CRPs Phase 2:  A dialogue with Donors and Partners
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CRPs Phase 2: A dialogue with Donors and Partners

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Montpellier, France, 17-18th June 2013

Montpellier, France, 17-18th June 2013

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  • MAIZE developed by more than 342 (179) partners. Identification of Priority Topics (refinement) of MAIZE R4D needs during launch of MAIZE CRP in 2012.• Partners are highly supportive of the operationalization of the MAIZE CRP; especially key features such as rapid responsiveness to MLN and the MAIZE Competitive Grants Initiative.• 85% of MAIZE CRP is bilateral – constantly re-prioritized by funders and doers – Fingers on the donor and partner pulse.• Increased gender transformation focus being encouraged internally and by bilateral donors and CO. Learning lessons from new bilateral projects.• Increased outcomes focus being encouraged internally and by bilateral donors and CO. Focus more on aggregate CRP change – What are the needs of the CRP? Everything is going well – only 1.5 years in operation. SI
  • 40% of total funds flowing through to partners• Currently 146 partners: 39 funded through Windows 1&2 and 107 funded through bilateral projects• Showcase CO Partnership Survey results o Third position after GRiSP and WHEATo Ranked either 1st or 2nd on 12 partnership criteria (out of a total of 26 criteria) Accountability = 2nd Capacity Development = 1st  Nurturing skills and knowledge 2nd  Facilitating access to knowledge = 2nd  Insightful communications 1st  Timely external communications 2nd  Global experience = 2nd  Local expertise 2nd  Sector specific knowledge 1st  Research into significant outputs 2nd  Distribute funding fairly = 2nd (with GRiSP) Working effectively with partners 1st
  • Development of nine Strategic Initiative (SIs) or Flagship Projects• Follow-up/refinement of R4D during MAIZE launch in 2012.o Priority R4D Topics identified during launch workshop  Incorporation into Windows 1&2 funded component of work plan Windows 1&2 funds payroll MAIZE CGI partners (37 in 2012)Flagships capture strategic areas research – unlikely to change significantly within next 6 - 9 years. MAIZE StAC will review and revise SIs as necessary. Development of Strategic Thrusts – Example (Aflatoxin Mitigation), MLN, Small-scale mechanization, heat and drought tolerance etc. New Strategic Thrusts are likely to materialize within the 6 - 9 year time frame; others are likely increase or decrease in priority
  • Currently 75 operational Innovation Platforms (learning platforms, technology dissemination platforms and hybrids)• Another 12 coming through the AfDB SARD-SC Project• Opportunities for combining innovation platformso SIMLEZA + SARD-SC + Africa Rising (in Eastern Province –Zambia)
  • Three pathways:o Research Strategy 1: Sustainable Intensification and income opportunities for the poor o Research Strategy 2: New maize varieties for the pooro Research Strategy 3: Integrated post-harvest management• Each research Strategy delivers/contributes to delivery of:o Output(s) e.g., High yielding and stress tolerant maize lines and varietieso Immediate Outcome(s) e.g., Improved maize varieties (high-yielding, stress tolerant, nutrient enhanced) adapted and promoted by NARES, NGO, and private seed companies.o Intermediate Development Outcomes(s) e.g., Smallholder farmers adopt improved maize varieties (high-yielding, stress tolerant, nutrient enhanced) or Increased yields of maize for smallholder farmers, Increased income of smallholder farmers and Increased nutritional diet.o Strategic Goal(s) e.g., Enhanced food security, Enhanced livelihoods and Enhance nutrition and improved healtho System Level Outcomes e.g., Increasing food security, Reducing rural poverty and Improving nutrition and health
  • • Output: New high yielding, stress tolerant and nutrient enhanced maize varieties• Immediate Development Outcome: Regional on-station testing• Immediate Development Outcome: Regional on-farm testing• Immediate Development Outcome: Variety Registration• Immediate Development Outcome: Seed Production• Intermediate Development Outcome: Smallholder farmers adopt improved maize varieties• Intermediate Development Outcome: Increased yields of maize for smallholder farmers, Increased income of smallholder farmers and Increased nutritional diet• Impact: Regional adoption• Impact: Improved SLOs
  • Eastern and Southern Africa – KARI• Western and Central Africa - University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria• Latin America – IICA• South Asia -National Academy of Agricultural Research Management (India)• Discuss MAIZE CGI – First regional (compared to traditional national) coordination by national partners (KARI, NAARM, IICA and ObafemiAwolowo University, Nigeria)
  • • W 1&2 - Innovation network analysis for improved technology delivery and out-scaling in maize-based systems – two in-house innovation systems experts and Wageningen University.• W 1&2 - Assess the performance of maize following promiscuous soybean and cowpea varieties and quantify N benefits to maize – IITA and national partners.• W 1&2 - Identification of biomass management constraints and implications for adoption of CA practices in mixed crop livestock systems • Promote local adoption of soybean in maize-based systems that reduce the need for synthetic nitrogen fertilizer – ZARI – MAIZE CGI.• Build local capacity to better understand maize-legume interactions and promote local adoption of soybean and/or cowpeas in maize-based CA systems – IIAM - MAIZE CGI• Decision guides for nutrient management – Eastern Africa – IPNI - MAIZE CGI
  • DTMA project 13 countries• 30,000 MT of commercial DT seed in 2012• Commercialization of DT maize varieties in South Asia via IMIC• Support for commercialization of DT maize varieties through MAIZE Competitive Grants Initiative (Windows 1&2 performance- focused grants to partners)• 11 private sector seed companies• Somalia, Rwanda, Uganda, Kenya, Tanzania, Mozambique, Zimbabwe, Angola, Ghana & Nepal. (MAIZE CGI)• Stronger (and formal) partnerships with relevant entities• AGRA/PASS• IMAS/IRMA/WEMA/SIMLESA• SARD-SC/ISMA/AFRICARISING/National Initiatives
  • • 91 breeders from developing countries in Latin America, Africa and Asia received training on Doubled Haploid breeding• A Doubled Haploid facility has been established at CIMMYT HQ, Mexico.• A second facility is under development in sub-Saharan Africa.• All funded through W 1&2

CRPs Phase 2: A dialogue with Donors and Partners Presentation Transcript

  • 1. CRPs Phase 2: A dialogue with Donors and Partners Montpellier, France, 17-18th June 2013
  • 2. Todays Agenda • Prioritizing MAIZE CRP Research 4 Development • Partners and Prioritization • Supporting Partnerships • Flagship Projects • Outcomes-focused Performance • MAIZE Impact Pathways & Theories of Change, IDOs & KPIs • Partnerships for Performance • Regional assessments of the maize situation and outlook • SIMLESA and MasAgro • DTMA , Maize Lethal Necrosis, Doubled Haploid Breeding • AflasafeTM • The Way Forward
  • 3. Partners and Prioritization
  • 4. Supporting Partnerships Mean Min Max Wheat76 Maize91 GRiSP129 A NutH34 AquaSys20 CCAFS198 DryCer48 DrySys87 Forest78 G-Bank64 Legume79 HTrop23 Fish 76 Policy 70 RTub83 WLEco 58 Accessible people/information 64 48 80 67 68 70 68 80 70 63 56 65 61 75 48 63 57 63 53 Accountability 57 43 71 63 66 71 65 60 60 52 57 60 58 62 43 57 46 53 45 Capacity development 51 33 65 59 65 57 53 35 56 50 51 53 55 53 57 47 33 46 43 Complete/accurate information available 47 35 57 55 49 57 47 35 46 50 48 53 47 52 43 45 36 43 40 Developing partner networks 64 53 77 68 67 77 59 65 69 63 63 60 66 66 61 62 53 61 57 Distributing funding fairly 41 20 51 46 48 48 47 20 48 40 43 51 45 44 35 45 34 33 33 Facilitating access to knowledge 67 52 80 80 79 75 71 75 72 58 60 68 66 71 57 62 57 65 52 Fairly sharing workload/responsibilities 56 41 71 64 64 71 68 45 59 52 51 56 58 65 57 55 41 46 47 Global expertise 80 69 89 89 87 89 82 75 79 79 69 86 83 80 83 76 74 83 69 Helping others to innovate 61 43 72 72 67 71 68 60 67 60 55 56 64 70 57 62 43 53 47 High quality research High-caliber staff Innovation Insightful external communications 52 25 66 66 58 64 56 25 57 54 45 53 56 59 43 59 49 41 40 61 53 72 72 67 66 62 60 59 54 53 67 56 72 57 58 57 53 55 70 57 85 80 77 85 74 80 72 65 63 73 64 76 65 62 61 65 57 64 50 74 74 74 71 65 70 69 56 61 72 56 65 65 64 50 58 52 Involving partners in decisions 54 46 75 57 56 63 59 75 62 56 52 49 47 58 48 47 46 48 48 Local expertise 64 44 80 72 73 71 65 80 64 71 56 63 61 59 70 58 44 64 55 Not duplicating efforts 53 43 62 62 56 58 59 60 55 50 45 54 55 53 52 54 43 51 48 Nurturing skills/knowledge 58 41 69 66 68 69 62 55 65 54 55 59 56 58 61 53 41 57 48 Research addresses agriculture challenges 73 60 84 84 76 84 82 75 75 69 69 81 72 72 74 64 60 66 64 Research addresses development challenges 66 55 81 79 76 81 74 60 69 63 55 72 69 71 61 59 59 59 55 Research results in significant outputs 66 50 80 80 79 78 74 55 71 67 57 74 69 70 57 64 57 61 50 Responsive to partners/clients 61 41 75 71 70 69 65 75 68 63 59 60 59 67 48 51 44 59 41 Sector-specific knowledge 76 64 85 84 85 84 82 85 75 67 64 81 77 72 78 74 67 80 67 Sharing credit 57 46 67 63 63 67 56 50 66 54 51 58 61 62 48 59 46 52 48 Timely external communciations 64 47 75 75 73 72 71 65 72 58 57 62 59 71 57 64 47 60 57 Working effectively with partners 68 49 81 75 81 78 74 75 76 63 56 71 69 75 74 63 49 55 55 1823 1792 1846 1708 1595 1701 1531 1451 1657 1589 1698 1499 1527 1294 1475 1326 61 50 71 70 69 71 66 61 65 59 56 64 61 65 58 59 50 57 51 No Rank 1 10 4 10 0 5 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 No Rank 2 6 8 6 1 2 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 No Rank 15 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 2 0 1 0 3 3 7 3 9 No Rank 16 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 4 0 0 0 2 0 12 1 5 Total scores Average • 40% of total funds flow through to partners • Ranked either 1st or 2nd on 12 partnership criteria out of 26
  • 5. Flagship Products 1.Socioeconomics and policies for maize futures 2.Sustainable intensification and income opportunities for the poor 3.Smallholder precision agriculture 4.Stress tolerant maize for the poorest 5.Towards doubling maize productivity 6.Integrated postharvest management 7.Nutritious maize (with CRP4) 8.Seeds of discovery 9.New tools & methods for NARS & SMEs 1-9. Strengthening local capacities
  • 6. Todays Agenda • Prioritizing MAIZE CRP Research 4 Development • Partners and Prioritization • Supporting Partnerships • Flagship Projects • Outcomes-focused Performance • MAIZE Impact Pathways & Theories of Change, IDOs & KPIs • Partnerships for Performance • Regional assessments of the maize situation and outlook • SIMLESA and MasAgro • DTMA , Maize Lethal Necrosis, Doubled Haploid Breeding • AflasafeTM • The Way Forward
  • 7. Outcomes-focused Performance
  • 8. Users of MAIZE Germplasm Demand for MAIZE germplasm
  • 9. Innovation Platforms: Worldwide • 75 operational Innovation Platforms expanding to 100 • KIT - Improving • Combining Effectiveness of Innovation Platforms Innovation Platforms
  • 10. Taking stock of innovation platforms: Understanding how best to mobilize science and technology for development KIT
  • 11. Todays Agenda • Prioritizing MAIZE CRP Research 4 Development • Partners and Prioritization • Supporting Partnerships • Flagship Projects • Outcomes-focused Performance • MAIZE Impact Pathways & Theories of Change, IDOs & KPIs • Partnerships for Performance • Regional assessments of the maize situation and outlook • SIMLESA and MasAgro • DTMA , Maize Lethal Necrosis, Doubled Haploid Breeding • AflasafeTM • The Way Forward
  • 12. MAIZE CRP: Output-Outcome Mapping Enhanced livelihoods Positive sustainable change in the natural environment Increased productivity and stability of farming systems Intermediate Development Outcome Better targeting and support of new technologies and institutional innovations. Immediate Development Outcomes Results of ex-ante and ex-post analysis utilized by policy and decision-makers. Knowledge, tools, and methods for better targeting of interventions and policy and institutional innovations for enhancing maize technology adoption, inclusiveness, gender equity, market access, and reducing vulnerability Enhanced food security Increased income of smallholder farmers Increased yields of maize for smallholder farmers Profitable, resource efficient maize-based farming systems and value-chain innovations adopted by smallholder farmers Profitable, resource efficient maize-based farming systems and value-chain innovations locally adapted by NARES and promoted by public, NGO, and private sector Improving nutrition and health Enhance nutrition and improved health Increased nutritional diet Improved maize varieties (high-yielding, stress tolerant, nutrient enhanced) adapted and promoted by NARES, NGO, and private seed companies. Reduced postharvest losses Smallholder farmers adopt improved maize varieties (high-yielding, stress tolerant, nutrient enhanced) Smallholder farmers adopt post-harvest technologies Maize breeding gains are achieved more quickly and efficiently by public and private sector breeders with a broader genetic base Cutting-edge data and knowledge on maize genetic diversity and sources of new allelic variation are utilized by public and private sector Integrated and scalable innovations that improve market access and increase the productivity, sustainability, and resilience of maize-based farming systems Result Strategy 1 19 % Increasing food security Sustainable precision maize management advice and practices Result Strategy 1 25 % High yielding and stress tolerant maize lines and varieties Result Strategy 2 International consortia for maize improvement. Result Strategy 2 Maize lines and varieties that are bio-fortified for pro-vitamin A, zinc, or essential amino acids. Result Strategy 2 55 % Data on the characterization of international maize landrace collections and valuable haplotypes available. Result Strategy 2 Reduced aflatoxin in maize value chain Smallholder farmers adopt mycotoxin mitigation technologies Outcome facilitation Strategic Goals Research Outputs: products Reducing rural poverty Sustainable management of natural resources Post-harvest technologies are promoted by NARES, NGO, and private companies Outcome facilitation System Level Outcomes NARS and SMEs utilize novel tools to accelerate maize breeding gains for smallholder farmers Genomics and bioinformatics tools, breeding and phenotyping approaches for NARS and SMEs. Result Strategy 2 Integrated approaches for reducing postharvest losses and mycotoxin contamination Result Strategy 3 5%
  • 13. Theory of Change for Results Strategy 2: New Maize varieties for the Poor System-level Impacts External factors Natural events Trends Improved SLOs Research and Engagement with Policy makers New knowledge, tools and methods New policies/ instruments Assumptions National government, INGOs and private sector scale-out the new varieties Increased income of smallholder farmers Research and Engagement with Policy makers Private sector NARS Communities Research and Engagement with individuals households Institutional, market and maize value chain innovations knowledge on socioeconomic dynamics and drivers of agrarian change Regional adoption New or better functioning institutions, markets and maize value chains Increased yields of maize for smallholder farmers Smallholder farmers adopt improved maize varieties Seed Production Variety Registration Regional on-farm testing Household & farmlevel data used for targeting maize varieties Implementation Theory Outputs Increased nutritional diet Assumptions Seed companies & NARS have capacity (technical/financial) to produce breeders & basic seed. Improved market opportunity for farmers Assumptions Farmers’ are convinced of the value of new maize varieties and are willing and able to purchase. Seed companies deliver quality seed ,at a competitive price ,in a timely manner. New maize varieties are more profitable than existing commercial varieties or confer greater fitness for the farmers’ environment. Assumptions Seed companies & NARS have capacity (technical/financial) to produce breeders & basic seed. Assumptions Seed companies & NARS are willing & able to put new maize varieties NPT testing &/or DUS Regional on-station testing Assumptions Public (NARS) and Private (SME seed companies) are willing and able to test new germplasm. Germplasm originating from MAIZE CRP is better than commercial checks New high yielding, stress tolerant and nutrient enhanced maize varieties Assumptions Public (NARS) and Private (SME seed companies) are willing and able to test new germplasm. Germplasm originating from MAIZE CRP is better than commercial checks Programme Theory
  • 14. Intermediate Development Outcomes (IDOs)
  • 15. • IDO 1. Increased productivity and stability of farming systems • IDO 2. Increased income of small holder farmers • System-Level Outcomes SLO1 Reducing Rural Poverty SLO2 Increasing Food Security SLO3 Improving Health & Health • Intermediate Development Outcomes • IDO 2. Increased income of small holder farmers • IDO3. Increased yields of maize for smallholder farmers IDO4. Increased nutritional diet Research Strategy 3: Integrated PostHarvest Management • Intermediate Development Outcomes Research Strategy 2: New Maize Varieties for the Poor Research Strategy 1: Sustainable Intensification and income opportunities for the poor • System-Level Outcomes • SLO1 Reducing Rural Poverty • SLO4 Sustainable management of natural resources • System-Level Outcomes SLO2 Increasing Food Security SLO3 Improving Health & Health • Intermediate Development Outcomes • IDO5 Reduced postharvest losses • IDO6. Reduced aflatoxin in maize value chain
  • 16. Todays Agenda • Prioritizing MAIZE CRP Research 4 Development • Partners and Prioritization • Supporting Partnerships • Flagship Projects • Outcomes-focused Performance • MAIZE Impact Pathways & Theories of Change, IDOs & KPIs • Partnerships for Performance • Regional assessments of the maize situation and outlook • SIMLESA and MasAgro • DTMA , Maize Lethal Necrosis, Doubled Haploid Breeding • AflasafeTM • The Way Forward
  • 17. Research Strategy 1: Sustainable Intensification and income opportunities for the poor Latin Asia America Africa
  • 18. Regional assessments of the maize situation and outlook and investment opportunities to ensure regional food security
  • 19. Institutional commitment Cell phone based M&E
  • 20. Policy commitment: Linking maize R & D MAIZE MasAgro SeeD - SINAREF: National System of Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture - INIFAP: National Genetic Resources Center - CINVESTAV, IPN IMIC Incentives for Seed Companies to improve quality standards and to produce improved seed and vegetative material TTF PROMAF Intensification in medium to high potential zones Less than 3 ha Program: SINAREFI: Incentives for farmers that conserve maize landraces Extension Services: Training and promotion of MasAgro technologies •Increase in yield/ha •Increase in production •Increase in farmers income
  • 21. Sustainable intensification of maizelegume systems in E&S Africa Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania, Malawi and Mozambique >> Botswana, Rwanda, South Sudan, Uganda, Zambia, Zimbabwe. Partners include: NARS, CIMMYT, ICRISAT, Australian organizations, ASARECA Target: > 500,000 farm families
  • 22. Need and opportunities for gender mainstreaming
  • 23. Research Strategy 2: Maize varieties – stress tolerant, nutritious, safe
  • 24. Drought Tolerant Maize for Africa
  • 25. Seed Road Map – 2nd generation DT maize 80 70 We are here 70 55 50 41 40 29 30 19 20 9 10 1 3 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 0 2009 1000 MT 60
  • 26. Seed Production Projections 12.00 8.00 6.00 4.00 2.00 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 BEN ANG GHA MOZ UGA TAN MLI ETH ZAM KEN MWI NGA 0.00 ZIM Volume (000 MT) 10.00
  • 27. Rapid Response to Maize Lethal Necrosis Disease in Eastern Africa
  • 28. ? ? ?
  • 29. MLN Facts and Actions
  • 30. Promising CIMMYT inbreds and pre-release hybrids identified MLN-resistant line MLN-susceptible line MLN-resistant line MLN-susceptible line MLN-resistant line
  • 31. Doubled Haploids: The Number 1 MAIZE technology demanded by NARES and SMES
  • 32. Research Strategy 3: Integrated post-harvest management
  • 33. AflasafeTM • Development and field testing of aflasafe™ 2009 to 2012 • Significantly reduces aflatoxin contamination of maize • Adoption of aflasafeTM by extension agencies in Nigeria • Low-cost manufacturing facility
  • 34. Todays Agenda • Prioritizing MAIZE CRP Research 4 Development • Partners and Prioritization • Supporting Partnerships • Flagship Projects • Outcomes-focused Performance • MAIZE Impact Pathways & Theories of Change, IDOs & KPIs • Partnerships for Performance • Regional assessments of the maize situation and outlook • SIMLESA and MasAgro • DTMA , Maize Lethal Necrosis, Doubled Haploid Breeding • AflasafeTM • The Way Forward
  • 35. The Way Forward • Strong impact & delivery orientation in many MAIZE projects • Streamlining: ToC, IDOs, KPIs … across diverse regions, projects • More realism is needed: • • “Assessing germplasm impact annually at a global level” Role of IAR and CRPs versus role of partners – They are at the interface of farm level impact • Test robustness of impact pathways, ToC, IDOs, KPIs – consultancies in 2nd half of 2013 • Develop Partnership and Capacity-Building Strategy • Invest in performance partnerships (i.e., those that deliver)
  • 36. Thanks! Contact: Dr Dave Watson MAIZE CRP Programme Manager d.watson@cgiar.org www.maize.org