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Open Educational Resources and Practices for Language Vitality: the Case of Latgalian

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Open Educational Resources and Practices for Language Vitality: the Case of Latgalian
Sanita Lazdiņa and Ilga Šuplinska

Published in: Education
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Open Educational Resources and Practices for Language Vitality: the Case of Latgalian

  1. 1. Open Educational Resources and Practices for Language Vitality: the Case of Latgalian (Latvia) Sanita Lazdiņa, Ilga Šuplinska Rēzekne Academy of Technologies (Latvia) Conference Open Education: promoting diversity for European languages 26 – 27 September 2016, Brussels
  2. 2. Overview 1. Latgalian: a Short Background 2. Language Vitality and New Domains and Media 3. OER and Learning to Apply New Digital Tools: A Few Examples 4. From Language Practices towards Policies
  3. 3. 1 Latgalian: a Short Background Census 2011: • Language used as dominant home language in Latvia: • 62% Latvian (including Latgalian) • 37% Russian • 8.8% of the population (165,000 individuals) of Latvia report that they use Latgalian on an everyday basis • Latgale: 35.5% use Latgalian regularly
  4. 4. Latgalian - vulnerable UNESCO Atlas of the World's Languages in Danger http://www.unesco.org/languages-atlas/index.php
  5. 5. http://www.unesco.org/new/en/culture/themes/endangered-languages/language-vitality/
  6. 6. OER and Learning to Apply New Digital Tools: A Few Examples • Creating a video: learning about history from individual stories of children and older people (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l9PFeDc7_cg) • Creating subtitles (educational materials in more than one language) http://amara.org/lv/videos/bA4zlEWzBzC3/info/consumer-and- producer-surplus-ar-lv-subtitriem/
  7. 7. OER and Learning to Apply New Digital Tools • Changing roles: pupils as teachers of digital competence • Interdisciplinarity (diverse contents in different languages) • Changing perspectives: lesser-used languages in an attractive frame • Learning to share (for free!)
  8. 8. How do language practices at schools reflect official and non-official language policies? • Language practices at schools depend on and reflect local actors (municipal authorities, schools, regional universities, etc.) • Official educational frameworks (curricular planning, languages of instruction) reflect the role of the state language. • At the same time, educational institutions are much more flexible than other official domains to react to the ethnodemografic composition of the population • Language practices at schools also reflect debates among educators and researchers: how to move forward from monolingual towards multilingual habits in education (from One language-only language policy at schools into Translanguaging (Adamson & Fujimoto-Adamson, 2012)).
  9. 9. sanita.lazdina@ru.lv ilga.suplinska@ru.lv

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