Data-to-Action: Building Middle School Administrators’
and Teachers’ Data Literacy Capacity
in Durham Public Schools
4/10/...
Desired Outcomes
• Describe actions, strategies, and trainings within DPS that support the
development of a Data-to-Action...
3
Responses to Data
Significance of Data Literacy Training
• Increase emphasis on
developing high-
quality, data literate
school administrator...
What Does it Mean to Be Data Literate?
A data literate person possesses the
knowledge to gather, analyze, synthesize,
and ...
Skills of a Data Literate Person
Data
Location
Data
Comprehension
Data
Interpretation
Instructional
Decision Making
Questi...
Data Location
• The ability to find relevant data
• The ability to manipulate data from a complex
table or graph to suppor...
Data Interpretation
• Examining score distributions
• Understanding the effects of outliers
• Appreciating limits of gener...
Data Use for Instructional Decision Making
• Understanding the value of scale scores and item
level data
• Using student d...
Question Posing
• Aligning questions with purpose and data
• Forming queries that lead to actionable data
• Appreciating t...
Four Types of Data
4/10/2014 11
Type Definition Example
1) Achievement or
Assessment Data
Data used to determine the level...
Assessment and Achievement Data Tiers
4/10/2014 12
Assessment
Purpose
Rate of
Feedback
Type of
Feedback
Example Primary Ta...
Questions to Guide Achievement
Data Collections
• What evidence can we collect about our students’ learning?
• What eviden...
Locating Achievement or Assessment Data
•PAPA Datamining Reports
•Achievement Series
• State Testing Portal
•mClass
Local
...
Types of Demographic Data
Student Demographics
• Gender
• Ethnicity
• Limited English Proficiency
• Exceptional Children
•...
What is a Program Evaluation (PE)?
What is a Program
Evaluation?
• A program evaluation is a
purposeful, systematic, and
c...
Why Evaluate Programs?
Evaluations are conducted to:
• Gain insight about a program and its operations – to see where we
a...
What are the Types of Evaluations?
Formative Evaluations
 Evaluability assessment
 Implementation
evaluation
 Needs ass...
Examples of the Types of PEs
Formative Evaluations
 Evaluability assessment
 Implementation evaluation
 Needs assessmen...
Examples of the Types of PEs
Summative Evaluations
 Cost-effectiveness and cost-benefit
analysis
 Impact evaluation
 Me...
Constituents of School Level Perception
Data
4/10/2014 21
Internal Constituents External Constituents
Students and Parents...
Guiding Questions for Collecting Perception
Data
• How do the members of our school community feel about our
school and di...
Educate…Previous vs. Now
Previous
• ABCs
• Grade-level Proficiency
focus
• Different state and
federal models
Now
• NC REA...
Objectives of Data Literacy Trainings
• Discuss components of NC READY state model
• Review the federal and state Annual
M...
Educate… 2012-13 NC READY and AMO Guide
• NC READY Indicators: Definitions
• State and Federal Annual Measurable Objective...
Ma
End of Grade/
End of Course
(reading, mathematics,
science)
ACT
Graduation Rates
Math Course Rigor
WorkKeys
Graduation ...
Communicate…
Our School’s 2012-2013 Data Announcement
• Performance Composite
• School-wide Growth Status
• Strengths
• Ar...
System of Supports
Communication
Do you need help
framing your story?
Understanding Data
Do you need help
understanding yo...
Systems of Support
COMMUNICATION
• Public Information
and Community
Engagement
(PICE)
DATA SUPPORT
• Research and
Accounta...
Next Steps
School Improvement
Plan Review and
Revisions
Student Intervention-
School Level Reports
in coming weeks
EVAAS V...
Research and Accountability
December 4, 2013
“It’s not about giving the
assessments; it’s about
doing something about
the ...
Data Release
• After the initial release of the data, we will do
the following, as a middle school:
– Review the data with...
Data Analysis Process
Essential Questions: AMO Targets
34
Question to Guide Student AMO Targets Discussion.
What are our biggest AMO target chal...
Essential Questions: Proficiencies
35
Questions to Guide Student Proficiencies Discussion.
1) Where are our biggest opport...
Essential Questions: EVAAS Growth
36
Questions to Guide Education Value Added Assessment System (EVAAS)
Discussion.
1)
2)
...
Elementary Area School-Level
EOG Test Proficiency Questions
37
Essential Questions to Guide the Elementary Area School-Lev...
Impact of Data Literacy on Teaching
and Learning
• Data literacy capacity building will lead to continuous analysis of:
NC...
Discussion
Brainstorm…
• How are you building data literacy capacity in
your school/district?
• Which groups are you focus...
Discussion
Brainstorm…
• Through what types of professional
development activities are you building your
school’s/district...
Deputy Superintendent’s Support for
Building Data Literacy Amongst All DPS
Stakeholders
4/10/2014 41
Deputy Superintendent’s Support for
Building Data Literacy Amongst All DPS
Stakeholders
Teaming for Excellence
• Documents...
Deputy Superintendent’s Support for
Building Data Literacy Amongst All DPS
Stakeholders
Teaming for Excellence
• The goals...
Deputy Superintendent’s Support for
Building Data Literacy Amongst All DPS
Stakeholders
• Develop and Offer 2013 NC READY ...
Deputy Superintendent’s Support for
Building Data Literacy Capacity in DPS
• Develop and Offer 2013 NC READY and AMO Data
...
Deputy Superintendent, Area Superintendents, and Research and Accountability
2013-14
Central Office/School
Administrator D...
Deputy Superintendent’s Support for
Building Data Literacy Capacity in DPS
Area Networks
• Implement Area Networks for the...
48
Middle School
Area Network
Area
Networks
High School Area
Network
Elementary Area
Network
Area Networks
Purpose
Central Services departments provide rapid response
services to each Area of schools through coordin...
50
To improve
communication
between Central
Services
departments and
schools
Area Networks
Desired
Outcomes
To increase th...
Area Networks
Structure
Each Area Superintendent will lead the assigned
network. The Executive Leadership supervisor will
...
Area Networks
Members
4/10/2014 52
Network Members Network Members
Curriculum, Instruction, and
Assessment
Research and Ac...
Middle School Area Network
Team Meeting 1
1. Establish a Middle School Area Network Working
Plan
2. Discussion of MSAN Dat...
Middle School Area Network
Team Meeting 2
1. Updates from the current Middle School Network Working
Plan (planning days, d...
Middle School Area Network
Team Meeting 3
1. Reporting out from Work Group collaboration
55
Data Dives
Who?
Teachers
School
Admins
School-level
Instructional
Support
Central
Office
Instructional
Support
4/10/2014 56
57
Continuous
School and
District Data
Analysis
Data Dive
Objectives
Re-teaching for
Mastery
Identification of
Learning Ob...
Deputy Superintendent’s Support for
Building Data Literacy Capacity in DPS
Focus Schools
• Implementation of Area Focus Sc...
Middle School Area Superintendent’s
Support for Building Data Literacy
Capacity in Focus Middle Schools
• Three collaborat...
Focus School Data Analysis
60
Data Sets
(CS
Depts)
NC READY
(AS/R&A/
CIA)
AMO
(AS/R&A/
CIA)
EVAAS
(AS/R&A/
CIA)AIG/EC/
ESL...
Focus Middle Schools
61
Focus
Middle
Schools
Carrington
MS
Shepard
MS
W.G.
Pearson
Magnet
MS
Neal
MS
Lowe’s
Grove
MS
Sherw...
Focus School Team (School)
62
Focus
School
Team
ESL/LEP
Facilitator
School
Principal
School
Improvement
Team
RtI
Facilitat...
Focus School Team (District)
63
Focus
School
Team
Middle
School
Area
Supt. MS Area
Facilitators
(CIA, EC,
etc)
Executive
D...
Focus Middle School
Team Goals
1. Pre-Meeting Analysis of the Data
2. Discussion of the Data
3. Introduction to the Focus ...
Focus Middle School
Team Meeting 1
1. Pre-Meeting Analysis of the Data
2. Discussion of the Data
3. Introduction to the Fo...
Leaders and Learners Field Trips
Leaders
&
Learners
MS
Principals
ES
Principals
Central
Services
Staff
HS
Principals
66
Leaders and Learners Field Trips
L & L
Field
Trips
Piedmont
Open IB MS
(Charlotte-
Meck)
Stories
Creek ES
(Union)
Rock
Res...
4/10/2014 68
Data Literacy Capacity Building
Review
Principals
Central Office Data
Summit
Area Data
Dives
Data Literacy Ca...
4/10/2014 69
Data Literacy Capacity Building
Next Steps
Leaders and Learners Field Trip (3/13/14)
(Charlotte-Meck./Guilfor...
Lessons Learned
• Time must be protected for principals’/central office data literacy skills to
be developed (Monthly Prin...
“If you want to lift ten pounds, you can do it by
yourself. If you want to lift two-hundred pounds
you’d better have a tea...
Discussion
Brainstorm…
• Are there questions or comments concerning
data literacy capacity building in DPS, your
middle sc...
Dr. Stacey Wilson-Norman
Deputy Superintendent of Academic Services
stacey.wilson-norman@dpsnc.net
Dr. Terri Mozingo
Assis...
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Building Data Literacy Among Middle School Administrators and Teachers

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Building Data Literacy Among Middle School Administrators and Teachers
Data literacy is an essential trait for middle school administrators and teachers to possess. In this session, the Research and Accountability Team from Durham Public Schools will discuss how it has expanded its focus on Data-to-Action to building data literacy amongst its middle school administrators and teachers during 2013-14.
J. Brent Cooper, Terri Mozingo & Karin Beckett Durham Public Schools - Durham, NC

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  • There are four types of data. Achievement/Assessment Data, Demographic Data, Program Data and Perception Data.
  • Notes: Tier III assessments are designed primarily for accountability purposes. While the primary target of the feedback are policy makers, board members, community members and administrators, tier III data can also be used by curriculum teams to evaluate the effectiveness of curriculum. Teachers, students and parents can also use Tier III data although it has limited use for these groups because it is only administered once a year.Tier II assessments provides immediate results of student performance in key standards-based skills in a content area and grade level. The assessments are administered periodically throughout the year. They are used to assist teachers and administrators in tracking student progress, strengths and weaknesses in particular content areas. They should be used to create fluid instructional groups. Data should be used in Professional Learning Communities.Tier I occurs at the classroom level. Assessing students should be a natural part of every teachers repertoire. This repertoire should include multiple measures that will assess the depth of each students conceptual understanding as well as their knowledge and skills.
  • All data should be collected in 5 year increments so that trends can be viewed and predictions made. Data should be organized in a way that will facilitate comparisons from year to year. I recommend an EXCEL spreadsheet.
  • The entire testing landscape has changed. The ABC model has been replaced with the new NC READY accountability model. While the ABCs focused on grade-level proficiency, NC READY focuses on proficiency as well as college and career readiness. The AYP performance targets have been replaced with AMO targets.Additionally, this model changes how we evaluate teachers but we will discuss this further at the Nov. 14 meeting.
  • Today we hope that you will leave with a clear understanding of the components of the NC READY Accountability Model as well as the how the federal and state AMOs are tracked and calculated. Later on today, we will also provide you with your school-level data reports. I have asked PICE, your area superintendent and R&A to provide on-site assistance with the goal of helping you understand your data, communicate your results and address any another needs you may have as a school leader.
  • The NC READY Accountability Model measures school performance in 3 ways.Status Indicators answer the question: How well are students doing this year? The indicators make-up the performance composite score and gives the community an overall impression of the school achievement. The performance composite score focuses on proficiency.Growth Indicators answer the question: Given where students start, how much was the school able to help them grow? The school growth indicator utilizes EVAAS to determine if a school has: not met, met or exceeded school-wide growth levels. Please note we will not discuss teacher effectiveness today.Progress Indicators answer the question: How much progress are cohorts making from one year to the next on the performance indicators? This data allows us to look at data over time to determine trends.
  • You can announce your school’s performance composite, growth status as a school.You can share overall general thoughts regarding your school’s specific strengths (i.e., Reading/ELA EOG, English II EOC, attendance). *I would focus on 2-3 big rocks.You can share overall general thoughts regarding your school’s specific areas of opportunity (i.e., science, math in all grades, participation).*I would not go into details with subgroup, or grade/content specific details at this time. The focus on today’s meeting is to ensure that everyone is prepared to hear the release. A data meeting should be scheduled after November 7th.
  • We are here to offer you support in interpreting the dataWe will provide you with toolkit for both your staff and your parents
  • From this point on we will:-revisit our SIP-identify specific students who need intervention and attention-we will talk more about our EVAAS data in the coming weeks-clearly communicate with our community that we know that this is not a surprise, that this is our baseline year and we look forward to moving the needle, and we will continue our focus on every child growing.
  • Building Data Literacy Among Middle School Administrators and Teachers

    1. 1. Data-to-Action: Building Middle School Administrators’ and Teachers’ Data Literacy Capacity in Durham Public Schools 4/10/2014 1 2014 North Carolina Association of Middle Level Educators Conference (NCAMLE) March 17, 2014 Dr. J. Brent Cooper Dr. Terri Mozingo
    2. 2. Desired Outcomes • Describe actions, strategies, and trainings within DPS that support the development of a Data-to-Action, data literate culture amongst central office/school administrators and teachers. • Share ways school administrators’ data literacy skills have been developed through work with the Deputy Superintendent of Academic Services, Dr. Stacey Wilson-Norman, and Research and Accountability during 2013-14. • Present the Area Network Model as applied to the work of the Middle School Area Network through the leadership of Dr. Julie Spencer, Middle School Area Superintendent. • Summarize lessons learned. • Project the course of Data Literacy trainings for the rest of 2013-14 and for the 2014-15 school year. 2
    3. 3. 3 Responses to Data
    4. 4. Significance of Data Literacy Training • Increase emphasis on developing high- quality, data literate school administrators to lead schools. • Empower principals and central office leaders to develop data literate assistant principals and teachers. 4
    5. 5. What Does it Mean to Be Data Literate? A data literate person possesses the knowledge to gather, analyze, synthesize, and convey information graphically and in writing to support decision making. 4/10/2014 5
    6. 6. Skills of a Data Literate Person Data Location Data Comprehension Data Interpretation Instructional Decision Making Question Posing 4/10/2014 6U.S. Department of Education report Teachers' Ability to Use Data to Inform Instruction: Challenges and Supports (2011) Find Data Evaluate Data Use Data
    7. 7. Data Location • The ability to find relevant data • The ability to manipulate data from a complex table or graph to support reasoning 4/10/2014 7In the U.S. Department of Education report Teachers' Ability to Use Data to Inform Instruction: Challenges and Supports (2011).
    8. 8. Data Interpretation • Examining score distributions • Understanding the effects of outliers • Appreciating limits of generalizability • Understanding measurement error 4/10/2014 8U.S. Department of Education report Teachers' Ability to Use Data to Inform Instruction: Challenges and Supports (2011).
    9. 9. Data Use for Instructional Decision Making • Understanding the value of scale scores and item level data • Using student data to plan differentiated instruction based on student needs • Synthesizing multiple data sources to inform instructional practices 4/10/2014 9 U.S. Department of Education report Teachers' Ability to Use Data to Inform Instruction: Challenges and Supports (2011),.
    10. 10. Question Posing • Aligning questions with purpose and data • Forming queries that lead to actionable data • Appreciating the value of multiple measures 4/10/2014 10 U.S. Department of Education report Teachers' Ability to Use Data to Inform Instruction: Challenges and Supports (2011), the research team identified five skills
    11. 11. Four Types of Data 4/10/2014 11 Type Definition Example 1) Achievement or Assessment Data Data used to determine the level of student achievement in a particular content area Performance-based assessments, written exams, or quizzes 2) Demographic Data Data that provides descriptive information about the school community and the students served in the community Enrollment, gender, ethnicity, economic status, student attendance, grade levels, school suspensions, limited English proficiency status, and special education status 3) Program Data Data that defines the programs, instructional strategies, and classroom practices of the teachers Assessment/Achievement Data, Attendance, Perception Data, and Implementation Records 4) Perception Data Data that tells us what students, parents, staff, and others think about the learning environment Questionnaires, interviews, surveys, and observations Source: Guide to Using Data in School Improvement Efforts: A Compilation of Knowledge From Data Retreats and Data Use at Learning Points Associates (December 2004)
    12. 12. Assessment and Achievement Data Tiers 4/10/2014 12 Assessment Purpose Rate of Feedback Type of Feedback Example Primary Target of Feedback Tier IV (Federal) Annual large scale testing for Federal Accountability Infrequent General and broad Condition of Education Federal and State Policymakers Tax payers Administrators Tier III (State) Annual large scale testing for accountability Infrequent General and broad Summative End-of-Grade Exams End of Course Exams Policymakers Board Members Community Administrators Tier II (District) Periodic grade level and subject area Infrequent/ Frequent Specific and Formative Local Assessments Administrators Teachers Tier I (Classroom) On-going classroom Frequent Specific and narrow Formative Unit exams Classroom projects Homework Class work Teachers Students
    13. 13. Questions to Guide Achievement Data Collections • What evidence can we collect about our students’ learning? • What evidence do we have that shows the knowledge, skills, and understandings our students have achieved? • Which data indicate the degree to which our students show the conceptual understandings and generalizations in our standards? • What evidence shows which students are meeting or exceeding our achievement expectations and which are not? • What do we know about how each individual student learns? 4/10/2014 13
    14. 14. Locating Achievement or Assessment Data •PAPA Datamining Reports •Achievement Series • State Testing Portal •mClass Local (Tier II) •NCDPI – Data and Statistics Website •University of North Carolina General Administration •Education Value-Added Assessment System (EVAAS) State (Tier III) • National Assessment of Educational Progress • Federal Data Warehouse National (Tier IV) 4/10/2014 14
    15. 15. Types of Demographic Data Student Demographics • Gender • Ethnicity • Limited English Proficiency • Exceptional Children • Parent Characteristics School Demographics • Mobility Patterns • School Transportation Needs • LEP and EC Participation Rates • Suspension/ Expulsion Rates • Promotions / Retention Rates • Graduation/ Dropout Rates • Free/Reduced Lunch Percentages • Neighborhood Characteristics • Parent Involvement • Behavior and Social Problems of Students4/10/2014 15
    16. 16. What is a Program Evaluation (PE)? What is a Program Evaluation? • A program evaluation is a purposeful, systematic, and careful collection and analysis of programs, establishing accountability, and identifying areas needing change and improvement. What are the goals of a Program Evaluation? 16 • The generic goal of most evaluations is to provide “useful feedback” to a variety of audiences including sponsors, donors, client-groups, administrators, staff, and other relevant constituencies.
    17. 17. Why Evaluate Programs? Evaluations are conducted to: • Gain insight about a program and its operations – to see where we are going and where we are coming from, and to find out what works and what doesn’t. • Improve practice – to modify or adapt practice to enhance the success of activities. • Assess program effects to determine how well we are meeting the goals and objectives, how the program benefits the community, and to provide evidence of effectiveness. • Help build capacity by increasing funding, enhancing skills, and strengthening accountability. 17
    18. 18. What are the Types of Evaluations? Formative Evaluations  Evaluability assessment  Implementation evaluation  Needs assessment  Process evaluation  Structured conceptualization Summative Evaluations  Cost-effectiveness and cost-benefit analysis  Impact evaluation  Meta-analysis  Outcome evaluations  Secondary analysis 18
    19. 19. Examples of the Types of PEs Formative Evaluations  Evaluability assessment  Implementation evaluation  Needs assessment  Process evaluation  Structured conceptualization Examples of FPEs  Afterschool Programs  Common Core Implementation  Dropout Programs  Helpdesk Process  Literacy Program 19
    20. 20. Examples of the Types of PEs Summative Evaluations  Cost-effectiveness and cost-benefit analysis  Impact evaluation  Meta-analysis  Outcome evaluations  Secondary analysis Examples of SPEs  One-to-One Laptop Initiatives  Online Instruction  Effects of Early Education on Kindergarten Readiness  Science, Math, Engineering and Technology (STEM) Program  School Management Practices on Student Performance 20
    21. 21. Constituents of School Level Perception Data 4/10/2014 21 Internal Constituents External Constituents Students and Parents Community Citizens Teachers and Staff Community Businesses Administrators Regional Colleges and Universities School Board
    22. 22. Guiding Questions for Collecting Perception Data • How do the members of our school community feel about our school and district? • How satisfied are school community members about our educational programs? • What do the members of our school community perceive to be the strengths and needs of our school? • What do members of our business community think about the skills of our graduates? 4/10/2014 22
    23. 23. Educate…Previous vs. Now Previous • ABCs • Grade-level Proficiency focus • Different state and federal models Now • NC READY • Career and College- Ready focus • Closing Achievement Gaps • State and Federal share AMOs and targets • Teacher Effectiveness 23
    24. 24. Objectives of Data Literacy Trainings • Discuss components of NC READY state model • Review the federal and state Annual Measurable Objectives (AMOs) • Review the 2012-13 Data Reports • Discuss implications of data and next steps • Provide additional support to schools 24
    25. 25. Educate… 2012-13 NC READY and AMO Guide • NC READY Indicators: Definitions • State and Federal Annual Measurable Objectives (AMOs) Indicators (Federal, State, and AMO Definition) • AMOs Terminology/Definitions 4/10/2014 25
    26. 26. Ma End of Grade/ End of Course (reading, mathematics, science) ACT Graduation Rates Math Course Rigor WorkKeys Graduation Project Δ End of Grade/ End of Course (reading, mathematics, science) Δ ACT Δ Graduation Rates Δ Math Course Rigor Status Indicators “this year” Progress Indicators “trend over time for groups of students” Growth Indicators “combined individual student’s growth” 26 EVAAS Growth School-wide Δ WorkKeys
    27. 27. Communicate… Our School’s 2012-2013 Data Announcement • Performance Composite • School-wide Growth Status • Strengths • Areas of Opportunity 27
    28. 28. System of Supports Communication Do you need help framing your story? Understanding Data Do you need help understanding your data? Next Steps Do you need help with next steps? 28
    29. 29. Systems of Support COMMUNICATION • Public Information and Community Engagement (PICE) DATA SUPPORT • Research and Accountability NEXT STEPS • Area Support (Elementary, Midd le, High School) 29
    30. 30. Next Steps School Improvement Plan Review and Revisions Student Intervention- School Level Reports in coming weeks EVAAS Value-Added Reporting - More information after Thanksgiving Communicating with the Community – No Surprise, Baseline Year, Continue Focus on Growth 30
    31. 31. Research and Accountability December 4, 2013 “It’s not about giving the assessments; it’s about doing something about the results” Dr. Doug Reeves (2005) EVAAS Growth AMO Targets Proficiencies Academic Services Data Summit Research Articles
    32. 32. Data Release • After the initial release of the data, we will do the following, as a middle school: – Review the data with our School Improvement Team – Review student data to determine if we need to provide intervention – Provide teachers more information about the EVASS value-added data that is included in Standard 6 of the teacher evaluation instrument – Host a Parent Meeting to go over our school data 32
    33. 33. Data Analysis Process
    34. 34. Essential Questions: AMO Targets 34 Question to Guide Student AMO Targets Discussion. What are our biggest AMO target challenges?
    35. 35. Essential Questions: Proficiencies 35 Questions to Guide Student Proficiencies Discussion. 1) Where are our biggest opportunities to move students to proficiency? 2) How have the new cut scores impacted AIG Proficiencies? 3) How will the new AMO’s goal impact AIG Identification?
    36. 36. Essential Questions: EVAAS Growth 36 Questions to Guide Education Value Added Assessment System (EVAAS) Discussion. 1) 2) In what grade levels are students experiencing academic growth? In what grade levels are students not experiencing academic growth? 3) 4) In what schools are students are experiencing academic growth? In what schools are students not experiencing academic growth? 5) 6) In what subjects are students experiencing academic growth? In what subjects are students not experiencing academic growth? 7) 8) 9) In what grade are teachers not demonstrating teaching effectiveness? In what schools are teachers not demonstrating teaching effectiveness? In what subjects are teachers not demonstrating teaching effectiveness? 10) 11) 12) 13) In what schools are minority students experiencing the greatest achievement gaps? In what subjects are minority students experiencing the greatest achievement gaps? In what schools are exceptional students experiencing the greatest achievement gaps? In what subjects are exceptional students experiencing the greatest achievement gaps?
    37. 37. Elementary Area School-Level EOG Test Proficiency Questions 37 Essential Questions to Guide the Elementary Area School-Level EOG Test Proficiency Discussion 1) Are there schools with large opportunities for EOG test proficiency improvements (Focus Schools) for multiple grades levels and/or student groups? 2) Are there schools with declining EOG test proficiency when analyzing a school’s data across grades for all student groups, which could lead to a negative effect on feeder middle schools 6th grade students’ proficiency? 3) Are there student groups with opportunities for EOG test proficiency improvements in the Elementary Area?
    38. 38. Impact of Data Literacy on Teaching and Learning • Data literacy capacity building will lead to continuous analysis of: NC READY, AMO, and EVAAS data, and in turn local assessment data. • Student achievement data will be analyzed for the school and district by: grade level, test, gender, student group, and by teacher. • Program evaluations will be completed internally and externally for many current DPS programs (process was developed and approved, Summer 2013).
    39. 39. Discussion Brainstorm… • How are you building data literacy capacity in your school/district? • Which groups are you focusing on building data literacy capacity during this school year? 39
    40. 40. Discussion Brainstorm… • Through what types of professional development activities are you building your school’s/district’s data literacy capacity? • What are your school’s/district’s goals in building data literacy capacity? 40
    41. 41. Deputy Superintendent’s Support for Building Data Literacy Amongst All DPS Stakeholders 4/10/2014 41
    42. 42. Deputy Superintendent’s Support for Building Data Literacy Amongst All DPS Stakeholders Teaming for Excellence • Documents were created and Data Release Meetings were planned in a collaborative effort by: 1- the Superintendent 2- Deputy Superintendent 3- Academic Services 4- Research and Accountability and 5- Public Information and Community Engagement (PICE) 42
    43. 43. Deputy Superintendent’s Support for Building Data Literacy Amongst All DPS Stakeholders Teaming for Excellence • The goals of these efforts were: • Ensure an understanding of the NC READY, AMO, and EVAAS Data and that principals were well prepared when they communicated the accountability results to all DPS Stakeholders • Create a Data Release Toolkit to support the principals • Ensure that terms were understood and specific points were clarified • Develop Data Release Guides 43
    44. 44. Deputy Superintendent’s Support for Building Data Literacy Amongst All DPS Stakeholders • Develop and Offer 2013 NC READY and AMO Data Release Training Sessions for principals by school level (area), (October- November 2013) • Data Release Guides developed for school administrators by School Level • Data Release Toolkit developed to educate all DPS Stakeholders about the release of NC READY, AMO, and EVAAS data • Data Release parent and faculty meetings planned with corresponding ConnectEd messages created and sent to educate all DPS Stakeholders about the release of NC Ready, AMO, and EVAAS data 44
    45. 45. Deputy Superintendent’s Support for Building Data Literacy Capacity in DPS • Develop and Offer 2013 NC READY and AMO Data Literacy Training Sessions for Principals, October- November 2013 • Develop and Offer 2013 Central Office Data Literacy Summit for Central Office Instructional Support, December 2013 45
    46. 46. Deputy Superintendent, Area Superintendents, and Research and Accountability 2013-14 Central Office/School Administrator Data Literacy Capacity Identification of Area Focus Schools 2012-13 NC READY Data Dives Establishment of Area Networks Steps to Building Data Literacy Capacity in DPS 2012-13 NC READY Data Summits
    47. 47. Deputy Superintendent’s Support for Building Data Literacy Capacity in DPS Area Networks • Implement Area Networks for the Elementary, Middle, and High School Areas to focus data analysis and data literacy capacity building, December 2013. • Conduct quarterly Data Dives for School Administrators and Central Office Instructional Support in our continuous data analysis, modification, and re-teaching of curriculum objectives, Spring 2014-Fall 2015. 47
    48. 48. 48 Middle School Area Network Area Networks High School Area Network Elementary Area Network
    49. 49. Area Networks Purpose Central Services departments provide rapid response services to each Area of schools through coordinated collaboration and communication around key issues. The purpose of these meetings are to remove barriers, address issues and respond to school needs in a timely and effective manner. Each meeting should be results- based with clear action items and timelines to address barriers for schools. 4/10/2014 49
    50. 50. 50 To improve communication between Central Services departments and schools Area Networks Desired Outcomes To increase the level of accountability To provide coordinated and responsive services to schools
    51. 51. Area Networks Structure Each Area Superintendent will lead the assigned network. The Executive Leadership supervisor will assign individuals to the appropriate network to provide leadership and service for their respective departments. Every Network will have representation for content areas and departments. All networks will meet for two hours the 3rd Wednesday of the month. A standing agenda has been designed to ensure efficient, consistent and effective monthly meetings. 4/10/2014 51
    52. 52. Area Networks Members 4/10/2014 52 Network Members Network Members Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment Research and Accountability Exception Children’s Program Area Facilitators Human Resources Student, Family, and Community Services Leadership Development Title I State Transformation Team
    53. 53. Middle School Area Network Team Meeting 1 1. Establish a Middle School Area Network Working Plan 2. Discussion of MSAN Data and the purpose of making data-driven decisions 3. Introduction to the MSAN Purpose 4. Creation and administration of Middle School Network Priority Survey- identify the most important problems which need immediate attention from the MSAN 53
    54. 54. Middle School Area Network Team Meeting 2 1. Updates from the current Middle School Network Working Plan (planning days, data dives, Focus Middle School support, mentors, etc.) 2. Comprehensive Planning…what is the Middle School Area Network’s #1 problem to be addressed by the MSAN 3. Data Driven Problem Solving- problem solving in a particular area based on a data point with resulting action items 4. Establish MSAN Work Groups around major problems which need immediate attention from the MSAN. 54
    55. 55. Middle School Area Network Team Meeting 3 1. Reporting out from Work Group collaboration 55
    56. 56. Data Dives Who? Teachers School Admins School-level Instructional Support Central Office Instructional Support 4/10/2014 56
    57. 57. 57 Continuous School and District Data Analysis Data Dive Objectives Re-teaching for Mastery Identification of Learning Objectives Not Met
    58. 58. Deputy Superintendent’s Support for Building Data Literacy Capacity in DPS Focus Schools • Implementation of Area Focus School Models in an effort to provide extra resources to schools with greater academic needs. • Focus Schools identified by an analysis of the previous year’s NC READY, AMO, and EVAAS data, Fall 2014-15. • Six Focus Middle Schools were identified to provide additional central services support for the remainder of the 2013-14 school year. 58
    59. 59. Middle School Area Superintendent’s Support for Building Data Literacy Capacity in Focus Middle Schools • Three collaborative Focus School Team Meetings between Focus Middle School School Improvement Teams and Central Services Support Staff held at the Focus School. • The Focus Middle School team includes representatives from the multiple Central Services departments. 59
    60. 60. Focus School Data Analysis 60 Data Sets (CS Depts) NC READY (AS/R&A/ CIA) AMO (AS/R&A/ CIA) EVAAS (AS/R&A/ CIA)AIG/EC/ ESL (CIA/EC/ ESL) Discipline: PBIS/OSS (SFCS) Staffing (HR)
    61. 61. Focus Middle Schools 61 Focus Middle Schools Carrington MS Shepard MS W.G. Pearson Magnet MS Neal MS Lowe’s Grove MS Sherwood Githens MS
    62. 62. Focus School Team (School) 62 Focus School Team ESL/LEP Facilitator School Principal School Improvement Team RtI Facilitator AIG Facilitator EC Facilitator
    63. 63. Focus School Team (District) 63 Focus School Team Middle School Area Supt. MS Area Facilitators (CIA, EC, etc) Executive Director of ESL Coordinator of MS Staffing District AIG Coordinator District PBIS Coordinator
    64. 64. Focus Middle School Team Goals 1. Pre-Meeting Analysis of the Data 2. Discussion of the Data 3. Introduction to the Focus School Purpose 4. Identification of Action Items for the Next Meeting 64
    65. 65. Focus Middle School Team Meeting 1 1. Pre-Meeting Analysis of the Data 2. Discussion of the Data 3. Introduction to the Focus School Purpose 4. Identification of Action Items for the Next Meeting 65
    66. 66. Leaders and Learners Field Trips Leaders & Learners MS Principals ES Principals Central Services Staff HS Principals 66
    67. 67. Leaders and Learners Field Trips L & L Field Trips Piedmont Open IB MS (Charlotte- Meck) Stories Creek ES (Union) Rock Rest ES (Person) Dudley HS (Guilford) 67
    68. 68. 4/10/2014 68 Data Literacy Capacity Building Review Principals Central Office Data Summit Area Data Dives Data Literacy Capacity Building 2013-14
    69. 69. 4/10/2014 69 Data Literacy Capacity Building Next Steps Leaders and Learners Field Trip (3/13/14) (Charlotte-Meck./Guilford/Person/Union) Char Area Networks Symposium (Monthly) Summer Leadership Retreat June 2014 Spring 2013-14 and Beyond
    70. 70. Lessons Learned • Time must be protected for principals’/central office data literacy skills to be developed (Monthly Principals’ Meetings, Monthly Area Principals’ Academies, Area Networks, School/Area/Curriculum and Instruction Data Dives). • Principals must go back to their schools and develop the data literacy capacity of the assistant principals and teachers (Faculty Meetings, Grade and Subject-Level PLCs, School Improvement Teams). • Data literacy skills must be applied to a comprehensive school and district-level analysis of NC READY and EVAAS data. • Data literacy capacity building is a continuous process. • Data literacy capacity building will support Data-to-Action, data-driven decisions. 70
    71. 71. “If you want to lift ten pounds, you can do it by yourself. If you want to lift two-hundred pounds you’d better have a team.” ~old adage 71 T - Take time to build the foundation E - Engage in data-driven dialogue A - Act together to improve instruction M - Monitor implementation and results
    72. 72. Discussion Brainstorm… • Are there questions or comments concerning data literacy capacity building in DPS, your middle school(s), or your school district? 72
    73. 73. Dr. Stacey Wilson-Norman Deputy Superintendent of Academic Services stacey.wilson-norman@dpsnc.net Dr. Terri Mozingo Assistant Superintendent of Research and Accountability terri.mozingo@dpsnc.net Dr. Julie Spencer Middle School Area Superintendent julie.spencer@dpsnc.net Dr. J. Brent Cooper Data Analyst, Program Evaluator, Coordinator of Surveys and Research jason.cooper@dpsnc.net 73
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