#jiscdiglitDeveloping Digital Skills andTraining to Boost EmploymentPaul Bailey, Learning and TeachingProgramme, Joint Inf...
What does the term                                          “Digital Literacy” mean to you? Student                       ...
A definition of digital literacy?          We’re working with colleges       and universities to embed core      digital s...
Employable Graduates are Digitally Literate       Around 90% of all new graduate jobs require a high level of digital skil...
Developing skills for employmentThe main driver for developing digitalliteracy for arts graduates isemployability.   Arts ...
Digital Literacies in the Subject Discipline “A digitally literate person in the Faculty of Humanities and Social Science ...
Digital Literacies of Staff “The Digital Department focus is on teaching assistants and recognises  their importance as a ...
Developing Digital Literacies ProgrammeA programme across UKUniversities and Collegespromoting the developmentof coherent,...
Working with Professional AssociationsThe sector bodies and professional    Organisational Developmentassociations JISC i...
Staff training Students training Staff
Developing Digital LiteraciesDeveloping        Employabilitystudents’         anddigital           graduatecapabilities   ...
#jiscdiglitDeveloping Digital LiteraciesKeeping Informed Getting Involved
Developing Digital Literacies - http://bit.ly/ddl-prog JISC on Air online radio programmes    – Part 1 - Digital Literacy...
Developing Digital Literacies                                                  briefing paper Developing Digital Literaci...
Further information and resources Programme blog - http://elearningprogs.jiscinvolve.org Digital Literacies Webinars - h...
Innovating e-Learning 2012The 7th JISC international onlineconference takes place on 13th – 23rdNovember 2012Registration ...
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Developing Digital Skills and Training to Boost Employment

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  • Mark Kerrigan, University if Greenwich from responses from 79 staff and 223 students, “These graphical representations of both staff and students indicate an interesting perception of whatdigital literacies are. There was a strong indicator of ‘ability’ and ‘understanding’ with commentsaround ‘learning’ and ‘knowledge’ A lot of the responses refer to being able to use a technology, i.e.buttons to press and thus combined indicate areas of work for the project i.e. to develop and culture abetter intuitional understanding of DL.”
  •  “So we want to be able to say University of Greenwich will support you in reaching whatever you wish to be, and one way of doing this is making sure you are equipped to function digitally in the outside world.” Mark Kerrigan, University of Greenwich, JISC on AirMany learners enter further and higher education lacking the skills needed to apply digital technologies to education. As 90% of new jobs will require excellent digital skills, improving digital literacy is an essential component of developing employable graduates.Universities and Colleges recognise that Digital literacies are required for graduates to be employable. At Greenwich, digital literacies are being incorporated into the curriculum, they are involving students and employers to help them achieve this across all course. The University of Reading are also using work placements, skills assessment tools to ensure graduates develop the necessary employability skills.
  • The University of Bath recognizes that digitally literacies can be specific to the subject discipline and are looking at faculty specific digital literacy frameworks to define the DL attributes of learners/graduates in a subject context. Digital literacies are also changing what it means to be a researcher, it is becoming increasingly difficult to learn or research effectively without digital skills in a modern university or college The implications and challenges for Universities and Colleges are two fold, 1. They need to ensure their students/graduates develop digital literacies to be employable2. That their own staff academic, research, library, administration are also developing digital literacy skills to be able to function within the digital university, and to support the development of digital literacies of their own students.
  • The University of Bath recognizes that digitally literacies can be specific to the subject discipline and are looking at faculty specific digital literacy frameworks to define the DL attributes of learners/graduates in a subject context. Digital literacies are also changing what it means to be a researcher, it is becoming increasingly difficult to learn or research effectively without digital skills in a modern university or college The Digital Department focus is on teaching assistants and recognises theirimportance as a staff group to supporting the development of the digital environment in departments but also contributing to the digital literacies of other academic and support staff and studentsAlison Gilry, The Digital Department project, University College LondonThe implications and challenges for Universities and Colleges are two fold, 1. They need to ensure their students/graduates develop digital literacies to be employable2. That their own staff academic, research, library, administration are also developing digital literacy skills to be able to function within the digital university, and to support the development of digital literacies of their own students.
  • The University of Bath recognizes that digitally literacies can be specific to the subject discipline and are looking at faculty specific digital literacy frameworks to define the DL attributes of learners/graduates in a subject context. Digital literacies are also changing what it means to be a researcher, it is becoming increasingly difficult to learn or research effectively without digital skills in a modern university or college The implications and challenges for Universities and Colleges are two fold, 1. They need to ensure their students/graduates develop digital literacies to be employable2. That their own staff academic, research, library, administration are also developing digital literacy skills to be able to function within the digital university, and to support the development of digital literacies of their own students.
  • The JISC are working with 12 institutions covering a wide spectrum of staff roles (academic, library, admin, researcher, etc.) and students from college students through to post graduates, to promote the development of strategic organisation approaches to developing digital literacies. The institutions are looking at several aspects ranging from employability and graduate attributes to learning and information skills. They are also looking at the technical and infrastructure issues such as use of personal devices, implications for wireless networks, a the BYO culture.
  • To support embedding of digital literacies we are also working with sector bodies and professional associations, through their member networks to promote and facilitate change. Informing the development of recognition frameworks for staff in higher and further education, through the associations own professional frameworks such as the AUA CPD Framework , SCONUL 7 pillars model which now has a DL lens, also producing guidelines on the UK Professional Standards Framework. A national qualification is also been developed for FE through OCN.
  • Although students are coming with increasing digital skills and competencies, they still require guidance in developing learning related and academic digital practices. Some students may be arriving with good social digital skills (facebook, twitter, smart phone, etc) but they may not be familiar with the tools and digital practices required for academic learning whether using a referencing tool or effectively researching information. Excellent learners used to be those who read beyond the core texts, they are now also those who both reference and use additional materials.Student expectations of staff digital skills are high, the reality is more varied. Staff expect students to have digital skills where in many case they don’t or are unable to apply them to learning activities. Employers report similar experiences with graduates in the work place. Students’ with digital literacies are being offered the opportunity to both support and influence the institutional approaches to developing digital literacies.At Oxford Brookes University student pioneers are being used, working with in partnership with staff, to develop resources, mentor and support staff – the benefits are mutual, learning from each other, a net gain for the institution. The students are offered recognition and reward through a scheme recognized by the Institute for Leadership and Management and can gain academic credit.We’re just about to start some work with the NUS, QAA, and others around supporting and recognition for students working as change agents and e-pioneers across our projects.
  • Developing Digital Skills and Training to Boost Employment

    1. 1. #jiscdiglitDeveloping Digital Skills andTraining to Boost EmploymentPaul Bailey, Learning and TeachingProgramme, Joint Information Systems Committee(JISC)
    2. 2. What does the term “Digital Literacy” mean to you? Student Academic StaffFrom Mark Kerrigan, University of Greenwich, Baseline Survey 2012
    3. 3. A definition of digital literacy? We’re working with colleges and universities to embed core digital skills into the curriculum. By digital literacy we mean those capabilities which fit an individual for living, learning and working in a digital society: for example, the skills to use digital tools to undertake academic research, writing and critical thinking; as part of personal development planning; and as a way of showcasing achievements.
    4. 4. Employable Graduates are Digitally Literate Around 90% of all new graduate jobs require a high level of digital skills Race Online 2012: www.raceonline2012.org/stories/jobcentre-plus “…unless people are digitally literate... they are going to struggle to function in a modern society and a modern workplace”. Dr Andrew Eynon, PADDLE Project, Coleg Llandrillo “So we want to be able to say University of Greenwich will support you in reaching whatever you wish to be, and one way of doing this is making sure you are equipped to function digitally in the outside world.” Mark Kerrigan, University of Greenwich, speaking in the JISC on Air Radio podcastFrom Hague, C. & Payton, S. (2010) Digital Literacy Across the Curriculum. Bristol: Futurelabhttp://futurelab.org.uk/resources/digital-literacy-across-curriculum-handbook
    5. 5. Developing skills for employmentThe main driver for developing digitalliteracy for arts graduates isemployability. Arts and designstudents are going into an industry inwhich they need to build themselvesas a brand so they need the digitalcapabilities that go along with thatsuch as creating websites, usingsocial media for professional gain andnetworking, developing an onlineportfolio and managing an identity inthe digital ageLindsay Jordan, DIALproject, University of the Arts.
    6. 6. Digital Literacies in the Subject Discipline “A digitally literate person in the Faculty of Humanities and Social Science is criticallyand ethically aware, confident in engaging in a wide array of digital practices, resources/tools and academic and professional environments, and establishing coherent identities”PRiDE project, University of Bath “The use of digital technologies and media by researchers potentially is changing what it means to be an effective researcher or skilled academic/professional in higher education” John Igoe, Developing Digital Literacies Baseline Report, Vitae.
    7. 7. Digital Literacies of Staff “The Digital Department focus is on teaching assistants and recognises their importance as a staff group to supporting the development of the digital environment in departments but also contributing to the digital literacies of other academic and support staff and students”Alison Gilry, The Digital Department project, University College London
    8. 8. Developing Digital Literacies ProgrammeA programme across UKUniversities and Collegespromoting the developmentof coherent, inclusive andholistic institutionalstrategies andorganisational approachesfor developing digitalliteracies for staff andstudents in UK further andhigher education.
    9. 9. Working with Professional AssociationsThe sector bodies and professional  Organisational Developmentassociations JISC is working with in Higher Education Groupinitially include: (ODHE)  Standing Conference on Association for Learning Academic Practice (SCAP) Development in Higher  Staff Development Forum Education (ALDinHE) (SDF) Association for Learning  Staff and Educational Technology (ALT) Development Association Association of University (SEDA) Administrators (AUA)  Society of College, National Heads of Educational and University Libraries Development Group (HEDG) (SCONUL)  Vitae
    10. 10. Staff training Students training Staff
    11. 11. Developing Digital LiteraciesDeveloping Employabilitystudents’ anddigital graduatecapabilities attributesDeveloping Digital literacydigital in subjectprofessional disciplinesexpertise of all staff
    12. 12. #jiscdiglitDeveloping Digital LiteraciesKeeping Informed Getting Involved
    13. 13. Developing Digital Literacies - http://bit.ly/ddl-prog JISC on Air online radio programmes – Part 1 - Digital Literacy – delivering the agenda within colleges and universities – Part 2 - Developing digital literacies for working in a digital world – Available from: www.jisc.ac.uk/jisconair Developing Digital Literacies webinar series 2012-13 Summary of the projects baseline reports. Available online: http://bit.ly/JiUV0m Summary of the professional association baseline reports. Available online: http://bit.ly/KWFJUo Institutional videos from the Developing Digital Literacies projects visit http://bit.ly/jiscdlprogvideos to hear about how they are implementing digital literacies at a strategic level
    14. 14. Developing Digital Literacies briefing paper Developing Digital Literacies Briefing paper available in June 2012, from http://bit.ly/ddl-prog and available to order from publications@jisc.ac.uk Provides a summary of the context and . emerging outcomes of the programme together with links to relevant resources. Author Sarah Payton, Freelance Education Researcher and Facilitator“Digital literacy is the intersection betweendigital knowhow and academic practice. Or, ifyou want to frame it differently, the ability tolearn, the ability to learn well.”Helen Beetham, Synthesis consultant 12/06/2012 | Slide 14
    15. 15. Further information and resources Programme blog - http://elearningprogs.jiscinvolve.org Digital Literacies Webinars - http://bit.ly/HKbYoy Join JISC-DIGLIT-PUBLIC@jiscmail.ac.uk Follow #jiscdiglit Come and speak to us – the programme will be represented at the Blended Learning Conference, HE Academy Conference, Greenwich e-Learning Conference, ALT-C with proposals submitted to SEDA Annual conference ( to add)
    16. 16. Innovating e-Learning 2012The 7th JISC international onlineconference takes place on 13th – 23rdNovember 2012Registration details announced shortly!#jiscel12www.jisc.ac.uk/elpconference12Digital literacies will be a key theme of theconference and opportunities to share yourwork in the conference activity weekI just want to say #jiscel11 was awesome...
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