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Designing Reflective Activities

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2k60906: A workshop presentation at IGNOU

2k60906: A workshop presentation at IGNOU

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  • 1. Designing Reflective Activities
      • Sanjaya Mishra
    Designing Reflective Activities Designing Reflective Activities
  • 2. Please think of something you are good at. Write how you became good at it.
    • Trial and error, reading, observing, experimentation, reflection
    • Reading, discussion, practice, reflection on practice
    • By doing it, by talking to people about it
    • Trying different methods, thinking about the issue , reflecting on mistakes
    Your responses could be anything of the following: IGNOU-STRIDE In summary, the following emerge:
    • Practice, Doing it
    • Trial and Error
    • Learning from mistakes
    • Reflecting
    Activity to begin with…
  • 3. Types of Activities Source: Mishra and Gaba (2001)‏ Activities Question-based Reflective Action-based With immediate feedback (e.g ITQ)‏ With model answer/ feedback at the end (e.g. SAQ)‏ With no answer but hints (e.g. Exercises)‏ Things to do (e.g. Collection of data)‏ Experiential (e.g. Writing a note after watching a TV programme)‏
  • 4. Why use activities?
    • Think for themselves
    • Come up with explanations/solutions
    • Sort out the features of an argument
    • Draw inferences
    • Relate own ideas and experiences to topic
    To help learners
  • 5.
    • Be exposed to competing ideas and views
    • Experience those tasks that are typical of the subject
    • Practice important objectives
    • Monitor progress
    • Check their understanding/mastery of the concepts and skills
    • Reflect on implications of their learning
    • Actively use the materials
    Why use activities? To provide opportunities for learners to:
  • 6. Importance of Reflection
    • Donald Schon (1983)‏
    • Reflection-in-action
    • Reflection-on-action
    • David Kolb (1984): Learning Cycle
    Concrete experience Abstract conceptualization Reflective observation Active experimentation
  • 7.
    • Dictionary meaning:
    • (n): 1. an instance of reflecting; 2. a thought, idea or opinion formed or a remark made as a result of mediation; 3. consideration of some subject matter, idea or purpose
    • (adj): marked by reflection: thoughtful, deliberate
    What is Reflection?
  • 8. John Dewey (1933): How we think?
    • Reflection is a meaning making process
    • Systematic, disciplined way of thinking
    • Reflection happen in community, in interaction with others
    • Reflection requires attitude that value the personal and intellectual growth of oneself and others.
  • 9. J. Mezirow (1977)‏
    • Non-reflective action
    • Habitual
    • Thoughtful
    • Introspection
    • Reflective action
    • Context
    • Process
    • Premise
  • 10. M. Van Manen (1977)‏ Technical Contextual Dialectical
  • 11. Sparks-Langer et al (1991)‏
    • Framework for Reflective thinking
    • No descriptive language
    • Simple layperson description
    • Events labeled with appropriate terms
    • Explanation with tradition or personal preference given as rationale
    • Explanation with principle or theory given as rationale
    • Explanation with principle or theory and consideration of context
    • Explanation with consideration of ethical, moral and political issues
  • 12. J. Moon (1999)‏
    • Meaningful, reflective, restructured by learner, creative
    • Meaningful, reflective, well structured
    • Meaningful, well integrated ideas linked
    • Reproduction of ideas, ideas not well linked, memorized representation
  • 13. Reflection is a constructivist way of learning
    • Construction of knowledge by learner
    • Active involvement of the learner
    • Non-linear way of learning
    • Opportunity to apply and question
    • Learning through experiential problem solving
    • Situated and contextual
  • 14. What is not reflection?
    • Recall
    • Define
    • Identify
    • List
    • All lower order behavioral objectives
  • 15. Designing Reflective activities Revised Blooms Taxonomy
    • Knowledge Domain
    • Factual
    • Conceptual
    • Procedural
    • Meta-cognitive
    Cognitive Process Domain x Remember Understand Apply Analyze Evaluate Create
  • 16. Guidelines/ Components
    • Use action verbs in the level of
    • U-A-A-E-C
    • Cover Mezirow’s critical reflection approach – What, how and why type question
    • Provide opportunity for contextualize, theorize, personalize, and generalize
  • 17. Exercise
    • Develop at least 2 reflective activities in a topic of your choice.