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Reflective teaching

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Reflective teaching

  1. 1. Reflective Teaching: What is the image left in the classroom? Jane Harding da Rosa Teacher Trainer International House Porto “ The English Classroom Revisited” 23rd APPI Conference
  2. 2. <ul><li>‘ Critical reflection can trigger a deeper understanding of teaching’ </li></ul><ul><li>‘ if teachers are actively involved in reflecting on what is happening in their own classrooms, they are in a position to discover whether there is a gap between what they teach and what their learners learn .’ </li></ul><ul><li>Richards and Lockhart 1996:4 </li></ul>
  3. 3. <ul><li>Background information </li></ul><ul><li>Teacher training at IH Porto </li></ul><ul><li>IHCYL and the Children’s Home </li></ul><ul><li>The Teaching Workshops (relfective course) </li></ul><ul><li>Preparing for 12-15 trainees to observe a class </li></ul>
  4. 4. <ul><li>“ The English Classroom Revisited” </li></ul><ul><li>23rd APPI conference </li></ul>Reflective Teaching: What is the image left in the classroom?
  5. 5. <ul><li>25/01/09 </li></ul><ul><li>Nothing from my lesson plan was accomplished!! We were in a different room which was much bigger. Emma and I decided to have the two groups together for 10 mins to explain to them what would happen next week when 12 teachers come to watch. </li></ul><ul><li>Once the lesson started the girls were VERY excited and noisy even though there was only 4 of them! </li></ul>
  6. 6. <ul><li>When you leave a classroom it’s natural to focus on the negative things that have happened. </li></ul><ul><li>Why? </li></ul><ul><li>Because that’s what has the greatest impact on our lives. </li></ul><ul><li>That’s why it’s important to reflect </li></ul>
  7. 7. <ul><li>Task 1 </li></ul>Think about a lesson you taught recently (it’s more effective if you choose an unsuccessful lesson) Make notes: focus on the what rather than why What class was it? (what age? / what level?) What happened? Share with a partner
  8. 8. <ul><li>Lesson summary </li></ul><ul><li>classroom verbs/ actions TPR </li></ul><ul><li>English RAP </li></ul><ul><li>Da da da (can I borrow) sts asked for each item </li></ul><ul><li>TPR c’room objects and prepositions (the ruler is on the chair) </li></ul><ul><li>Revision of school rooms +TPR with pencil </li></ul><ul><li>‘ What’s missing’ </li></ul><ul><li>The dice game (learner training-copying into notebook) </li></ul><ul><li>Tidy up </li></ul><ul><li>Uno </li></ul>
  9. 9. <ul><li>‘ You cannot change what you don’t acknowledge ’ </li></ul><ul><li>Dr Phil </li></ul>
  10. 10. <ul><li>Task 2 </li></ul>Stage 1: recall the lesson /activities. Stage 2 : identify how much of what was accomplished was planned. Stage 3: look for the positive aspects of the lesson Stage 4: look for the reason WHY it feels unsuccessful
  11. 11. <ul><li>“ I've come to the frightening conclusion that I am the decisive element in the classroom. It's my personal approach that creates the climate, it's my daily mood that makes the weather. As a teacher, I possess a tremendous power to make a child's life miserable or joyous. I can be a tool of torture, or an instrument of inspiration. I can humiliate or humour, hurt or heal. In all situations, it's my response that decides whether a crisis will be escalated or de-escalated and a child humanised or de-humanised ” </li></ul><ul><li>(Haim Ginott, The Learner's Dimension) http://www.didacticsworld.com/oct07/feature/ </li></ul>
  12. 12. <ul><li>Reflection! </li></ul><ul><li>Looking back at the lesson now, even though the students were noisy and distracted they actually got quite a lot out of it. There was a lot of language produced. </li></ul><ul><li>The main problem was a lack of routines / rules / class expectations. </li></ul><ul><li>I’ve just realised that they have had 17 different teachers in 6 different rooms in 6 months! </li></ul>
  13. 13. <ul><li>Projecting Forward! </li></ul><ul><li>Line up with a question to get in </li></ul><ul><li>Tell the students where to sit </li></ul><ul><li>Have a definite front to the classroom where my things are and access them quickly and easily </li></ul><ul><li>Turn the disadvantages into advantages </li></ul><ul><li>Prepare every minute </li></ul><ul><li>Have a back up plan! </li></ul>
  14. 14. <ul><li>Task 3 </li></ul>Reflect and Project! ‘ You cannot change what you don’t acknowledge ’ Dr Phil
  15. 15. <ul><li>‘ Critical reflection can trigger a deeper understanding of teaching’ </li></ul><ul><li>‘ If teachers are actively involved in reflecting on what is happening in their own classrooms, they are in a position to discover whether there is a gap between what they teach and what their learners learn .’ </li></ul><ul><li>Richards and Lockhart 1996:4 </li></ul>
  16. 16. <ul><li>Projecting Forward! </li></ul><ul><li>Line up with a question to get in </li></ul><ul><li>Tell sts where to sit </li></ul><ul><li>Have a definite front where my things are and access them quickly and easily </li></ul><ul><li>Turn the disadvantages into advantages </li></ul><ul><li>Prepare every minute </li></ul><ul><li>Have a back up plan! </li></ul><ul><li>Make an audio recording of the next lesson </li></ul>
  17. 17. <ul><li>‘ Me and My MP3 ’ </li></ul>Stage 1: recall the lesson /activities. I’d forgotten several activities Stage 2 : identify how much of what was accomplished was planned. I had the evidence! Stage 3: look for the positive aspects of the lesson I could hear the sts speaking in English Stage 4: look for the reason WHY it feels unsuccessful I could listen carefully to my classroom language.
  18. 18. <ul><li>Task 4 </li></ul>What are benefits of recording and listening to a lesson? Discuss in small groups
  19. 19. <ul><li>‘ Some MP3 benefits ’ </li></ul><ul><li>T1 drilled the language for the students </li></ul><ul><li>T1 was focused on the activity so much she was unaware that the students produced very little language </li></ul><ul><li>T3 noticed vast difference in type of noise produced (fidgeting energy V’s vocal noise) </li></ul><ul><li>T2 noticed her own classroom language / instructions </li></ul><ul><li>T3 noticed when her students spoke in English </li></ul><ul><li>T2 commented on how boring and long some of the activities were </li></ul><ul><li>T1 commented on how her planning had improved, especially with regards to timing </li></ul>
  20. 20. <ul><li>‘ Experience is insufficient </li></ul><ul><li>as a basis for development’ </li></ul><ul><li>Richards and Lockhart 1996:4 </li></ul><ul><li>‘ Many classroom routines and strategies are applied almost automatically and do not involve a great deal of conscious thought or reflection’ </li></ul><ul><li>Parker in Richards and Lockhart 1996:4 </li></ul>
  21. 21. <ul><li>‘ Teaching never causes learning, but rather creates (or fails to create) the conditions in which learning can occur ’ </li></ul><ul><li>van Lier 1988:22 </li></ul>
  22. 22. Reflective Teaching: What is the image left in the classroom? Jane Harding da Rosa Teacher Trainer International House Porto [email_address]

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