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Online quality Mexico

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I delivered this talk via video conference to a 3-university meeting attempting to define a common standard for quality in online teaching. I looked at quality from perspective of Three Generations of Onlien Pedagogy. I may have just shared my mixed feelings about quality control systems in these slides

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Online quality Mexico

  1. 1. Quality Online Teaching and Learning - Is it really different than campus-based education? Terry Anderson, PhD Professor Emeritus Athabasca University, Canada Conferencia Red MECDL (UNAM, UADY, UABC) Tijauna, Mexico Sept 27, 2016
  2. 2. Who is Quality For?? Slide Credit – Int. Conf. on Quality Assurance in Higher Education in Africa, Windhoek, 2016 Enhancing quality and combating corruption in higher education: A global perspective Uvalić-Trumbić s. & Daniel J. http://sirjohn.ca/wordpress/wp- content/uploads/2012/08/SUTJSD1_Windhoek_Red1.pdf
  3. 3. Three types of Quality Control Slide Credit – Int. Conf. on Quality Assurance in Higher Education in Africa, Windhoek, 2016 Enhancing quality and combating corruption in higher education: A global perspective Uvalić-Trumbić s. & Daniel J. http://sirjohn.ca/wordpress/wp-
  4. 4. John Daniel’s Iron Triangle http://www.slideshare.net/ODLAA/education-across-space-and-time-sir-john-daniel
  5. 5. Quality Dilemma Innovation
  6. 6. Example Quality Depends on Learning Design
  7. 7. Quality Depends on Pedagogy
  8. 8. Three Generations of Flexible Learning Pedagogies 1. Behaviourist/Cognitive – Self Paced, Individual study 2. Social Constructivist – Groups 3. Connectivist – Networks and Collectives “To name things is to recognize them: It is the way we learn about our environment” H. Gossage 1967 Anderson, T., & Dron, J. (2011). Three generations of distance education pedagogy IRRODL 12(3), 80-97. http://www.irrodl.org/index.php/irrodl/article/view/890/1826.
  9. 9. 1. Behavioural/Cognitive Pedagogies • “tell ‘em what you’re gonna tell ‘em, • tell ‘em • then tell ‘em what you told ‘em” Direct Instruction
  10. 10. Gagne’s Events of Instruction (1965) 1. Gain learners' attention 2. Inform learner of objectives 3. Stimulate recall of previous information 4. Present stimulus material 5. Provide learner guidance 6. Elicit performance 7. Provide Feedback 8. Assess performance 9. Enhance transfer opportunities
  11. 11. Enhanced by the “cognitive revolution” • Chunking • Cognitive Load • Working Memory • Multiple Representations • Split-attention effect • Variability Effect • Multi-media effect – (Sorden, 2005) “learning as acquiring and using conceptual and cognitive structures” Greeno, Collins and Resnick, 1996
  12. 12. Focus is on the Content and the Individual Learner
  13. 13. Nature of Knowledge • Knowledge is logically coherent, existing independent of perspective • Context free • Capable of being transmitted • Assumes closed systems with discoverable relationships between inputs and outputs
  14. 14. Behaviourist/Cognitive Technologies Content is king
  15. 15. • What are quality indicators for cognitive- behavioral generation e-learning?
  16. 16. Quality is • Clearness of presentation • Logical sequence of events • Timely and accurate feedback • Clear instructions and activities • Rubrics and transparent assessment
  17. 17. 1st Generation, Cognitive Behavioural Pedagogy Summary • Scalable • Few requirements, or opportunities, for social learning • Works most efficiently with individual learning models • Effective and efficient for some types of learning • Have we really taught learners to succeed with this type of learning?
  18. 18. 18 2nd Generation Social Constructivist Pedagogy • Group Orientated • Membership and exclusion, closed • Not scalable - max 50 students/course • Classrooms - at a distance or on campus • Hierarchies of control • Focus on collaboration and shared purpose group
  19. 19. Constructivist Knowledge is: • Knowledge is constructed, not transmitted • Arrived at through dialogic encounters (Bakhtin,) - the presence of others adds motivation, conflicting ideas, social validation • Teacher as group facilitator “Dialogic as an epistemological framework supports an account of education as the discursive construction of shared knowledge” Wegerif, R.
  20. 20. Constructivist Learning in Groups • Long history of research and study • Established sets of tools – Classrooms – Learning Management Systems (LMS) – Synchronous (chat, video & net conferencing) – Email, wikis, blogs • Need to develop face to face, mediated and blended group learning skills Garrison, R., Anderson, T., & Archer, W. (2000). Critical thinking in text-based environment: Computer conferencing in higher education. The Internet and Higher Education, 2(2), 87-105.
  21. 21. • What is quality in social constructivist pedagogy based courses?
  22. 22. Quality is • Large and messy problems • Authentic tasks and assessment • Self, peer and teacher assessment • Group work and opportunities to develop leadership skills • Social presence
  23. 23. 2nd Generation Social Constructivist Pedagogy Summary • Not scalable, Expensive in terms of time and money • New group tools enhance efficiency • Helps teachers and learners transition to online learning
  24. 24. Generation 3 Connective pedagogies • Stephen Downes
  25. 25. Connectivist Knowledge • Is created by linking to appropriate people and objects • May be created and stored in non human devices • Is as much about capacity as current competence • Assumes the ubiquitous Internet • Is emergent George Siemens
  26. 26. Connectivism • “connectivism is the thesis that knowledge is distributed across a network of connections, and therefore that learning consists of the ability to construct and traverse those networks.” Stephen Downes 2007 See special issue of IRRODL.org
  27. 27. Connectivist Learning Persistence Accessibility Network Effects “Connectivying” your course http://terrya.edublogs.org/2012/12/18/connectivy-your-course/
  28. 28. NOT Learning in a Bubble
  29. 29. Disruptions of Connectivism • Demands net literacy and net presence of students and teachers • Openness is scary • New roles for teachers and students • Artifact ownership, persistence and privacy • Too manic for some
  30. 30. Connectivity Quality is • Building and sharing of artifacts • Developing and assessing new networks • Critically evaluating resources • Global activities and challenges
  31. 31. Quality Control needs to align with: • State Authority expectation • Pedagogical consistency • Teacher time • Need for innovation • Community of educators, parents and students within which it is imposed.
  32. 32. Three types of Quality Control Slide Credit – Int. Conf. on Quality Assurance in Higher Education in Africa, Windhoek, 2016 Enhancing quality and combating corruption in higher education: A global perspective Uvalić-Trumbić s. & Daniel J. http://sirjohn.ca/wordpress/wp-
  33. 33. Quality Systems
  34. 34. Quality Online Teaching and Learning – Is it really different than campus based education?
  35. 35. Terry Anderson terrya@athabascau.ca Blog: terrya.edublogs.org Your comments & questions most welcomed!

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