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2012 nov df_ple

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  • 1. Designing Personal Learning Environments: Staff and Student Considerations in a Digital Landscape Professor Mike Keppell Executive Director Australian Digital Futures Institute 1Wednesday, 14 November 12 1
  • 2. Overview ‣ Horizon trends and challenges ‣ Personal Learning Environments ‣ Spaces ‣ Tools ‣ People ‣ Academic learning spaces ‣ Student learning spaces ‣ ICulture ‣ Disconnecting ‣ Ecological university 2Wednesday, 14 November 12 2
  • 3. Horizon Trends ‣ People expect to be able to work, learn, and study whenever and wherever they want. ‣ The abundance of resources and relationships will challenge our educational identity. ‣ Students want to use their own technology for learning. ‣ Teaching paradigms across all sectors are shifting to include online learning, hybrid learning and collaborative models. ‣ 3Wednesday, 14 November 12 3
  • 4. Challenges n Seamless learning – people expect to be able to work, learn, and study whenever and wherever they want. n Digital literacies – capabilities which fit an individual for living, learning and working in a digital society (JISC) n Personalisation - our learning, teaching, place of learning, technologies will be individualised n Digital scholarship will be the norm. 4Wednesday, 14 November 12 4
  • 5. References n Johnson, L., Adams, S., Cummins, M., and Estrada, V. (2012). Technology Outlook for STEM+ Education 2012-2017: An NMC Horizon Report Sector Analysis. Austin, Texas: The New Media Consortium n Sharples, M., McAndrew, P., Weller, M., Ferguson, R., FitzGerald, E., Hirst, T., Mor, Y., Gaved, M. and Whitelock, D. (2012). Innovating Pedagogy 2012: Open University Innovation Report 1. Milton Keynes: The Open University. 5Wednesday, 14 November 12 5
  • 6. Personal Learning Environments Interactions Spaces Tools PLE People Interactions Interactions 6Wednesday, 14 November 12 6
  • 7. Spaces 7Wednesday, 14 November 12 7
  • 8. Personal Learning Spaces ‣ Personal Learning Environments (PLE) integrate formal and informal learning spaces ‣ Customised by the individual to suit their needs and allow them to create their own identities. ‣ A PLE recognises ongoing learning and the need for tools to support life-long and life- wide learning. 8Wednesday, 14 November 12 8
  • 9. Wednesday, 14 November 12 9
  • 10. Distributed Learning Spaces Physical Blended Virtual Formal Informal Formal Informal Mobile Personal Academic Professional Outdoor Practice 10Wednesday, 14 November 12 10
  • 11. Distributed Learning Spaces n Book Chapter: http:// www.slideshare.net/ mkeppell/distributed- spaces-for-learning 11Wednesday, 14 November 12 11
  • 12. Tools 12Wednesday, 14 November 12 12
  • 13. Professional Virtual Learning SpacesWednesday, 14 November 12 13
  • 14. Wednesday, 14 November 12 14
  • 15. Wednesday, 14 November 12 15
  • 16. People 16Wednesday, 14 November 12 16
  • 17. Wednesday, 14 November 12 17
  • 18. Connectivism ‣ PLE may also require new ways of learning as knowledge has changed to networks and ecologies (Siemens, 2006). ‣ The implications of this change is that improved lines of communication need to occur. ‣ “Connectivism is the assertion that learning is primarily a network-forming process” (p. 15). 18Wednesday, 14 November 12 18
  • 19. Personal Learning Environments Interactions Spaces Tools PLE People Interactions Interactions 19Wednesday, 14 November 12 19
  • 20. Academic Learning Spaces n Physical, blended or virtual ‘areas’ that: n enhance academic ‘work’ n that motivate academic ‘work’ n enable networking n Spaces where academics optimize the perceived and actual affordances of the space. 20Wednesday, 14 November 12 20
  • 21. Discursive Spaces n Intellectual and discursive spaces focus on the contribution to public discourse in areas such as: n e.g. presentations, media, advising, translating research into practical benefits, community involvement, etc n MOOCs? 21Wednesday, 14 November 12 21
  • 22. Epistemological Spaces n Epistemological spaces focus on the “space available for academics to pursue their own research interests” (p. 76). n e.g. labs, libraries, collaborations and networking with university colleagues 22Wednesday, 14 November 12 22
  • 23. Pedagogical and Curricular Spaces n Pedagogical and curricular spaces focus on the spaces available to trial new pedagogical approaches and new curricular initiatives. n e.g. physical and virtual sandpits, working groups, meetings, etc n MOOCs? 23Wednesday, 14 November 12 23
  • 24. Wednesday, 14 November 12 24
  • 25. Wednesday, 14 November 12 25
  • 26. Ontological Spaces n Ontological spaces focus on ‘academic being’ which is becoming increasingly multi-faceted beyond the research, teaching and community commitments. In fact “the widening of universities’ ontological spaces may bring both peril and liberation” (p. 77). n MOOCs? n e.g.diverse roles may include: academic staff developer, professional developer, manager, administrator, facilitator, teacher, researcher, evaluator, presenter, writer, editor, consultant, project manager, change agent and innovator. 26Wednesday, 14 November 12 26
  • 27. Barnett, R. (2011). Being a university. New York: Routledge.Wednesday, 14 November 12 27
  • 28. Wednesday, 14 November 12 28
  • 29. iCulture? 29Wednesday, 14 November 12 29
  • 30. ICulture?Wednesday, 14 November 12 30
  • 31. Wednesday, 14 November 12 31
  • 32. Wednesday, 14 November 12 32
  • 33. Ecological University n Global connectedness and dependence on world around them n Instead of ‘having an impact’ on the world which can be both positive and negative ecological universities seek sustainability n They are self-sustainable in their multiple levels of interactions. n They adopt a ‘care for the world’ as opposed to an ‘impact on the world’ approach (Barnett, 2011). 33Wednesday, 14 November 12 33
  • 34. Ecological University nNetworked university nValues and fosters its networks and their interconnectedness nFeels a responsibility to the well-being of these networks (Barnett, 2011). 34Wednesday, 14 November 12 34
  • 35. Conclusions ‣ Importance of documenting our PLE ‣ Pros and cons of PLEs ‣ Balancing the higher purpose ‣ Being able to disconnect 35Wednesday, 14 November 12 35
  • 36. Questions? 36Wednesday, 14 November 12 36