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A summary and reflections of the College Lecturer Survey undertaken in 2011 by LSIS. Reveals the rise of the Digital Practitioner, that is the Digital Native, now practising in the classroom with the …

A summary and reflections of the College Lecturer Survey undertaken in 2011 by LSIS. Reveals the rise of the Digital Practitioner, that is the Digital Native, now practising in the classroom with the confidence to use technology as and when needed based on their professional expertise. "it's the people, stupid"

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  • The world must have moved on in the 11 years of e-learning in FE. Can we use the same models of training? Were we capturing the right profile by focusing on process rather than behaviour. We felt we needed to look at technology in action rather than technology as a process. Technology in everyday life appears all consuming. We are all now digitally indigenous. We also recognised the increasing focus on reflective learning and the availability of personal technology (technology for the one not just technology for the many). It's not only defining impact, but re-discovering it by finding what motivates a narrative response and letting us see that previous surveys had failed to capture the transformation. The digitally indigenous Technology in action Impact is a function of confidence not process skills
  • The world must have moved on in the 11 years of e-learning in FE. Can we use the same models of training? Were we capturing the right profile by focusing on process rather than behaviour. We felt we needed to look at technology in action rather than technology as a process. Technology in everyday life appears all consuming. We are all now digitally indigenous. We also recognised the increasing focus on reflective learning and the availability of personal technology (technology for the one not just technology for the many). It's not only defining impact, but re-discovering it by finding what motivates a narrative response and letting us see that previous surveys had failed to capture the transformation. The digitally indigenous Technology in action Impact is a function of confidence not process skills
  • Respondents are given a range of reactive responses to common technology processes which are not mutually exclusive. Respondents nuts respond with how they feel rather than what they know. The Matrix and the analysis. Going for the emotive response but on the hypothesis of confidence and capability. Respondents are then invited to explain their choice to themselves and us. Confidence and capability = Capacity, which when aggregated gives an organisational signature. We wanted to capture the affordances of the technology. Capacity at the institution is an aggregation of it.  We have another of factors that have come together to give us this rich data. A great example of a mixed model of surveying. What adds to this is to take the data head on The use of Survey Monkey's limitations to arrive at a serendipitous survey structure that encouraged narrative responses. We might need to explain what happened to the other 147,000 words!
  • These are the findings which are really robust. Profiles are similar and the questions are answered consistently. There is a striking acceptance that technology is to be explored rather than be directed to. Assistance is required in purposeful application rather than direction in using discrete software. What we have is an overwhelming desire to explain the use of technology rather than simply ticking boxes. 93,000 free response words. Drawn from 16 providers, 240,000 narrative words that tell over 700 unique stories. The free response is a revelation in its own right. Nigel: And experimenters! who work in a strong ethical framework. Nigel: Including the development of wider communities for learning and sharing practice and Nigel: A significant minority with HE teaching through partners operate with more than one learning platform - usually Blackboard.
  • We think impact has been radically mis-defined. We believe impact is a function of how quickly the ‘shock of the new’ is explored and subsumed into teaching. It includes the degree of turbulence caused by confronting new technologies. Confidence is critical factor in applying technology that when added to understanding defines capability that leads to the development of very rich interlinked uses of technology.
  • The use of tech in FE has been transformative and in ways that just weren't captured by traditional survey methods.That allowing free text responses has demonstrated a remarkably consistency in which technology is seen by practitioners. It is reflected in institutional policy. Like most transformation, it has been subterranean and beneath the radar.The impact is a richness of the approach and we could explore with learners the richness of the learner experience in terms of the experience of the technology and its potential is the mash up for staff. By creating the conditions for practitioners to produce their narratives educational purpose?
  • The world must have moved on in the 11 years of e-learning in FE. Can we use the same models of training? Were we capturing the right profile by focusing on process rather than behaviour. We felt we needed to look at technology in action rather than technology as a process. Technology in everyday life appears all consuming. We are all now digitally indigenous. We also recognised the increasing focus on reflective learning and the availability of personal technology (technology for the one not just technology for the many). It's not only defining impact, but re-discovering it by finding what motivates a narrative response and letting us see that previous surveys had failed to capture the transformation. The digitally indigenous Technology in action Impact is a function of confidence not process skills
  • The skills and knowledge demonstrated by our sample has not emerged from systematic use of technology following training, but the insightful use of technology to solve particular problems emerging in the interaction with learners and sometimes colleagues. This understanding is supplemented by their experiences as users of technology in their personal lives as much as by training. We think achieve this through insight but would not consider it learning because it is undertaken in private, away from college. in private. How fast is the assimilation between what we do in social gaming space and what we do in teaching. Interesting how many technologies that were important are now not mentioned. Word processing, email and spreadsheets are no longer mentioned as they are (for our representative sample) bar a few, these are taken as hidden.  The tipping point of technologies
  • Bound by a the values of effective teaching. (description) Boundaries of individual software are not discussed and there is little reliance on single technology use. Rather there is a fragmenting into highly personalised experiences and applications of technology, woven into a tapestry of application. What holds it together is values of teaching and learning. The narratives constantly imply these values and thus prevent chaos. This defines the ethics of their profession. This is utterly consistent with ‘do no harm’ and encourage the ownership of the understanding of technology amongst learners. The enquiring mind is a reflective learner. A reflective learner is able to manage their own learning journey. Managing one’s own learning supports personal accountability for it. REfLECT allows its presentation. Training of IT needs to change to a more individualised approach to satisfy the enquiring approach. Process learning is a poor strategy for embedding good use of technology. This is still done. The teacher is no longer a vessel to be filled with technical knowledge. Embedding technology as a process can only be managed by the individual teacher. The institution is not a gate keeper to this nor can it suggest that all teachers use bespoke software in a given way. Context of learning is all. Trust and facilitation not control and compliance.
  • What we believe is that teachers now have the tools and approach to make the most of this new approach. The question is do the institutions have the capacity to recognise this and make it happen? This ties to our idea of combining COPD and SD. Critically the teacher manages it and accounts for themselves.  The ideas of meta skills arose from work completed during secondment to BECTA
  • The use of tech in FE has been transformative and in ways that just weren't captured by traditional survey methods.That allowing free text responses has demonstrated a remarkably consistency in which technology is seen by practitioners. It is reflected in institutional policy. Like most transformation, it has been subterranean and beneath the radar.The impact is a richness of the approach and we could explore with learners the richness of the learner experience in terms of the experience of the technology and its potential is the mash up for staff. By creating the conditions for practitioners to produce their narratives educational purpose?
  • The use of tech in FE has been transformative and in ways that just weren't captured by traditional survey methods.That allowing free text responses has demonstrated a remarkably consistency in which technology is seen by practitioners. It is reflected in institutional policy. Like most transformation, it has been subterranean and beneath the radar.The impact is a richness of the approach and we could explore with learners the richness of the learner experience in terms of the experience of the technology and its potential is the mash up for staff. By creating the conditions for practitioners to produce their narratives educational purpose?

Transcript

  • 1. The Digital Practitioner: when Digital Natives grow up reflections on the LSIS survey on “technology in action”
    • Nigel Ecclesfield LSIS & Geoff Rebbeck IfL
  • 2. The context of our Enquiry Now we are 11….. Background; What has changed in 11 years of College elearning & edtech Can we find new ways to describe Impact? What should staff development look like in a digital learning world? Survey; Staff Attitudes to learning technology in action 2011 (LSIS Survey) Conclusions; The rise of the reflective practitioner The emergence of the Web 2.0 practitioner Applying Learning Analytics to reflective CPD
  • 3. The context of our Enquiry Now we are 11….. What has changed in 11 years of College research How can we describe Impact? What should staff development look like The rise of the reflective practitioner The emergence of the Web 2.0 practitioner Digital Native confidence used professionally
  • 4. Combining Staff Development Learning Analytics & Reflection
  • 5. The LSIS Survey structure
    • The Matrix (see resources)
    • Looking at technology in action
    • Emotive responses led to free open reflections
    • 700 stories, stories for which learning and teaching in the daily experience of practitioners is the primary focus and stimulus. 240,000 words of which 93,000 is free response
    http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/thanet-lsis-survey
  • 6. LSIS Survey Findings
    • Over 90% of tutors see Moodle as normal practice
    • Teachers are natural explorers rather than being passive in receiving guidance by others
    • They describe responses in terms of teaching and learning rather than the virtue of the technologies themselves
    • The challenge of fitting the familiar social software to the particular learning application
    • The possibility of personal learning space to support this evolution of professional practice
  • 7. Mapping all survey participants
  • 8. Conclusions; What have we learned
    • The enquiring Mind of the Digital Practitioner
    • The influence of Web2 behaviour & social media
    • Pragmatic use of what tech, old or new, works
    • Diversity of experiences & technology tapestries
    • The critical friendships between same subject tutors are under-utilised – so communities of practice fail to emerge
    • Professional practice of the Digital Practitioner could be transformed
  • 9. Ways Forward with the Digital Practitioner
    • Introduce professional meta-skills approach
    • Training to pedagogical not technology purpose
    • The meshing of CPD and Staff Development
    • The utilisation of IfL REfLECT
    Moving from staff development to reflective professional development
  • 10. Redefining Impact
    • Teachers are doing new things in new ways
    • Impact as exploring technology personally
    • Impact as input (change over time) and output (benefit over turbulence)
    • Benefits of confidence to apply technology based on pedagogic skills
  • 11. Designing for Teaching Transformation
    • Don’t fear fragmentation & turbulence
    • Trust the Digital Practitioner
    • Institutional Fixity & Stasis stifle initiative
    • Train to pedagogical purpose
    • Train to take the low hanging tech fruit
    • Build on professional confidence not processes that date rapidly
    • Teachers own the management of their own development
    • Use analytics to develop new approach to assessing impact
    • Develop the enquiring teacher through communities of like minds
    Nigel Ecclesfield FRSA MIfL (LSIS) [email_address] Geoff Rebbeck FRSA FIfL QTLS [email_address]
  • 12. The Digital Practitioner: Part 2; Data & Survey Info from the LSIS staff capability survey 2011
    • Nigel Ecclesfield LSIS & Geoff Rebbeck
  • 13. The resources of our enquiry Now we are 11….. Background; Survey of 16 FE Colleges, 700 Practitioners, Summer 2011 Survey structured against 7-levels of “higher level” thinking Survey offered structured & free text responses on user ‘feelings’ Learning Analytics; Using SurveyMonkey & Analytics to produce individual narratives Outcomes give, system, subject, institution & individual views Outcomes; Can professional practice drive new technology adoption? Creating ‘meta-skills’ framework to map the rise of the reflective practitioner See following slides for examples of these
  • 14. Survey Process Described graphically by Naomi Grew
  • 15.
    • An individual reflective narrative by a teacher. Derived & anonymised from the survey questions & free text responses
    Makeup and SFX. I find work carried out with the VLE improves the quality of my work and learner results;. I am developing e-learning modules to support my lesson and allow my learners to develop their skills further at their own pace outside the classroom. I use online assessment feedback forms that are anonymous, that help me develop modules that I deliver. I use texting with other staff as part of my work activity. I use my iPhone for texting, I would support texting within my learner group, however, policies at the college do not allow it. The texting i use within the team I work in allows us to keep up to date as we all work fractionally and do not always see each other. I am aware meeting colleagues is possible through the Internet. Up to now we have not had the products do develop online discussions within our team, however, as a team we have asked that we develop this so that we can create an online forum for us as a team and for our learners. We hope that this could be place for the new academic year. I am aware meeting students is possible through the Internet. As the previous answer explains, we have not had this set up, hopefully for the new academic year this will be in place. I create different types of resources for people to use in different ways. I have been developing online e-learning, I continue to place information, handouts regarding my lessons on online for my learners. Some of these resources have been taking by the college quality team to allow all lecturers to use them. I have seen an ipod (digital audio) work and understand what they are. Although I do use sound files as such I do record and film my demonstrations to the students and develop online tutorials with sound and vision. I have used imagery with my learners to create class records and activity to support learning. I continually use still images, within my lessons, handouts, and online resources. I use video and so do my students as and integral part of teaching and learning. I use video to film my learners as they develop ideas and play these back within the group for assessment, also use dvd to show historical content related to their lessons and topics. I have read blogs and know how to comment on one. Presently we do not have blogs setup, however as previously stated hoping to have these setup for the new academic year. I have used social media for personal uses. Again this is some thing we as a team have spoken about, developing for the new academic year. I have produced evaluations of experiences, training, conferences etc. As I work in a field that is ever expanding and changing daily, I am always on live locations, attending seminars etc, all of these I reflect on bring into my lessons for my learners to develop further. Teaching through technology is often guiding and supporting learners to their objectives. This could work for all, although training would need to be setup as a lot of teachers or a little techno phobe. When the learners see a teacher using systems that are common to them it instils respect, it also allows teams to work and gel better together. I have used communities on-line with professionals outside the College. I am part of a group that has develop an online academy within the area that I teach, this is also open to my learners to join. I have instigated circumstances where others have been brought into a collaborative project with me. Through my development of the e-learning platforms I have bought others in to create certain areas of my tutorial modules on-line. I have arranged for students to create and share resources amongst themselves to improve learning. I develop resources and get my learners to develop them further and share these with others within their own group and other on the course I teach, if they develop them well i then place them for others outside my course to use them. I am able to access and use e-learning resources to help me acquire new skills and knowledge of technology used in College. I constantly check the resources given to us from the college to see if they are of help to me. If not I research further a field. I participate in collaborative groups whose members are drawn from different organisations and circumstances. Due to the nature of my specialist area, I work with others outside my college to develop ideas that i can then bring into my lessons. I would describe my approach as being Collaborative.
  • 16. Gestalt or insight approach
    • The skills and knowledge demonstrated by our sample has not emerged from systematic use of technology following training.
    • It has emerged from the insightful use of technology to solve particular problems emerging in the interaction with learners and sometimes colleagues.
    • This professional understanding is supplemented by their experiences as users of technology in their personal lives as much as by training.
    • The fragmentary and possibly chaotic appearance of this technology tapestry is managed by adhering to common values of what constitutes effective teaching; the Matrix.
    Reflective thinking and writing is a process. Insight is the result (sometimes). Insight is seeing self as was and how to change self for the better.
  • 17. A tapestry of technologies
    • "Letting a hundred flowers blossom and a hundred schools of thought contend is the policy for promoting progress in the arts and the sciences and a flourishing socialist culture in our land."
    The centrality of the values of teaching & learning The uniqueness of each learning journey Word frequency from free-text answers in order Students Moodle Resources College Learning
  • 18. The Meta-skills Framework
    • A set of higher level thinking skills that defines approach
    • Based in teaching not technology
    • Universal application in teaching
    • Captured as soft skills through tagged text
    • Values not Quantum
    The following four slides listing the “Survey Interpretive Framework” show the 13 questions & 8 levels of response that provide the survey matrix
  • 19. The Survey Interpretive Framework
  • 20. The Survey Interpretive Framework
  • 21. The Survey Interpretive Framework
  • 22. The Survey Interpretive Framework
  • 23. The seven levels of higher-level thinking using “technology in action” Higher level thinking Indicative description 1 Drive to think & work flexibly The ability to use technology in different ways than originally covered in training or the Manual. Making technology bring learning to life. Personalising learning through the use of technology 2 Ability to adapt technology to purposeful pedagogy The ability to make technology contribute to learning for learners rather than seeing technology as an end in itself. Includes widening participation, increasing retention, particularly amongst hard-to-reach learners 3 Vision to create imaginative blended learning design Learning and demonstrating the skill of redesigning teaching and learning by blending in technology to other forms and methods of teaching and learning. This refers to skills developed through practice and engagement with peers and learners rather than in formal sessions or using formal learning resources 4 Curiosity to involve learners in curriculum delivery & design The Learner Voice. Involving learners in the design and personalising of learning. Student e-learning monitors in classes. Involving learners in the experience of learning in the widest sense 5 Imagination to develop future learning plans Using technology in helping learners to develop management of their own journey, to account for their learning and plan future learning. Improving the tutorial process, making learning more relevant to the needs of each individual learner 6 Desire to account for personal and purposeful effectiveness Using technology to develop the skills of reflective thinking. Capturing ideas and themes to inform teacher learning journeys through personal learning space. Developing professional accountability 7 Capacity to develop collaborative and cooperative working To look across and out of the organisation to work with and for others. An open mindedness. Working adaptively to accommodate the ideas of others. Assimilation of the best ideas.
  • 24. The Digital Practitioner; some thoughts
    • When the Digital Native turns professional
    • the curious Digital Practitioner emerges
    • Descriptive keywords should be pedagogic
    • Enquiring , professional, experimental,
    • Playful, student-centred
    • Learning transformation now more likely to come from professional practice than from institutional design.
    • Practitioners more trustworthy more likely to find new learning processes by experimenting with tools, apps, S/W, H/W, students
  • 25. The Digital Practitioner; what next?
    • New forms of professional development
    • New forms of professional community
    • Professional Development Communities
    • can collaboratively drive technology planning
    • Agile, integrated relationships between learning professionals and learning institutions built on student-centred learning
    • An institutionally-based approach to developing the support for the co-creation of learning
    Nigel Ecclesfield FRSA MIfL (LSIS) [email_address] Geoff Rebbeck FRSA FIfL QTLS [email_address] with Fred Garnett (LKL)
  • 26.
    • Resources
    Resources ; SurveyMonkey questions; http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/thanet-lsis-survey IfL Reflect Webfolio, the Curious & the Confident; https://reflect.ifl.ac.uk/viewasset.aspx?oid=3722297&type=webfolio Slides; http://www.slideshare.net/fredgarnett/digital-practitioner-2011 Blog Post; http://architectureofparticipation.wordpress.com/ Contact; [email_address]