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Athabasca Universityoverview Jiangsu Open University, May 2017

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Slides I used to overview "Canada's Open University" to a faculty and staff at a LARGE open university in Nanqing China

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Athabasca Universityoverview Jiangsu Open University, May 2017

  1. 1. Athabasca University- Canada’s Open University May 21, 2107 Jiangsu Open University Terry Anderson Professor Emeritus, Athabasca University
  2. 2. Presentation overview • Introduction to Athabasca University • Course Production Process • Innovations at Athabasca • Your questions and comments
  3. 3. Mission Athabasca University, Canada’s Open University, is dedicated to the removal of barriers that restrict access to, and success in, university- level studies and to increasing equality of educational opportunity for adult learners worldwide. We are committed to excellence in teaching, research and scholarship, and to being of service to the general public. rededicated by Athabasca University Board of Governors October 21, 2011
  4. 4. History 1970 Established by Province (June 25, 1970) 1973-75 Pilot Project (First Course ‘World Ecology’ Opened in 1973) 1975 Approval in Principle 1978 Permanent Mandate 1984 Relocated to Athabasca
  5. 5. History 1992 Revised Mandate (Masters Programs) 2005 First Canadian university regionally accredited in U.S. 2006 EdD approved 2011 Academic & Research Centre opened 2014 Architecture Program opened
  6. 6. Size of Canada
  7. 7. Student Locations in Canada Athabasca University
  8. 8. Historic Enrolment Trends 0 5000 10000 15000 20000 25000 30000 35000 40000 45000 1990-91 1991-92 1992-93 1993-94 1994-95 1995-96 1996-97 1997-98 1998-99 1999-00 2000-01 2001-02 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16 Graduate Undergraduate
  9. 9. Registrations (3 credit equivalents) 56,519 66,023 66,414 68,624 67,759 67,682 7,834 9,617 9,936 9,931 10,020 10,425 0 10,000 20,000 30,000 40,000 50,000 60,000 70,000 80,000 90,000 Graduate Undergraduate
  10. 10. Undergraduate Age & Gender 2015-16 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 Under 25 25 to 34 35 to 44 45 to 64 65 + Female Male
  11. 11. Graduate Student Age & Gender 0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400 Under 25 25 to 34 35 to 44 45 to 64 65+ Female Male
  12. 12. Graduate Students by Discipline Faculty 2013/14 2014/15 2015/ 16 Business 865 834 911 Distance Ed 400 348 431 Health Disciplines 1,919 2,076 2,202 Hum. & Soc. Sciences 653 630 575 Science & Technology 254 238 252
  13. 13. Convocation – First time students meet each other (F2F) and their professors
  14. 14. Main Delivery System
  15. 15. Learner Support Student Support Centres Library Counselling Advising Services for Students with Disabilities Write Site / Math Site Academic support from Tutors – all with PhDs
  16. 16. Skills Acquired by Graduates Top Five % Bottom Five % Learn Independently 88% Speak in Public 27% Writing 81% Develop Math Skills 32% Work Independently 80% Resolve Conflicts 43% Analyze Information 80% Computer Skills 46% Research Skills 75% Interpersonal Skills 47% 2014 AET Graduate Outcomes
  17. 17. Staff Complement By Type 16% 3% 31% 21% 2% 22% 5% Academic Full Time Academic Part Time Part time Tutors & Markers Professional Management & Executive Support & Temporary Casual As of March 31, 2016 there were 1,163 employees. All full time academics expected to be active researchers!
  18. 18. Staff Complement By Location 36% 7% 2% 3% 1% 52% AU Athabasca AU Edmonton AU Calgary AU North Edmonton Partners Heritage Resource Management Working from Home
  19. 19. Revenue by Sources 30,113 44,125 46,940 43,182 44,994 46,424 43,563 61,871 63,207 64,757 64,989 65,952 - 20,000 40,000 60,000 80,000 100,000 120,000 140,000 $ thousands Other Sales Fees Gov't
  20. 20. Part 2 Course Development
  21. 21. Undergraduate Course Development Process Program Plan Evaluation Revision Course Plan Course Production Delivery Faculty Plan Open Courseware Principles: Learning  Quality  Timeliness  Flexibility Accountability Appropriate use of technology Design Policy
  22. 22. Course Team • Core Team – Subject Matter expert(s) – professors – Learning Designer • Added near end – Media staff – Editor – Peer reviewers
  23. 23. Course Development • Preparation & Design – 1. Assess all relevant information including Open Access Sourcs a. Review course evaluations b. Solicit input from instructors, tutors and learners c. Review other university offerings. Review course outcomes in relation to the overall program. Discuss course styles and ideas.
  24. 24. Course Development 2. Create course map • a. Measurable learning outcomes – i. Collecting measurable learning outcomes and assigning them to course units • b. Determine evaluation and assessment tools for the outcomes • c. Learning Activities for each unit • d. Content Topics Determine content needed for each outcome and unit. • e. Learning Materials • f. Team feedback and approval.
  25. 25. Course Development 3. Develop Unit 1 a. Team lead develops first unit based on the course map and standard requirements provided by the learning designer. 4. 20% presentation to interested faculty and instructors
  26. 26. Production • 5. Continue Unit Development – a. Incorporate feedback from team and interested faculty and develop several more units. • 6. Team Review – a. Team reviews units and the course map before approving continued development. • 7. Develop Remaining Units • 8. Editor Review • 9. Evaluation and Assessment Development a. Evaluation and Assessment development including all assignments and test instructions. • 10. 80% presentation
  27. 27. Online production • 11. Create Moodle Shell • a. Create unit web pages • b. Create media – i. Video and audio • c. Create graphics ii. Graphics, photos, animations • d. Copyright clearances • e. Create test items
  28. 28. Types of Course Development 1. Major development • change course title, course aims, course description, learning outcomes / learning objectives / competencies • redesign course structure and assessment • substantially change the Study Guide (text, images, figures, tables, multimedia, interactivity, etc.) and Course Orientation • transfer course from one media format to another (e.g., print to online, desktop to mobile, etc.)
  29. 29. Types of Course Development 2. Minor development • change questions in assessment: quizzes, assignments, Lab or projects • insert new required readings in some units • for new edition of textbook or eText: change references to a new edition of the same textbook or eText in study guide.
  30. 30. Types of Course Development 3. Maintenance • correct typos, grammar, broken links. • rewording, clarification, or elaboration • add or delete items in Supplementary Materials • replace exam without affecting marking scheme (Note: Exam unit must be involved) • open a paced course in a new semester but does not require any changes to the content or layout
  31. 31. Final Testing • User testing • Final proofing • Syllabus update
  32. 32. Part 3. Innovations At Athabasca • Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition (PLAR) • see Conrad, D. (2008). Situating Prior learning assessment and recognition (Plar) in an online learning environment. The theory and practice of online learning, 75. Free online Course on PLAR for Educators
  33. 33. Innovations At Athabasca • AU Press – AUPRESS.CA • Canada’s First Open Access Press • Books in Paper for $$ or downloaded for free.
  34. 34. Continuous Enrollment • Students enroll whenever they want • Have 6 months to complete course • Arrange to write test at a learning centre when they chose • More freedom and flexibility for students • Attracts students enrolled in conventional universities • Higher drop our rate • No summer holidays for teachers/tutors
  35. 35. Doctoral Programs -not PHD Designed for those who will likely not be researchers or university professors. Designed to help practitioners make a major, research-orientated contribution to a profession.
  36. 36. From Tutor support (old model) to Call Centre Slide from D. Annand
  37. 37. Advantages of Call Centre Model Tutors paid by work done- not for waiting for student Interaction results cost savings to the University.
  38. 38. Home lab kits for Science Courses
  39. 39. IRRODL • Most widely Cited and widely read Distance Education Journal in the World • Only Open Access and SSCI Journal in Distance Education • Readers, reviewers and contributors needed • Irrodl.org
  40. 40. Social Network to Create Community
  41. 41. Challenges facing Athabasca • Decreasing government funding • Staff effective use of new technologies and new pedagogies • Increased pressure to research. • New competition from traditional universities (1 in 4 students takes at least one fully online course)
  42. 42. Terry Anderson terrya@athabascau.ca Blog: virtualcanuck.ca Your comments & questions most welcomed!

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