US History Ch 10.3

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US History Ch 10.3

  1. 1. U.S. History Chapter 10: Launching the New Nation Section 3: Troubles Abroad
  2. 2. The French Revolution <ul><li>July 14, 1789: French Revolution begins with the Storming of the Bastille </li></ul>
  3. 3. The French Revolution <ul><li>Monarchy overthrown & republic established </li></ul>
  4. 4. The French Revolution <ul><li>American Reaction </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Support among those who believed France was establishing a democratic republic </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Displeasure among those worried about riots & violence </li></ul></ul>
  5. 5. U.S. Neutrality <ul><li>France & Britain go to war </li></ul><ul><li>Americans divided </li></ul>
  6. 6. U.S. Neutrality <ul><li>Neutrality Proclamation —stated that the U.S. should remain neutral in all European conflicts </li></ul>
  7. 7. Citizen Genet <ul><li>Edmond Genet sent as France’s representative to America </li></ul><ul><li>Traveled across country seeking support for France </li></ul>Edmond Genet
  8. 8. Citizen Genet <ul><li>Privateers —private ships authorized by a nation to attack its enemies </li></ul><ul><li>Washington warns Genet his actions threaten U.S. neutrality </li></ul>
  9. 9. Citizen Genet <ul><li>Genet says he will seek to have Washington overruled </li></ul><ul><li>Pro-French Thomas Jefferson agrees Genet should be sent home </li></ul>
  10. 10. Jay’s Treaty <ul><li>Threats to American neutrality: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>1793: Britain seizes US ships carrying food from the French West Indies </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Captured merchant ships </li></ul></ul>
  11. 11. Jay’s Treaty <ul><li>Threats to American neutrality: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Rumors about British officers encouraging Indian uprisings </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Britain never abandoned frontier forts </li></ul></ul>
  12. 12. Jay’s Treaty <ul><li>John Jay: Chief Justice sent to London to negotiate an agreement to avoid war </li></ul>John Jay
  13. 13. Jay’s Treaty <ul><li>Jay’s Treaty —made to avoid a war between Britain and the United States </li></ul>
  14. 14. Jay’s Treaty <ul><li>British Concessions </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Pay for damages to seized American ships </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Small American ships allowed to trade in Caribbean </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Abandon frontier forts </li></ul></ul>
  15. 15. Jay’s Treaty <ul><li>Unresolved issues: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Nothing noted about large ships </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Native American issue unaddressed </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Slaves freed during Revolutionary War not returned </li></ul></ul>
  16. 16. Jay’s Treaty <ul><li>Despite dislikes, Washington urges approval of treaty </li></ul>John Jay being burned “in effigy”
  17. 17. Pinckney’s Treaty <ul><li>Border between U.S. and Spanish Florida disputed </li></ul><ul><li>Spain closes port of New Orleans to U.S. trade </li></ul>
  18. 18. Pinckney’s Treaty <ul><li>Thomas Pinckney sent to resolve dispute </li></ul>
  19. 19. Pinckney’s Treaty <ul><li>Pinckney's requests </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Reopen New Orleans to U.S. trade </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Right of deposit at New Orleans </li></ul></ul>
  20. 20. Pinckney’s Treaty <ul><li>Negotiations </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Spain delays hoping U.S. will become desperate </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Spain begins to worry U.S. & Britain will join forces against Spain </li></ul></ul>
  21. 21. Pinckney’s Treaty <ul><li>The Treaty </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Span agrees to change Florida border </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Port of New Orleans reopened </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Right of deposit acquired </li></ul></ul>

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