Developing our digital literacies: the imperative

1,171 views

Published on

Session for Changing the Learning Landscape event, 29 May 2013
http://www.heacademy.ac.uk/events/detail/2013/29_May_CLL_Aston

Published in: Education
1 Comment
4 Likes
Statistics
Notes
No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,171
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
325
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
1
Likes
4
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • LOGIN to WIKIhttp://www.heacademy.ac.uk/events/detail/2013/29_May_CLL_Aston
  • This is just access to tech for entertainmentNot for our purposes because not academically relevant skillshttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RoVNBfPEQu8
  • http://legoscratch.wordpress.com/2013/02/20/chapter-3/11 year old boys’ blogComposed on ipod touch withimovie, youtube and wordpress appsIs he digitally literate?Is using technology in purposeful way?But this is just media literacy surely? Not doing anything different, just posting it online
  • Are they digitally literate?Getting closerUsing tech to do things differentlyAnd talking and sharing in order to improve their practice. using their own tech, in their own personal ways, no one right way of doing it
  • This is important, it is a holistic view(anyone who remembers the JISC learner experience studies (2004-2009) will remember how important that holistic view is. That is, DL is broader than IT, media or information literacy (terms that have been around a while), and indeed subsumes these terms. EshaAlkalai (2004) described DL as ‘a survival skill in a digital era’. It’s about the era we live in and the choices we have. For example, an important part of DL is knowing when to use a non-digital source or tool.So I’m not going to talk about lists of competencies and the such, although I have got some examples of these photocopied for you to help with this afternoon’s activity to build a professional development framework for our community of staff and educational developers.
  • If you are interested in the term ‘literacy’ I’d refer you to this book, and ch. 11 particularly.
  • This notion of the agile adopter stems from work conducted by Jane Seale and others as part of the LEXDIS project who talked about the importance of ‘digital agility’ of disabled learners. They were characterised by Being extremely familiar with technologyUsing a wide range of strategiesHaving high levels of confidence in their own ability to use technologySo, do we know any digitally agile students?
  • https://wiki.brookes.ac.uk/display/instepp/Google+TubesThese are a couple of epioneersfrom the JISC INstePP project based at Brookeswhich is justcomingtoan end in July. For me, this is getting even closer towhat I think of as digitallyliterate.For me digital literacy is aboutcreativeappropriation, agile adoption, digital agility…. whateveryou want to call it.
  • https://wiki.brookes.ac.uk/display/instepp/Google+TubesThese are a couple of epioneersfrom the JISC INstePP project based at Brookeswhich is justcomingtoan end in July. For me, this is getting even closer towhat I think of as digitallyliterate.For me digital literacy is aboutcreativeappropriation, agile adoption, digital agility…. whateveryou want to call it.
  • In other words, in a multiplicity of ways some of the existing ePioneers exemplify the Oxford Brookes digital and information literacy graduate attribute, being ‘confident, agile adopter(s) of a range of technologies for personal, academic and professional use’. It is this confidence and agility, rather than specific knowledge of software or devices, that is of greatest value to the project and to developing the digital literacies of others. The ePioneers suggested that as far as possible supplementary ePioneer training on how to use various digital tools should be made available online so that ePioneers can ‘do all the training in their own time and then in their e-portfolio tick off the training when it's done’ (ePioneer 1, 14 Sep 2012).
  • Now we are getting into territory where we know a lot less about what’s going on..I’m not drawing any distinction here between staff and students. I’m just going to start talking about ‘people’.
  • I showed you this model earlier, and Liz Bennet is going to say some more about it so I won’t go into any detail the important thing to note is that it is about moving on from AccessSkillsPractices identityThe bit of this I want us to think about today
  • We said DL was a socially and culturally situated practice …Such practices are typically personal and flexible and developed in response to situational need. Does this mean that rather than teaching people to use technology, we should be encouraging them to develop their own ways of using technology to meet a particular need they have?Well yes. This suggests that in order to move people beyond Skills (I CAN), we should be thinking more about the triggers that encourage the development of practices (I DO). I’m going to suggest 3 ways of thinking about how to support PEOPLE (including ourselves here today) to develop digital literacy:Using technology to met a particular needEncouraging informal learningContextualising your definitions/objectivesThen hopefully you can use these 3 principles when you come to developing a framework for us this afternoon, after you’ve heard from a whole heap more examples.
  • We said DL was a socially and culturally situated practice …Such practices are typically personal and flexible and developed in response to situational need. Does this mean that rather than teaching people to use technology, we should be encouraging them to develop their own ways of using technology to meet a particular need they have?Well yes. This suggests that in order to move people beyond Skills (I CAN), we should be thinking more about the triggers that encourage the development of practices (I DO). So, knowing this, how can we support PEOPLE (including ourselves here today) to develop digital literacy? I suggest.Using technology to met a particular needEncouraging informal learningContextualising your definitions/objectivesThen hopefully you can use these 3 principles when you come to developing a framework for us this afternoon, after you’ve heard from a whole heap more examples.
  • Here’s a good example…Reference Me, developed by students in response to a need, shared informally.
  • Let’s think of something more relevant to supporting practitioners like… Learning Design.If we know that practices are developed in response to need so choosing your trigger is going to be important if you want practices to applied in certain contexts. So, triggers for developing staff digital literacies might be:‘using digital technology to design and develop study programmes and modules using learning design tools (as in the OU definition and staff development framework)There is a problem with digital literacy being a socially situated practice, and being so context specific, and that is that it seems that transferring capabilities developed in one context to another is more problematic than we thought. So important to develop the practice in the context you want it to be used.
  • If we know that digital literacy is developed through informal learning, might be important to provide ways of sharing and networking our use of technology e.g.The LAMS community created six years ago is still active and is fundamentally different from other online repositories that might superficially look similarWithin the LAMS Community the focus has been on creating a community space in which barriers to exploiting Learning Designs are removed and sharing amongst teachers is fostered. James finds that teachers value advice on versioning generic templates for their discipline and the opportunity to share designs within a closed community of close colleaguesthe sharing and reuse of Learning Designs could be facilitated by supporting teachers to combine generic designs with methods and content that meet the needs of their specific discipline communities.
  • I’m not drawing any distinction here between staff and students.
  • All agree? Are these statements enough?Probably not, in fact the 2012 European Commission report on expert’s view of digital competence, starts from the premise that educators require more clarity from such definitions.
  • I’m not drawing any distinction here between staff and students.
  • Developing our digital literacies: the imperative

    1. 1. Developing our digital literacies:the imperativeDr. Rhona SharpeOxford Centre for Staff and Learning DevelopmentChanging the Learning Landscape, 29 May 2013
    2. 2. 1. What is digital literacy?2. How do people develop their digitalliteracies?3. What does it mean to be a digitallyliterate staff and educational developer?4. Why should we care?
    3. 3. Is she digitally literate?
    4. 4. Is he digitally literate?
    5. 5. Definitions: literacy“The use of the term literacy implies abroader form of education about media thatis not restricted to mechanical skills ornarrow forms of functional competence. Itsuggests a more rounded, humanisticconception’(Buckingham, 2007)
    6. 6. ‘Literacy’ impliessocially and culturallysituated practices,often highly dependenton the context in whichthey are carried out.Beetham & Oliver (2010)
    7. 7. The functional access, skills and practicesnecessary to become a confident, agileadopter of a range of technologies forpersonal, academic and professional usehttps://wiki.brookes.ac.uk/display/slidacases/Oxford+BrookesAt Oxford BrookesUniversity, digital andinformation literacy isdefined as ..
    8. 8. I’m not afraid to useit … I guess that’sthe difference. I’mnot afraid to just goexplore it
    9. 9. Confident, agile adoptersThe staff are asking us to do things like, "how do weintegrate Twitter with this?" and, okay, I dont know,gimme five minutes and Ill go and find out. And thatshow Ive always worked.… I will go away and makemyself an expert in that field and then come back andpass on that knowledge, enable other people to go anduse that software(InstePP ePioneer 2, JISC cluster group Sep2012).
    10. 10. 1. What is digital literacy?2. How do people develop their digitalliteracies?3. What does it mean to be a digitallyliterate staff and educational developer?4. Why should we care?
    11. 11. dlf.brookesblogs.net
    12. 12. Socially and culturally situated practicesare often highly dependent on context
    13. 13. Socially and culturally situated practicesare often highly dependent on context• Personalised uses of technology,• developed through interactionswith others,• in response to some need.Littlejohn, Beetham & McGill (forthcoming)
    14. 14. Encouragepersonalised uses oftechnology…e.g. OU LearningDesign Toolswww.open.ac.uk/blogs/OULDI/
    15. 15. Provide ways ofsharing andnetworking …e.g.lamscommunity.orgDalziel (20130
    16. 16. Contextualisingsupport for thedisciplinese.g. mapping thegraduate attributes
    17. 17. What does it mean to be digitally literate in . . .?Use online databases toconduct systematic reviews.Analyse data in Excel toproduce scientific reports.Maintain electronic patientcare records appropriately.Evaluate the role of assistivetechnologies in advancinghealth and social care practice.Health and lifesciences
    18. 18. What does it mean to be digitally literate in . . .?Use relevant software to solvecomplex automotiveengineering problems.Work with models thatsimulate the behaviour of thephysical world.Produce high quality outputusing the latest software tools.Technology andengineering
    19. 19. 1. What is digital literacy?2. How do people develop their digitalliteracies?3. What does it mean to be a digitallyliterate staff and educational developer?4. Why should we care?
    20. 20. Ferrari, A. (2012) Digital competence in practice: ananalysis of frameworks. JRC Technical Report. EU.
    21. 21. Contextualising digital literacy forour own discipline: some ideas• Facilitation of onlinecommunities
    22. 22. Contextualising digital literacy forour own discipline: some ideas• Facilitation of onlinecommunities• Working in an openacademic environmentRoberts, G. (2013)
    23. 23. Contextualising digital literacy forour own discipline: some ideas• Facilitation of onlinecommunities• Working in an openacademic environment• Productive use oflearning design toolsConole, G. (2013)
    24. 24. Contextualising digital literacy forour own discipline: some ideas• Facilitation of onlinecommunities• Working in an openacademic environment• Productive use oflearning design tools• Digital scholarship
    25. 25. 1. What is digital literacy?2. How do people develop their digitalliteracies?3. What does it mean to be a digitallyliterate staff and educational developer?4. Why should we care?
    26. 26. Why should we care?• People who will thrive in the digital age willneed the confidence and agility to respond tocomplex and changing circumstance.
    27. 27. Why should we care?• People who will thrive in the digital age willneed the confidence and agility to respond tocomplex and changing circumstance.• The powerful influence of context means thatwe, the teachers, should take the lead indeveloping our learners and ourselves.
    28. 28. Why should we care?• People who will thrive in the digital age will needthe confidence and agility to respond tocomplex and changing circumstance.• The powerful influence of context means thatwe, the teachers, should take the lead indeveloping our learners and ourselves.• With our expertise in learner development,should be at the forefront of providingopportunities for people to develop and sharetheir personal practices for using technology.
    29. 29. ReferencesBeetham, H. & Oliver, M. (2010) The changing practices of knowledge andlearning, in R. Sharpe, H. Beetham & S. de Freitas, Rethinking Learningfor a Digital Age, Routledge. London & New York.Benfield, G. (2012) InstePP Evaluation report. Oxford Brookes Unversity.Oxford.Buckingham, D. (2007) Beyond Technology: Children’s learning in the age ofdigital media. Polity Press. Cambridge.Conole, G. (2013) Tools and resources to guide practice in H.Beetham &R.Sharpe (eds) Rethinking Pedagogy for a Digital Age. 2nd Ed. Routledge.London and New York.Dalziel, J. (2013) The LAMS Community: Building communities of designers,in H.Beetham & R.Sharpe (eds) Rethinking Pedagogy for a Digital Age.2nd Ed. Routledge. London and New York.Littlejohn, A., Beetham, H. & McGill, L. (forthcoming) Learning at the digitalfrontier: a review of digital literacies in theory and practice. Journal ofComputer Assisted Learning.Roberts, G. (2013) OOCs for the rest of us. Presentation to ELESIGSymposium, March 2013. Available at elesig.netWeller, M. (2011) The digital scholar: how technology is transformingscholarly practice. Bloomsbury. London.

    ×