Dr Andrea CorbettSocial Business Consultant
Using Enterprise Social Networks to              Today’sa n d d e v e l o p m e n t    support learning                   ...
Current challenges to learningCopyright m-hance 2011           3
The nature of work has changed                         Hierarchies      Networks    Artisans ~ 19th Century               ...
Industrial Revolution            Frederick Winslow Taylor            Scientific Management (1911)                         ...
Collaborative revolution         Increasing          Dizzying rate of change         complexity                         Wo...
So what is Collaborative Learning?• Knowledge is created through the interaction and  collaboration of individuals• Everyo...
Learning timeline   Traditional    training                 Computer                            Collaborative &           ...
How learning has changedIndividual learning                                            Collaborative learning             ...
Hierarchy   Network Passive student                                         Active learner                  Courses, works...
“Teach people how to fish or better yet,    teach them how to learn to fish             themselves.”                      ...
What is an Enterprise Social Network?Copyright m-hance 2011               12
Mind the Gap   Consumer web                               The Enterprise• New tools/behaviour                         • Tr...
• Email goes out to 5 Colleagues• First user sends a direct reply  but does not copy in other 4.• Another user sends a dif...
Where do we learn?      Organisation                                       Water cooler            MentorsLearn from mista...
"if only HP knew what HP knows, we would be three times more productive."   Lew Platt   Former chief executive of Hewlett-...
Fundamental concepts• Supports the concept of a rich user profile.• Allows users to communicate with each other in a way t...
Enterprise Social Network                                         Focussed topic groups                     Microblogging ...
The three C‟sConnect                   Contribute               Cultivate  Build relationships     Share your experiences ...
Copyright m-hance 2011   20
David - Sales                                 Follow                                              Products                ...
Benefits in relation to learning anddevelopmentCopyright m-hance 2011                 22
Copyright m-hance 2011   23
Benefits of an ESN•    Keeping remote employees in touch     •   Social media monitoring     with the office              ...
Benefits for Collaborative Learning  • Creates knowledge through the interaction and    collaboration of individuals  • Ev...
Intangibles are becoming the primary source of value                         Social capital and know-how                  ...
The bottom line $900 billion-1.3 trillion (annual value that could be unlocked via social technologies in                 ...
From this
To This
How to make an ESN work forLearning and developmentCopyright m-hance 2011        30
It is about:•    Motivation•    Culture•    Behaviour•    Influencers•    Community Maturity                         Remem...
It is NOT about:•    organizing and managing training for people – but helping teams     and groups to self-organize the a...
Conclusion          “If you have an apple and I have an apple          and we exchange these apples then you          and ...
Dr Andrea Corbett                           Social Business Consultant                         andrea.corbett@m-hance.com ...
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Using Enterprise Social Networks to Suport Learning and Development - slides for presentation to the Training Journal Winter Conference - 10/12/12

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  • Going from 19th Century to 20th and 21st with increasing complexity.How can we free the great potential of intelligence, creativity and energy that is exploding onto the business network but which is still trapped in the bureaucracy of modern organizations?today we find ourselves in a time very similar to the industrial revolution, a time of great confusion. And for those of us who work in the world of organizations, it’s easy to see that in all of this confusion, traditional values and managerial models are heavily involved.
  • transform people into machines; divided work tasks into segments; depersonalized,control the work place; standardize work sounforeseen events.This type of organization worked well when the theme of the business was repetition. It becomes a model that works far less well when the nature of the business is knowledge-based, striving for constant innovation, within an intangible environment.Now innovation, passion and initiative Not diligence, repetition and obedience.
  • Witnessing a dizzying rate of change - overwhelmed by the explosion of knowledge.Everything is getting hooked up to everything else - This increases complexity and makes business unpredictableIntangibles are becoming the prime source of value. Social capital and know-how have replaced plant and equipment as economic value creators.Sharing control among all stakeholders. How can we free the great potential of intelligence, creativity and energy that is exploding onto the business network but which is still trapped in the bureaucracy of modern organizations?Find information and turn it into knowledge at the point of need gives a key competitive advantageKnowing the right people to ask is more likely to lead to success than internally held knowledge or skill.
  • Studies show that over 90% of the knowledge we need to do our work is not in our heads. Knowing the right people to ask is more likely to lead to success than internally held knowledge or skill.Informal and social learning is about accidental and serendipitous, personal, group and organisation. Find information and turn it into knowledge at the point of need gives a key competitive advantage
  • More networked organisations – nature of work has changed enabled by interconnected people and technology.
  • Indeed as learning and working become much more closely integrated, “learning” will not be seen as a separate activity requiring separate, dedicated learning systems or platforms, but will become embedded within normal workflow collaboration systems.A new approach will also mean that L&D will broaden its role from one that is focused on traditional “training” to one that helps people work and learn smarter in many new and varied ways. Jane HartPeople have always learned from their local networks but now it is the scale that has grown. Technology allows the boundaries of geography, time, department etc to be broken down.
  • The social learning revolution has only just begun. Businesses that understand the value of knowledge sharingteamworkinformal learningjoint problem solving Investing heavily in collaboration technologyAre reaping the early rewards~ Jay Cross
  • Still very young so trying to categorise it is difficult. There are many different solutions out there so comparing them is difficult.
  • Studies show that over 90% of the knowledge we need to do our work is not in our heads. Knowing the right people to ask is more likely to lead to success than internally held knowledge or skill.Informal and social learning is about accidental and serendipitous, personal, group and organisation. Find information and turn it into knowledge at the point of need gives a key competitive advantageHow can we free the great potential of intelligence, creativity and energy that is exploding onto the business network but which is still trapped in the bureaucracy of modern organizations?Knowing the right people to ask is more likely to lead to success than internally held knowledge or skill.
  • Mckinsey estimate the productivity gains in the four sectors in the US, UK, Germany and France combined will total $1.6 to $1.9 trillion.consumer packaged goodsconsumer financial servicesprofessional services advanced manufacturingMcKinsey estimate that the total annual value creation potential of using social technologies to improve communication, coordination and collaboration is $600 billion to $900 billion.
  • Motivation:What the business needs from the communityWhat is in it for the userIT’s role – do you go cloud?2. Culture:value and reward group participation over individual winners, Culture comes not only from the values, trust and collaborative support of the company's leadership; it is driven by how well people support each other andvalue collective intelligence relative to individual contributions. 3. Behavior:about making sure day-to-day use of social media technology serves the company's goals in practice. May need training in collaborationstarts with a clear purpose for the community, And just because you build it doesn't mean they will come. "What's in it for me?" incentive 4. Influencers:Who are they?LeadersNot just management but trusted mentors, champions etc5. Community Maturity:the ability, interest and trust of a group of people to use social networking technologies at work. critical factor that leaders must plan for when crafting a community of purpose framework. Plan and budget for low maturity – may need extra resources, tap experience of high maturity companies.When maturity's high, explore new ways to foster greater and broader participation. relinquish decision-making control to the community.
  • It certainly does not sit well with most organisations’ traditional “command and control” mentalities. It’s estimated that 75 percent of enterprise-level organizations will do so in 2013The most effective solutions are be content-centric, not technology centric.NOT a technology deployment and fail to understand that the new relationships created by enterprise social networks are the source for value creation. 1) Encourage sharing.2) Capture knowledge.3) Enable action.4) Empower employees.
  • Training Journal Conference slides

    1. 1. Dr Andrea CorbettSocial Business Consultant
    2. 2. Using Enterprise Social Networks to Today’sa n d d e v e l o p m e n t support learning lesson Enterprise Social Networks Current challenges to learning What is an Enterprise Social Network (ESN) Benefits in relation to learning and development How to make an ESN work for learning and development ConclusionCopyright m-hance 2011 2
    3. 3. Current challenges to learningCopyright m-hance 2011 3
    4. 4. The nature of work has changed Hierarchies Networks Artisans ~ 19th Century 21st Century 20th Century Source: Jay CrossCopyright m-hance 2011 4
    5. 5. Industrial Revolution Frederick Winslow Taylor Scientific Management (1911) Functional management Standard methods Enforced adoption Organisational hierarchiesCopyright m-hance 2011 5
    6. 6. Collaborative revolution Increasing Dizzying rate of change complexity Work and learn smarter in new and varied ways Intangibles are becoming the primary Learning embedded source of value within normal workflow collaboration systemsCopyright m-hance 2011 6
    7. 7. So what is Collaborative Learning?• Knowledge is created through the interaction and collaboration of individuals• Everyone is a teacher and a student• Driven by need and accountability• Integrated into the flow of work• Provides avenues for employees to engage• Can be explicit or implicitCopyright m-hance 2011 7
    8. 8. Learning timeline Traditional training Computer Collaborative & aided training Social learning Learning Informal & management blended systems learningCopyright m-hance 2011 8
    9. 9. How learning has changedIndividual learning Collaborative learning Formal learning Copyright m-hance 2011 9
    10. 10. Hierarchy Network Passive student Active learner Courses, workshops Conversation, discovery Pull learning Push learning Competence Grades Independence Obedience Knowledge is transitory GroupsUnchanging knowledge AloneOthers set the curriculum Learner defines content Copyright m-hance 2011 10
    11. 11. “Teach people how to fish or better yet, teach them how to learn to fish themselves.” Harold JarcheCopyright m-hance 2011 11
    12. 12. What is an Enterprise Social Network?Copyright m-hance 2011 12
    13. 13. Mind the Gap Consumer web The Enterprise• New tools/behaviour • Trapped in email• Transparency The enterprise • Legacy systems• Easy to use is getting left • Old ways of working behind and is • Not efficient• Innovation struggling to• Easy to find, connect, • Command/Control share, create, consume adapt to current changes in • Hard to navigate• Evolving behaviour and • Not adapting• Bold technology • Scared• Engaged • Disengaged• Collaborative • Knowledge silos 13
    14. 14. • Email goes out to 5 Colleagues• First user sends a direct reply but does not copy in other 4.• Another user sends a different response but copies in everyone.• Originator replies but does not copy everyone in.• Another user replies to all but does not realise that someone else has said the same thing because they have not opened up that email yet.• Originator sends direct email back to let them know they already have the answer. 14
    15. 15. Where do we learn? Organisation Water cooler MentorsLearn from mistakes Colleagues Team Performance support Formal learning High performers Copyright m-hance 2011 15
    16. 16. "if only HP knew what HP knows, we would be three times more productive." Lew Platt Former chief executive of Hewlett-Packard (HPQ)Copyright m-hance 2011 16
    17. 17. Fundamental concepts• Supports the concept of a rich user profile.• Allows users to communicate with each other in a way that is open and public by default.• Is based primarily on relationships defined by organisational membership not „friendship‟ (like Facebook).Copyright m-hance 2011 17
    18. 18. Enterprise Social Network Focussed topic groups Microblogging and discussionsIntegration with social networks People profiles Mobile access Integration with corporate systems # Files Tag cloud SearchingCopyright m-hance 2011 18
    19. 19. The three C‟sConnect Contribute Cultivate Build relationships Share your experiences Add Community Share your insight Debate Content Teach Innovate Tools Build skills Comment Experiences Build knowledge ImproveNecessary for your job Share ideas Application of ideas in new contexts Copyright m-hance 2011 19
    20. 20. Copyright m-hance 2011 20
    21. 21. David - Sales Follow Products Key Customers Benefits:• Customer / Product knowledge base Local Office• Better informed about product offers• Real time updates from ERP• Connected to Local office• Company Brand / Messaging Company Info• Competitor Knowledge / Battle cards• Increase Sales Competitors Copyright m-hance 2011 21
    22. 22. Benefits in relation to learning anddevelopmentCopyright m-hance 2011 22
    23. 23. Copyright m-hance 2011 23
    24. 24. Benefits of an ESN• Keeping remote employees in touch • Social media monitoring with the office • SharePoint integration• Keeping distributed sites connected • Connections outside the enterprise• Feeds from underlying systems • On-boarding• Knowledge base • Spot, recognise and reward talent• Searching • Flexibility and agility• Breaking down knowledge silos • Innovation support• Fewer meetings • Support enterprise culture• Employee engagement • Drive more profitable behaviour• Getting views from grass roots • Improved productivity• Top down communication • Win more sales opportunities• Lateral communication between • Brainstorm ideas departments • Manage projects together• Keeping in touch with industry • Solve customer issues news/trends/legislation • Connect with experts• People profiles • Collaborate without boundaries• Focussed topic groups and discussions Copyright m-hance 2011 24
    25. 25. Benefits for Collaborative Learning • Creates knowledge through the interaction and collaboration of individuals • Everyone is a teacher and a student • Copes with the increasing complexity of the enterprise • Manages change • Allows people to work and learn in smarter ways • Driven by need and accountability • Provides learning that is integrated into the flow of work • Increases employees engagement • No geographical or temporal boundariesCopyright m-hance 2011 25
    26. 26. Intangibles are becoming the primary source of value Social capital and know-how have replaced plant and equipment as economic value creators. Enterprise Social Networks provide the platform for knowledge to be learned and shared in an enterprise.Copyright m-hance 2011 26
    27. 27. The bottom line $900 billion-1.3 trillion (annual value that could be unlocked via social technologies in 2/3rds of that 4 sectors) value comes from communication and collaboration 20-25% improvement in between and across knowledge worker enterprises… productivity possible That‟s almost $600 billion-900 billionSource: McKinsey, The social economy: Unlocking value and productivity through social technologies Copyright m-hance 2011 27
    28. 28. From this
    29. 29. To This
    30. 30. How to make an ESN work forLearning and developmentCopyright m-hance 2011 30
    31. 31. It is about:• Motivation• Culture• Behaviour• Influencers• Community Maturity Remember: the most effective solutions are content-centric, not technology centric.Copyright m-hance 2011 31
    32. 32. It is NOT about:• organizing and managing training for people – but helping teams and groups to self-organize the approaches that will work for them• training people to use the social tools – but rather helping them to use them in the context of carrying out their work, and in doing so to work collaboratively and share their knowledge with one another• training people to be social – but modelling the new collaboration and community skills that will be required• tracking “learning” activity - but helping teams and groups monitor their own productivity and performance improvementsCopyright m-hance 2011 32
    33. 33. Conclusion “If you have an apple and I have an apple and we exchange these apples then you and I will still each have one apple. But if you have an idea and I have an idea and we exchange these ideas, then each of us will have two ideas.” George Bernard ShawCopyright m-hance 2011 33
    34. 34. Dr Andrea Corbett Social Business Consultant andrea.corbett@m-hance.com www.esnsurgery.com @DrACorbett www.m-hance.comCopyright m-hance 2011 34

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