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Commercialisation of fodder & fodder seed production by louise mugweni

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Commercialisation of fodder & fodder seed production by louise mugweni

  1. 1. LOUISE MUGWENI Commercialisation of Fodder & Fodder Seed Production African Livestock Conference & Exhibition (18-20 June 2014)
  2. 2. Background and Rational - Many parts of Southern Africa experience cyclical droughts - Resultantly loss of livestock and curtail rangeland grazing opportunities - Animals in response to these shocks lose market value - Spread of animal disease & decline in the health and herd numbers of livestock - Price constraints and distance from fodder markets - Smallholders risk facing a diminishing profitability in their enterprises - Evident need to bolster fodder supplies
  3. 3. Zambia Fodder Pilot (ZFP) Project (2012-2014) - US$2 Million USAID/OFDA funded - Choma, Kazungula & Sesheke Districts - Researched, developed and tested fodder and fodder seed production systems - Use of appropriate technologies - Income generating opportunities to 920 small fodder suppliers
  4. 4. Approaches towards commercialisation Step 1: FODDER AS A CROP -PROMOTIONAL MESSAGES -Focus on FARMERS TO PRODUCE FODDER FIRST Step 2: FODDER AS A BUSINESS -Market research -Presentation of gross margins -Marketing
  5. 5. - Demonstration plots - Use of farmer field schools - Fodder and fodder seed on-field management practices - Construction of fodder and fodder seed storage facilities - Fodder IGAs training and mentoring - Artisan training, toolkit procurement and distribution (start-up toolkit enabled them to market and sell harvesting tools to fodder farmers) - Development of a Fodder and fodder seed production manual Approaches towards commercialisation
  6. 6. - Grasses:  Rhodes grass  Napier grass  Foxtail grass  Forage sorghum - Legumes:  Velvet beans  Cowpea  Sunn hemp (Red)  Dolichos - Maize silage
  7. 7. Categories of farmers engaged in commercialization 1. Fodder producers who had no livestock (started off with a commercial perspective in mind) 2. Fodder producers who had livestock and engaged in inter- farm enterprise transfers – farmers who realised changes- increase in milk production, improved body condition- increased ha in second season 3. Specialised seed producers
  8. 8. Strides made towards commercialisation - 594.58 ha have been put under commercial fodder or fodder seed production by 920 (537F:383M) - 83.5% applied at least one technology - 17 sold and 65 entered into agreements - 242 farmers linked to 82 fodder producers - 32 artisans trained in sustainable fodder production fodder production systems and technologies - 20 fodder seed growers monitored by the Seed Certification and Control Institute
  9. 9. Constraints - Low literacy levels - Farmer dependency syndrome - Unpredictable weather conditions affecting harvests
  10. 10. Lessons Learnt - Market driven approach - Fodder production was a new product on the market that required more time - Short term nature of programme does not declare conclusive results - Coordination and planning- timely availing of inputs - Involvement of government ministries
  11. 11. Other models of commercialisation - Out grower models- In Ethiopia 583 farmers under the EDDP linked to a seed company US$1,449 (2008/9) ; US8,211 (2009/10) ; US$11,484 (2010/11) - Farmer society-owned large scale fodder production - Large scale commercial fodder producers supplying farmers and dairy societies- Red Dane & Debrians Farms in Zimbabwe
  12. 12. THANK YOU!!

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