marshmallow 18 minutes = a tower of what height?
  8. 8. Instructions. 1. Build the tallest free standing structure. 2. The entire marshmallow must be on top. 3. Use as much or as little of the kit. 4. Break up the spaghetti, string or tape. 5. The challenge lasts 18 minutes.
  9. 9. 18 minutes. Go!
  10. 10. Measure up.
  11. 11. Reflection. http://www.ted.com/talks/tom_wujec_build_a_tower?language=en
  12. 12. What is human centred design?
  13. 13. Human centred design Service design Customer experience Design thinking others? 13
  14. 14. Key = people.
  15. 15. Customer first Be curious Be collaborative Be courageous Customer led by design principles.
  16. 16. 4 Customer first. Being in service of. A customer is a person you are in service of. They might be an internal customer within an organisation or an external customer of a product or service the organisation creates. Have empathy for your customer. Engage with and seek to understand all aspects of them. Observe customers and their behaviour in the context of their environment, experience and lives. Put aside your own bias, and understand the underlying problem. Always seek understanding of context and don’t get lost in the particulars. This requires a holistic view which questions how everything fits together.
  17. 17. 5 Be curious. Always learning. Curiosity and learning underpins creativity. Allow yourself to be curious and inquisitive about the world. See everything as if for the first time. Cultivate the inner detective in you, and investigate things that interest you, that naturally draw your attention. Be non-judgemental and accepting. Ask why a lot. Be playful in your curiosity and follow your instincts. Prototype to think and learn. Experiment with existing things, build new things, test them. See how they go in the wild. If it doesn’t work, learn from it and go again.
  18. 18. HUDDLEACADEMY•ACT1 6 PRINCIPLES•BECOLLABORATIVE Be collaborative. Valuing diversity. Collaboration is enabled through considered conversation and reflection. A group of people collaborating opens up more opportunity and possibility than an individual working solo as per the saying ‘all of us is smarter than any of us’. Multiple perspectives enables a holistic understanding of a situation. Bring together people with varied backgrounds and viewpoints. Be inclusive and value people’s diverse perspectives and experiences. Enable breakthrough insights and solutions to emerge from diversity. Build upon ideas and create together. When collaborating and reflecting be humble, honest and respectful. Be objective, enabling and open. Be present and bring lightness.
  19. 19. 7 Be courageous. Believing in possibility. Have courage to believe anything is possible. Know that any challenge can be overcome with creativity and collaboration. Courage is a belief in the power of creativity and people. It is underpinned by optimism and a belief that you have a say in creating the future, even when things are messy or complex. Being courageous seeks to know truth which means giving yourself the permission to challenge and question. It exudes confidence and clarity, while being authentic, honest and respectful.
  20. 20. Design maturity.
  21. 21. 10 Design process and practice. The design process can be depicted in a multitude of ways. While the stages often have different labelling the overall sentiment of the process stages is consistent. Design moves from process to practice through experience and mastery. The design process is often depicted as linear. This matches traditional modes of working and in business. As mastery develops through experience the true iterative nature of design becomes apparent, and that it cannot be represented or conducted in a linear fashion. THE DOUBLE DIAMOND WAS ORIGINALLY CREATED BY THE UK DESIGN COUNCIL. HUDDLE’S DESIGN PRACTICE MODEL. Discover Define Develop Deliver Gathering Story telling Reflecting Creating Foundations Making sense Design process and practice. The design process can be depicted in a multitude of ways. While th have different labelling the overall sentiment of the process stages is Design moves from process to practice through experience and mas The design process is often depicted as linear. This matches traditional modes of working and in business. As mastery deve true iterative natu and that it canno in a linear fashion THE DOUBLE DIAMOND WAS ORIGINALLY CREATED BY THE UK DESIGN COUNCIL. HUDDLE Discover Define Develop Deliver Reflecting Foundation
  22. 22. 10 Design process and practice. The design process can be depicted in a multitude of ways. While the stages often have different labelling the overall sentiment of the process stages is consistent. Design moves from process to practice through experience and mastery. The design process is often depicted as linear. This matches traditional modes of working and in business. As mastery develops through experience the true iterative nature of design becomes apparent, and that it cannot be represented or conducted in a linear fashion. THE DOUBLE DIAMOND WAS ORIGINALLY CREATED BY THE UK DESIGN COUNCIL. HUDDLE’S DESIGN PRACTICE MODEL. Discover Define Develop Deliver Gathering Story telling Reflecting Creating Foundations Making sense HUDDLEACADEMY•ACT5 10 FRAMING•DESIGNPROCESSANDPRACTICE cess and practice. can be depicted in a multitude of ways. While the stages often ing the overall sentiment of the process stages is consistent. process to practice through experience and mastery. is often depicted as linear. ional modes of working and As mastery develops through experience the true iterative nature of design becomes apparent, and that it cannot be represented or conducted in a linear fashion. DIAMOND WAS ORIGINALLY THE UK DESIGN COUNCIL. HUDDLE’S DESIGN PRACTICE MODEL. e Develop Deliver Gathering Story telling Reflecting Creating Foundations Making sense Design process and practice. The design process can be depicted in a multitude of ways. While the stages often have different labelling the overall sentiment of the process stages is consistent. Design moves from process to practice through experience and mastery. The design process is often depicted as linear. This matches traditional modes of working and in business. As mastery develops through experience the true iterative nature of design becomes apparent, and that it cannot be represented or conducted in a linear fashion. THE DOUBLE DIAMOND WAS ORIGINALLY CREATED BY THE UK DESIGN COUNCIL. HUDDLE’S DESIGN PRACTICE MODEL. Discover Define Develop Deliver Gathering Story telling Reflecting Creating Foundations Making sense
  23. 23. 10 Design process and practice. The design process can be depicted in a multitude of ways. While the stages often have different labelling the overall sentiment of the process stages is consistent. Design moves from process to practice through experience and mastery. The design process is often depicted as linear. This matches traditional modes of working and in business. As mastery develops through experience the true iterative nature of design becomes apparent, and that it cannot be represented or conducted in a linear fashion. THE DOUBLE DIAMOND WAS ORIGINALLY CREATED BY THE UK DESIGN COUNCIL. HUDDLE’S DESIGN PRACTICE MODEL. Discover Define Develop Deliver Gathering Story telling Reflecting Creating Foundations Making sense Design process and practice. he design process can be depicted in a multitude of ways. While the stages often ave different labelling the overall sentiment of the process stages is consistent. esign moves from process to practice through experience and mastery. The design process is often depicted as linear. This matches traditional modes of working and in business. As mastery develops through expe true iterative nature of design becom and that it cannot be represented o in a linear fashion. THE DOUBLE DIAMOND WAS ORIGINALLY CREATED BY THE UK DESIGN COUNCIL. HUDDLE’S DESIGN PRACTICE MOD Discover Define Develop Deliver Gathering Story telling Reflecting Crea Foundations Makin ign process and practice. sign process can be depicted in a multitude of ways. While the stages often ifferent labelling the overall sentiment of the process stages is consistent. moves from process to practice through experience and mastery. e design process is often depicted as linear. s matches traditional modes of working and business. As mastery develops through experience the true iterative nature of design becomes apparent, and that it cannot be represented or conducted in a linear fashion. THE DOUBLE DIAMOND WAS ORIGINALLY CREATED BY THE UK DESIGN COUNCIL. HUDDLE’S DESIGN PRACTICE MODEL. Discover Define Develop Deliver Gathering Story telling Reflecting Creating Foundations Making sense
  24. 24. Fill your cup.
  25. 25. 25 Human centred mindset.
  26. 26. Mindset = perspective. Determines how you behave & interact in the world.
  27. 27. Mindset comprises of intention and stance.
  28. 28. Stance.
  29. 29. Intention.
  30. 30. Mindset Knowledge sets Skill sets Tool sets From Nelson & Stolterman (2013), The Design Way. Competency sets.
  31. 31. Mindset Knowledge Set Skill Set Tool Set Key focus in design is knowledge, skill & tool sets. Competency sets. From Nelson & Stolterman (2013), The Design Way.
  32. 32. Mindset is the secret sauce.
  33. 33. Beginner’s mind: the mindset of forever learning, seeing things a new, living in the present not in the past. Liquid mind: ability to change perspectives and positions on things. Open mind: inviting to new perspectives and beliefs. Creative mind: belief in the ability that everything is up for question, anything can be changed in creative ways. Disciplined mind: practices of mindfulness that nurture our mindset. Aware mind: situational awareness Whole mind: seeing the whole, connected system. © This is Dr Harold Nelson and Huddle’s intellectual property. Attributes of a human centred leadership mindset.
  34. 34. Experience: when we rely too much on experience, we prevent seeing things a new. Expertise: knowing what type of expertise we have, and what type we need. Singular perspective: believing that your perspective is the only one and is right. Lack of awareness: not being mindful and aware of the whole situation. Object focus: Focus on the thing, rather than the system. Lack of courage: yep. Externalisation: believing that the solution or problem is external to you. Habits that block this mindset. © This is Dr Harold Nelson and Huddle’s intellectual property.
  35. 35. TWO MINDSETS: GENERATIVE + RECEIVING Belief in agency Sense of self Locus of control Influencing factors.
  36. 36. TWO MINDSETS: GENERATIVE + RECEIVING It’s a continuum. +
  37. 37. Knowledge, skill and tool sets are tangible.
  38. 38. Mindset is more like air and is intangible.
  39. 39. Mindset changes how knowledge, skill & tool sets can be applied.
  40. 40. Shifting mindset shifts the outcomes.
  41. 41. You choose the mindset you bring.
  42. 42. Dr Carol Dweck “You have a choice. Mindsets are just beliefs. They’re powerful beliefs, but they’re just something in your mind, and you can change your mind.”
  43. 43. Mindset enactment. 43
  44. 44. Beginner’s mind: the mindset of forever learning, seeing things a new, living in the present not in the past. Liquid mind: ability to change perspectives and positions on things. Open mind: inviting to new perspectives and beliefs. Creative mind: belief in the ability that everything is up for question, anything can be changed in creative ways. Disciplined mind: practices of mindfulness that nurture our mindset. Aware mind: situational awareness Whole mind: seeing the whole, connected system. Attributes of a human centred leadership mindset. Experience: when we rely too much on experience, we prevent seeing things a new. Expertise: knowing what type of expertise we have, and what type we need. Singular perspective: believing that your perspective is the only one and is right. Lack of awareness: not being mindful and aware of the whole situation. Object focus: Focus on the thing, rather than the system. Lack of courage: yep. Externalisation: believing that the solution or problem is external to you. Habits that block this mindset. © This is Dr Harold Nelson and Huddle’s intellectual property.
  45. 45. 45 Mindset enactment reflection.
  46. 46. 46 20 MINDSET Learning for development. WHAT The mindful reflection canvas is a structured tool that guides you through a process of reflecting on a situation to learn, celebrate successes and identify opportunities for development. WHY Reflection allows you to continuously learn and improve your work and practice. It is important to not only reflect on the factual aspects of the situation but also your mindset, emotions and actions. WHEN This can be used at any time to reflect on a challenge, a situation, an opportunity or a project. It can be used individually or in a team PROGRAM CONTEXT This is the framework to enable you to reflect upon how you have applied customer led mindsets within different situations. TOOL #6 Mindful reflection. Reflect, learn, go again.
  47. 47. 47 Mindful reflection. WHAT PRINCIPLE AM I REFLECTING ON? WHAT SITUATION AM I REFLECTING ON? WHAT DID I DO SUCCESSFULLY? WHAT QUESTIONS DO I HAVE? WHAT DID I FIND CHALLENGING? WHAT WOULD I DO DIFFERENTLY NEXT TIME?
  48. 48. Fill your belly.
  49. 49. EMPATHY Empathy. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Evwgu369Jw
  50. 50. 50 We show empathy through curiosity & being in service of others.
  51. 51. Self Customers Colleagues Organisation Four levels of empathy.
  52. 52. Open ended questions. How questions. Prompt answers regarding the process of interaction. Why questions. Prompt people to discuss reasons for their choices and behaviour. What questions. Assist in understanding the situation or to obtain clarity. Contextual curiosity.
  53. 53. Channels we listen from. Channel 0: tuned out self displacement - not present Channel 1: ego judgmental - listening to self Channel 2: affirming familiar - listening for similarity Channel 3: critical factual - listening for evidence Channel 4: empathic dialogue - with other about other Channel 5: generative insight - with self for other Listening & awareness channels. © This is Dr Harold Nelson and Huddle’s intellectual property.
  54. 54. Deep design.
  55. 55. Deep Design Schema. LEVEL 1 APPEARANCES AND EXPERIENCES How would you describe the appearance and experiences of your chosen personal artefact? LEVEL 2 OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES How would you describe the objective of your artefact? What outcomes does it achieve? LEVEL 3 DIRECTION AND STANCE How would you describe the importance this artefact has within the context of your life journey? How does it influence your state of being in this journey? LEVEL 4 HIGHER PURPOSE Why is this artefact so important to you? Adapted from Nelson & Stolterman (2013), The Design Way.
  56. 56. 56 Reflection.
  57. 57. Stretch!
  58. 58. Empathy in practice.
  59. 59. HUMANIC Humanic factors include the people involved and their relationship, their behaviour, emotions and appearance. ENVIRONMENTAL Environmental factors include the space (physical or virtual), and the sensory presentation and perception of the situation or experience. This can includes what people see, smell, hear, taste and feel. Environmental factors often create expectations and provide first impressions of the situation. FUNCTIONAL Functional factors are largely related to the technical quality and reliability of the process within the situation. It asks if the service or experience is dependable and accurate. It sets the baseline expectation for how things are or should be within the situation. Contributing factors to complex situations. There are three main factors to consider to assist in understanding and mapping a complex situation or experience. These are humanic factors, contextual and environmental factors and functional factors. Factors are often interrelated and interdependent. HUMANIC FUNCTIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL Adapted from Berry, LL, Wall, EA, & Carbone, LP. (2006). Service clues and customer assessment of service experience: Lessons from marketing. Academy of Management, May, 43-57.
  60. 60. HUMANIC • Who are the actors involved? What are they doing? • How do they behave? • How are they feeling? • How do the actors relate? ENVIRONMENTAL • What are the geographic elements? • Where is the space? • How is the space set up? • What is the context of the situation? • What are people seeing, smelling, hearing, tasting and feeling? FUNCTIONAL • Does the process flow? • Does everything work as it should? • Is it reliable and dependable? Considerations in complex situations. The three main factors assist in understanding and creating the what, how and wow of the situation or experience. In mapping a complex situation there are several questions related to each factor to consider: These create the ‘how’ of the service or experience. Within this the understanding of and commitment to people within the situation is revealed. It represents the emotional perception of quality and creates the ‘wow’. This creates the ‘what’ of the situation or experience. It reveals the reliability, competence and cognitive perception of quality. It represents the baseline expectation within a service or experience. HUMANIC FUNCTIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL Adapted from Berry, LL, Wall, EA, & Carbone, LP. (2006). Service clues and customer assessment of service experience: Lessons from marketing. Academy of Management, May, 43-57.
  61. 61. 15 HUDDLEACADEMY•ACT4TOOLS•MAPPINGCOMPLEXSITUATIONS Mapping complex situations.Mapping complex situations. WHAT IS THE SITUATION YOU ARE MAPPING? HUMAN • Who are the people? • How do they relate and behave? FUNCTIONAL • What is the process? • Does it work as expected? ENVIRONMENTAL • What is the physical environment? • What do you see, hear, taste, smell and feel? Start by choosing one factor to map. Overlay the other two factors in relation to the first. Depending on which factor you start with, the situation will map differently. TOOL TEMPLATE
  62. 62. How might we…?
  63. 63. HUDDLEACADEMY•ACT2 14 TOOLS•HOWMIGHTWE? MINDSET Creating possibility. WHAT The how might we framework provides a guide to creating open and actionable questions to ideate and design from. WHY How might we questions provide an opportunity to consider a problem or opportunity from a generative perspective. It opens possibility – as well as providing a scope to focus upon. WHEN How might we questions can be used in a range of circumstances: to create design questions to guide the design process; to provide a frame to ideate solutions from. It is also useful to use ‘how might we’ questions to reflect on the design process itself (for example how might we iterate this current solution?) PROGRAM CONTEXT You used the How might we? framework to develop a design question for a persona in the context of the holiday journey mapping activity. TOOL #3 How might we? What is possible?
  64. 64. How might we? MIX AND MATCH NEEDS AND INSIGHTS TO CREATE A DESIGN QUESTION FOR YOUR SITUATION PROBLEM OR OPPORTUNITY What problem or opportunity are you focusing on today? NEEDS What needs have you identified? What needs to be achieved? What is the desired outcome? INSIGHT What have you learned about the situation? What interesting things did you find? What conclusions can you draw? HOW MIGHT WE SO THAT ? HOW MIGHT WE SO THAT ? HOW MIGHT WE SO THAT ?
  65. 65. Reflection.
  66. 66. “And it ought to be remembered that there is nothing more difficult to take in hand, more perilous in conduct, or more uncertain in its success, than to take the lead in the introduction of a new order of things. Because the innovator has for enemies all those who have done well under the old conditions, and lukewarm defender in those who may do well under the new.” Machiavelli The Prince A word on courage. (intended as a message to provide thought).
  67. 67. Exhale.
  68. 68. Fin. Dr Zaana Howard Huddle zaana@wearehuddle.com wearehuddle.com

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