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2012 Reenergize the Americas 6A: Salvador Cordero
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2012 Reenergize the Americas 6A: Salvador Cordero

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  • Load factor- the average load to peak load. High load factor is better.
  • Sort out panels thriugh authorized solar dealar for specific region were pvsytem being installed-Grade A or Grade B- need to come with certification and warranties.
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    • 1. Modeling and Simulation for Power Systems Salvador Cordero, MSSE Regional Cyber and Energy Security Center rces@utep.edu 915-747-5206 18 October 2012 Re-Energize the Americas Conference
    • 2. Topics• Why Modeling & Simulation?• Modeling & Simulation Tasks• Modeling Tool Parameters• Case Study • Solar PV System • Microgrid System• Summary Copyright @ The University of Texas at El Paso. Proprietary Information 2
    • 3. Why Modeling & Simulation? Copyright @ The University of Texas at El Paso. Proprietary Information 3
    • 4. Modeling & Simulation Tasks• Task 1: Modeling and Prediction of Baseline Energy Consumption. – Discover and quantify the energy consumption so that power system models can be developed for renewable energy sources, integration to current infrastructure, and deployment. – Discover the “As-Is” Energy System – Validate the models using measurement data• Task 2: Analysis for Co-generation and Renewable Energy Penetration – Evaluate performance model for the co-generation and renewable energy integration. – Combine the models for energy consumption and cost, and add cost benefit analysis model. The combined model allows the effects of renewable energy and co-generation installments to be studied from a performance and cost viewpoint – Develop a common template for evaluating different technologies. Copyright @ The University of Texas at El Paso. Proprietary Information 4
    • 5. Modeling Tool Parameters Inputs Results Loads, Financial Metrics:Components, Grid LCOE, IRR, NPV, Tie Payback, etc. HOMER Utility Rate *National Renewable Performance Structure Energy Laboratory (NREL) Metrics: Performance Capacity Factor, Component Model Annual Output Parameters Financial Model Other: Costs Energy flows, Cash Sensitivity Analysis flows, GraphsEconomics, SystemControl, Emissions, Controls Copyright @ The University of Texas at El Paso. Proprietary Information 5
    • 6. Case Study: Model InputsMain Campus and Physical Plants• Project Lifetime • 30 Years• Annual Interest Rate • 2%• Natural Gas Cost • $5.00/Mcf based on Facilities’ billing adjustment credits with supplier• Combined Rate Schedule • Current electric rate for Physical Plants • Current rate was considered for Main Campus • Blended flat rate for both loads (includes fuel adjustment) 1. Current is at 6.5¢/kWh 2. 15% increase at 7.4¢/kWh 3. 30% increase at 8.5¢/kWh Copyright @ The University of Texas at El Paso. Proprietary Information 6
    • 7. Case Study: Load Profiles Physical Plants*Electric Utility 30 minute meter readings Main Campus Copyright @ The University of Texas at El Paso. Proprietary Information 7
    • 8. Case Study: Load Profiles Thermal Load Copyright @ The University of Texas at El Paso. Proprietary Information 8
    • 9. Case Study: Baseline Model Results Main Campus & Physical Plants• Annual Electric Consumption of 62,619,500 kWh/yr• Annual Gas Consumption of 52,333,392 kWh/yr = 176,546 MMBtu Copyright @ The University of Texas at El Paso. Proprietary Information 9
    • 10. Case Study: Solar PV System • One load: Main Campus • Flat rate structure • Sensitivity Analysis on cost of Electricity (Current, 15%, 30% Increases) • Grid Tie Connection • Two Scenarios: 1. Baseline with 3.3 MW Solar PV 2. Baseline with 5.5 MW Solar PV • Solar PV System Specifications: 3.38 MW 5.5 MW Micro-Inverter(95.5% efficiency) 10 Degree Tilt 85% De-rating Factor 30 yr. Lifetime *SUNPOWER T10 Solar Roof TileCapital Cost-$12,864,280 Capital Cost-$20,900,000$ 3.80 per watt ( Panels & Inverters) $ 3.80 per watt ( Panels & Inverters) Copyright @ The University of Texas at El Paso. Proprietary Information 10
    • 11. Case Study: Solar PV System3.38 MW PV System 5.50 MW PV System 7,250KW 7,250KW 3,825KW2,130KW29.4% of Peak Load 52.8% of Peak Load Copyright @ The University of Texas at El Paso. Proprietary Information 11
    • 12. Case Study: Solar PV System Copyright @ The University of Texas at El Paso. Proprietary Information 12
    • 13. Case Study: Solar PV System• Annual Electrical Production 1. Baseline 0 kWh 2. 3.38 MW PV System 6,236,530 kWh kWh’s 3. 5.50 MW PV System 10,139,876 kWh Saved• Annual Grid Purchases 1. Baseline 46,880,920 kWh 13% 2. 3.38 MW PV System 40,644,392 kWh Reduction 3. 5.50 MW PV System 36,929,608 kWh 22% Reduction Copyright @ The University of Texas at El Paso. Proprietary Information 13
    • 14. Case Study: Solar PV System Current Rate 15% Increase 30% Increase Main Campus BaselineCost of Electricity $3,261,809 $3,751,083 $4,240,354LCOE 7.0¢/kWh 8.1¢/kWh 9.1¢/kWh 3.38 MW SystemCost of Electricity $2,845,108 $3,271,874 $3,698,640LCOE 7.3¢/kWh 8.2¢/kWh 9.1¢/kWhSavings $416,701 $479,209 $541,714ROI -2.8% 11.7% 26.3% 5.50 MW SystemCost of Electricity $2,585,073 $2,972,833 $3,360,594LCOE 7.6¢/kWh 8.4¢/kWh 9.1¢/kWhSavings $676,736 $778,250 $879,760ROI -3.0% 11.5% 26.1% Copyright @ The University of Texas at El Paso. Proprietary Information 14
    • 15. Case Study: Microgrid SystemAssumptions:• Two electrical loads: Main Campus and Physical Plants• One thermal load• Constant cost for Natural Gas• No Grid Tie Connection• Self-Generation • 5.5 MW PV System • CHP System with two 7.5 MW Turbines• Energy Storage System (1 MWh) Copyright @ The University of Texas at El Paso. Proprietary Information 15
    • 16. Case Study: Microgrid SystemComponent Specifications:• Solar PV System • Size- 5.5 MW • Derating factor- 82% • Cost- $20,900,000• CHP System • Size- Two 7.5 MW turbine generators *SUNPOWER T10 Solar Roof Tile • Efficiency- 83.7% • Heat recovery- 75% • Cost- $20,741,284• Energy Storage System • Capacity- 1 MWh • Voltage- 12 V *Solar Turbines Centaur 70 • Round trip efficiency- 90% • Cost- $1,000,000• Total Investment Cost = $42,641,284 *Xtreme Power DPR Copyright @ The University of Texas at El Paso. Proprietary Information 16
    • 17. Case Study: Microgrid System Copyright @ The University of Texas at El Paso. Proprietary Information 17
    • 18. Facility Case Study: Microgrid System Current Rate 15% Increase 30% Increase Baseline for Combined LoadsCost of Electricity (Annual) $4,070,259 $4,633,833 $5,322,647Cost of Gas (Annual) $1,001,033 $1,001,033 $1,001,033LCOE 6.5¢/kWh 7.4¢/kWh 8.5¢/kWhTotal Utility Cost (Annual) $5,071,292 $5,756,367 $6,382,561 Microgrid SystemLCOE 7.7¢/kWhTotal Operating Cost $3,942,864/yr.Savings $1,128,428 $1,813,503 $2,439,697ROI -21% 28% 72% *ROI based on initial investment of $42,641,284 and only 30 year lifecycle. Copyright @ The University of Texas at El Paso. Proprietary Information 18
    • 19. Summary: Case StudyIntegrating energy resources into a comprehensive management strategycan optimize energy security and system reliability to avoid grid standbycharges and/or outages.• Solar PV reduces peak demand and yearly operating costs• Multiple units will provide power generation redundancy to improve reliability and avoid electric rate stand-by charges.• Multiple units reduces individual operational running times which extend system’s lifetime and provides maintenance flexibility.• Hybrid co-generation of Solar PV and gas turbines provide load balancing capability to a micro-grid: o Co-generation backs up the solar PV systems during periods of intermittency to avoid grid demand charges Copyright @ The University of Texas at El Paso. Proprietary Information 19
    • 20. Questions Copyright @ The University of Texas at El Paso. Proprietary Information 20

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