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OPERATING SYTEMS
           B.Tech CSE IIIyr Isem
    2012-2013
                         By
     Mr. G Prabhakar Raju


unit1               OS             1
Text Books:
1.Operating System Concepts- Abraham
  Silberchatz, Peter B. Galvin, Greg Gagne
  7th Edition, John Wiley
2.Operating systems- A Concept based
  Approach-D.M. Dhamdhere, 2nd Edition,
  TMH.

unit1                OS                      2
Lecture Plan UNIT-I
Lecture Topic                                 Slide
No.                                           No.
1           Overview of computer OS           4-11
2           OS functions                      12-24
3           protection and security           25-26
4           distributed systems               27-29
5           Special purpose systems           30-37
6           OS structures and systems calls   38-45
7           OS generation                     46-64
8           REVISION

    unit1                      OS                    3
What is an Operating System?
• A program that acts as an intermediary
  between a user of a computer and the
  computer hardware
• Operating system goals:
  – Execute user programs and make solving user
    problems easier
  – Make the computer system convenient to use
  – Use the computer hardware in an efficient manner


  unit1                  OS                       4
Operating System Definition
• OS is a resource allocator
   – Manages all resources
   – Decides between conflicting requests for efficient and fair
     resource use
• OS is a control program
   – Controls execution of programs to prevent errors and improper
     use of the computer
• No universally accepted definition
• “Everything a vendor ships when you order an operating system” is
  good approximation
   – But varies wildly
• “The one program running at all times on the computer” is the
  kernel. Everything else is either a system program (ships with the
  operating system) or an application program
   unit1                          OS                              5
Computer System Organization
• Computer-system operation
  – One or more CPUs, device controllers connect through
    common bus providing access to shared memory
  – Concurrent execution of CPUs and devices competing for
    memory cycles




  unit1                      OS                          6
Computer-System Operation
• I/O devices and the CPU can execute
  concurrently
• Each device controller is in charge of a
  particular device type
• Each device controller has a local buffer
• CPU moves data from/to main memory to/from
  local buffers
• I/O is from the device to local buffer of
  controller
• Device controller informs CPU that it has
   unit1                  OS                     7

  finished its operation by causing an interrupt
I/O Structure
• After I/O starts, control returns to user program only upon I/O
  completion
   – Wait instruction idles the CPU until the next interrupt
   – Wait loop (contention for memory access)
   – At most one I/O request is outstanding at a time, no
      simultaneous I/O processing
• After I/O starts, control returns to user program without waiting
  for I/O completion
   – System call – request to the operating system to allow user
      to wait for I/O completion
   – Device-status table contains entry for each I/O device
      indicating its type, address, and state
   – Operating system indexes into I/O device table to determine
      device status and to modify table entry to include interrupt

   unit1                         OS                            8
Storage Structure
• Main memory – only large storage media that
  the CPU can access directly
• Secondary storage – extension of main
  memory that provides large nonvolatile storage
  capacity
• Magnetic disks – rigid metal or glass platters
  covered with magnetic recording material
  – Disk surface is logically divided into tracks, which
    are subdivided into sectors
  – The disk controller determines the logical
    interaction between the device and the computer
  unit1                    OS                         9
Storage Hierarchy
•   Storage systems organized in hierarchy
     – Speed
     – Cost
     – Volatility
•   Caching – copying information into faster storage system; main memory
    can be viewed as a last cache for secondary storage




    unit1                            OS                                10
Caching
• Important principle, performed at many levels in a computer (in
  hardware, operating system, software)
• Information in use copied from slower to faster storage
  temporarily
• Faster storage (cache) checked first to determine if information
  is there
   – If it is, information used directly from the cache (fast)
   – If not, data copied to cache and used there
• Cache smaller than storage being cached
   – Cache management important design problem
   – Cache size and replacement policy


   unit1                        OS                            11
Symmetric Multiprocessing Architecture




                 A Dual-Core Design




unit1                    OS                      12
Operating-System Operations
• Interrupt driven by hardware
• Software error or request creates exception or trap
   – Division by zero, request for operating system service
• Other process problems include infinite loop, processes modifying
  each other or the operating system
• Dual-mode operation allows OS to protect itself and other system
  components
   – User mode and kernel mode
   – Mode bit provided by hardware
       • Provides ability to distinguish when system is running user
         code or kernel code
       • Some instructions designated as privileged, only executable in
         kernel mode
       • System call changes mode to kernel, return from call resets it
         to user

   unit1                          OS                              13
Transition from User to Kernel Mode


• Timer to prevent infinite loop / process
  hogging resources
        – Set interrupt after specific period
        – Operating system decrements counter
        – When counter zero generate an interrupt
        – Set up before scheduling process to regain
          control or terminate program that exceeds
          allotted time

unit1                        OS                        14
Process Management
A process is a program in execution. It is a unit of work within the
   system. Program is a passive entity, process is an active entity.
• Process needs resources to accomplish its task
    – CPU, memory, I/O, files
    – Initialization data
• Process termination requires reclaim of any reusable resources
• Single-threaded process has one program counter specifying
   location of next instruction to execute
    – Process executes instructions sequentially, one at a time, until
      completion
• Multi-threaded process has one program counter per thread
• Typically system has many processes, some user, some
   operating system running concurrently on one or more CPUs
    – Concurrency by multiplexing the CPUs among the processes /
      threads

 unit1                            OS                               15
Process Management Activities
The operating system is responsible for the following
  activities in connection with process management:
• Creating and deleting both user and system
  processes
• Suspending and resuming processes
• Providing mechanisms for process synchronization
• Providing mechanisms for process communication
• Providing mechanisms for deadlock handling


  unit1                  OS                      16
Memory Management
• All data in memory before and after processing
• All instructions in memory in order to execute
• Memory management determines what is in memory when
   – Optimizing CPU utilization and computer response to users
• Memory management activities
   – Keeping track of which parts of memory are currently being
      used and by whom
   – Deciding which processes (or parts thereof) and data to
      move into and out of memory
   – Allocating and deallocating memory space as needed




   unit1                       OS                           17
Storage Management
• OS provides uniform, logical view of information storage
   – Abstracts physical properties to logical storage unit - file
   – Each medium is controlled by device (i.e., disk drive, tape drive)
       • Varying properties include access speed, capacity, data-
         transfer rate, access method (sequential or random)
• File-System management
   – Files usually organized into directories
   – Access control on most systems to determine who can access
      what
   – OS activities include
       • Creating and deleting files and directories
       • Primitives to manipulate files and dirs
       • Mapping files onto secondary storage
       • Backup files onto stable (non-volatile) storage media

   unit1                           OS                               18
Mass-Storage Management
• Usually disks used to store data that does not fit in main memory or
  data that must be kept for a “long” period of time
• Proper management is of central importance
• Entire speed of computer operation hinges on disk subsystem and
  its algorithms
• OS activities
    – Free-space management
    – Storage allocation
    – Disk scheduling
• Some storage need not be fast
    – Tertiary storage includes optical storage, magnetic tape
    – Still must be managed
    – Varies between WORM (write-once, read-many-times) and RW
      (read-write)
   unit1                           OS                              19
Performance of Various Levels of Storage


• Movement between levels of storage
  hierarchy can be explicit or implicit




unit1                   OS                         20
Migration of Integer A from Disk to Register


• Multitasking environments must be careful to use most
  recent value, no matter where it is stored in the storage
  hierarchy
  Multiprocessor environment must provide cache
  coherency in hardware such that all CPUs have the most
  recent value in their cache
• Distributed environment situation even more complex
   – Several copies of a datum can exist




unit1                       OS                           21
Protection and Security
• Protection – any mechanism for controlling access of
  processes or users to resources defined by the OS

• Security – defense of the system against internal and
  external attacks

  – Huge range, including denial-of-service, worms,
    viruses, identity theft, theft of service




  unit1                    OS                         22
Protection and Security
• Systems generally first distinguish among users,
  to determine who can do what
   – User identities (user IDs, security IDs) include
     name and associated number, one per user
   – User ID then associated with all files,
     processes of that user to determine access
     control
   – Group identifier (group ID) allows set of users
     to be defined and controls managed, then also
     associated with each process, file
   – Privilege escalation allows user to change to
     effective ID with more rights
  unit1                   OS                     23
Distributed Systems
• Traditional computer
   – Blurring over time
   – Office environment
      • PCs connected to a network, terminals attached to mainframe or
        minicomputers providing batch and timesharing
      • Now portals allowing networked and remote systems access to
        same resources
   – Home networks
      • Used to be single system, then modems
      • Now firewalled, networked
• Client-Server Computing
   – Dumb terminals supplanted by smart PCs
   – Many systems now servers, responding to requests
     generated by clients
        • Compute-server provides an interface to client to request services
   unit1 (i.e. database)               OS                                      24
        • File-server provides interface for clients to store and retrieve files
Peer-to-Peer Computing
• Another model of distributed system
• P2P does not distinguish clients and servers
  – Instead all nodes are considered peers
  – May each act as client, server or both
  – Node must join P2P network
     • Registers its service with central lookup
       service on network, or
     • Broadcast request for service and respond to
       requests for service via discovery protocol
  – Examples include Napster and Gnutella

 unit1                    OS                      25
Web-Based Computing
• Web has become ubiquitous
• PCs most prevalent devices
• More devices becoming networked to allow web
  access
• New category of devices to manage web traffic
  among similar servers: load balancers
• Use of operating systems like Windows 95,
  client-side, have evolved into Linux and
  Windows XP, which can be clients and servers


unit1                  OS                         26
Operating System Structure
Multiprogramming needed for efficiency
   – Single user cannot keep CPU and I/O devices busy at all times
   – Multiprogramming organizes jobs (code and data) so CPU always has
      one to execute
   – A subset of total jobs in system is kept in memory
   – One job selected and run via job scheduling.


•   Timesharing (multitasking) is logical extension in which CPU switches
    jobs so frequently that users can interact with each job while it is running,
    creating interactive computing
     – Response time should be < 1 second
     – If several jobs ready to run at the same time  CPU scheduling
     – If processes don’t fit in memory, swapping moves them in and out to run
     – Virtual memory allows execution of processes not completely in
       memory

     unit1                             OS                                  27
Operating System Services
• One set of operating-system services provides functions that
  are helpful to the user:
   – Program execution - The system must be able to load a
       program into memory and to run that program, end
       execution, either normally or abnormally (indicating error)
   – I/O operations - A running program may require I/O, which
       may involve a file or an I/O device
   – File-system manipulation - The file system is of particular
       interest. Obviously, programs need to read and write files
       and directories, create and delete them, search them, list file
       Information, permission management.
   – User interface - Almost all operating systems have a user
       interface (UI)
   unit1
         • Varies between Command-Line (CLI), Graphics User Interface
                                   OS                            28
       (GUI), Batch
A View of Operating System Services




unit1                 OS                      29
Operating System Services
• One set of operating-system services provides functions that are
  helpful to the user (Cont):
   – Communications – Processes may exchange information, on
     the same computer or between computers over a network
      • Communications may be via shared memory or through
        message passing (packets moved by the OS)
   – Error detection – OS needs to be constantly aware of possible
     errors
      • May occur in the CPU and memory hardware, in I/O devices,
        in user program
      • For each type of error, OS should take the appropriate action
        to ensure correct and consistent computing
      • Debugging facilities can greatly enhance the user’s and
        programmer’s abilities to efficiently use the system
   unit1                          OS                              30
Operating System Services
•   Another set of OS functions exists for ensuring the efficient operation of the system
    itself via resource sharing
      – Resource allocation - When multiple users or multiple jobs running
         concurrently, resources must be allocated to each of them
           • Many types of resources - Some (such as CPU cycles, main memory, and
             file storage) may have special allocation code, others (such as I/O devices)
             may have general request and release code
      – Accounting - To keep track of which users use how much and what kinds of
         computer resources
      – Protection and security - The owners of information stored in a multiuser or
         networked computer system may want to control use of that information,
         concurrent processes should not interfere with each other
           • Protection involves ensuring that all access to system resources is
             controlled
           • Security of the system from outsiders requires user authentication, extends
             to defending external I/O devices from invalid access attempts
           • If a system is to be protected and secure, precautions must be instituted
             throughout it. A chain is only as strong as its weakest link.


    unit1                                  OS                                      31
User Operating System Interface - CLI

   Command Line Interface (CLI) or
    command interpreter allows direct
    command entry
        • Sometimes implemented in kernel,
          sometimes by systems program
        • Sometimes multiple flavors implemented –
          shells
        • Primarily fetches a command from user and
          executes it
          – Sometimes commands built-in, sometimes just
            names of programs
             » If the latter, adding new features doesn’t require
unit1                             OS                                32
               shell modification
User Operating System Interface - GUI


• User-friendly desktop metaphor interface
   – Usually mouse, keyboard, and monitor
   – Icons represent files, programs, actions, etc
   – Various mouse buttons over objects in the interface
     cause various actions (provide information, options,
     execute function, open directory (known as a folder)
   – Invented at Xerox PARC
• Many systems now include both CLI and GUI
  interfaces
      – Microsoft Windows is GUI with CLI “command” shell
unit1
      – Apple Mac OS X as “Aqua” GUI interface with UNIX
                              OS                            33
        kernel underneath and shells available
Bourne Shell Command Interpreter




unit1                  OS                  34
The Mac OS X GUI




unit1          OS          35
System Calls
• Programming interface to the services provided by the OS
• Typically written in a high-level language (C or C++)
• Mostly accessed by programs via a high-level Application Program
  Interface (API) rather than direct system call use
• Three most common APIs are Win32 API for Windows, POSIX API
  for POSIX-based systems (including virtually all versions of UNIX,
  Linux, and Mac OS X), and Java API for the Java virtual machine
  (JVM)
• Why use APIs rather than system calls?


  (Note that the system-call names used throughout this text are
  generic)



  unit1                          OS                                36
Example of System Calls
• System call sequence to copy the
  contents of one file to another file




unit1                  OS                37
Example of Standard API
•   Consider the ReadFile() function in the
•   Win32 API—a function for reading from a file
    A description of the parameters passed to ReadFile()
     – HANDLE file—the file to be read
     – LPVOID buffer—a buffer where the data will be read into and written
       from
     – DWORD bytesToRead—the number of bytes to be read into the buffer
     – LPDWORD bytesRead—the number of bytes read during the last read
     – LPOVERLAPPED ovl—indicates if overlapped I/O is being used




    unit1                            OS                                38
System Call Implementation
• Typically, a number associated with each system call
   – System-call interface maintains a table indexed according to these
     numbers
• The system call interface invokes intended system call in OS kernel
  and returns status of the system call and any return values
• The caller need know nothing about how the system call is
  implemented
   – Just needs to obey API and understand what OS will do as a
     result call
   – Most details of OS interface hidden from programmer by API
      • Managed by run-time support library (set of functions built into
        libraries included with compiler)


   unit1                           OS                             39
API – System Call – OS Relationship




unit1                 OS                      40
Standard C Library Example
• C program invoking printf() library call, which
  calls write() system call




  unit1                  OS                     41
System Call Parameter Passing
• Often, more information is required than simply identity of desired
  system call
   – Exact type and amount of information vary according to OS and
     call
• Three general methods used to pass parameters to the OS
   – Simplest: pass the parameters in registers
      • In some cases, may be more parameters than registers
   – Parameters stored in a block, or table, in memory, and address of
     block passed as a parameter in a register
      • This approach taken by Linux and Solaris
   – Parameters placed, or pushed, onto the stack by the program and
     popped off the stack by the operating system
   – Block and stack methods do not limit the number or length of
     parameters being passed

   unit1                          OS                             42
Parameter Passing via Table




unit1                OS               43
Types of System Calls
•   Process control
•   File management
•   Device management
•   Information maintenance
•   Communications
•   Protection


unit1                 OS        44
Examples of Windows and Unix System Calls




unit1                   OS                     45
MS-DOS execution




        (a) At system startup (b) running a program

unit1                       OS                        46
FreeBSD Running Multiple Programs




unit1                OS                     47
System Programs
• System programs provide a convenient environment for
  program development and execution. The can be divided
  into:
   – File manipulation
   – Status information
   – File modification
   – Programming language support
   – Program loading and execution
   – Communications
   – Application programs
• Most users’ view of the operation system is defined by
  system programs, not the actual system calls
  unit1                    OS                       48
System Programs
• Provide a convenient environment for program development and
  execution
    – Some of them are simply user interfaces to system calls;
        others are considerably more complex
• File management - Create, delete, copy, rename, print, dump,
  list, and generally manipulate files and directories
• Status information
    – Some ask the system for info - date, time, amount of
        available memory, disk space, number of users
    – Others provide detailed performance, logging, and debugging
        information
    – Typically, these programs format and print the output to the
        terminal or other output devices
    – Some systems implement a registry - used to store and
  unit1
        retrieve configuration information
                                     OS                            49
System Programs
• File modification
   – Text editors to create and modify files
   – Special commands to search contents of files or perform
       transformations of the text
• Programming-language support - Compilers, assemblers,
  debuggers and interpreters sometimes provided
• Program loading and execution- Absolute loaders,
  relocatable loaders, linkage editors, and overlay-loaders,
  debugging systems for higher-level and machine language
• Communications - Provide the mechanism for creating
  virtual connections among processes, users, and computer
  systems
   – Allow users to send messages to one another’s screens,
       browse web pages, send electronic-mail messages, log
       in remotely, transfer files from one machine to another 50
   unit1                             OS
Operating System Design and Implementation
• Design and Implementation of OS not “solvable”, but some
  approaches have proven successful
• Internal structure of different Operating Systems can vary
  widely
• Start by defining goals and specifications
• Affected by choice of hardware, type of system
• User goals and System goals
   – User goals – operating system should be convenient to
     use, easy to learn, reliable, safe, and fast
   – System goals – operating system should be easy to
     design, implement, and maintain, as well as flexible,
     reliable, error-free, and efficient
   unit1                      OS                          51
Operating System Design and Implementation

• Important principle to separate
  Policy: What will be done?
  Mechanism: How to do it?
• Mechanisms determine how to do something,
  policies decide what will be done
  – The separation of policy from mechanism is a very
    important principle, it allows maximum flexibility if policy
    decisions are to be changed later




 unit1                         OS                              52
Simple Structure
• MS-DOS – written to provide the most
  functionality in the least space
        – Not divided into modules
        – Although MS-DOS has some structure, its
          interfaces and levels of functionality are not
          well separated




unit1                          OS                          53
MS-DOS Layer Structure




unit1             OS             54
Layered Approach
• The operating system is divided into a
  number of layers (levels), each built on top
  of lower layers. The bottom layer (layer
  0), is the hardware; the highest (layer N) is
  the user interface.
• With modularity, layers are selected such
  that each uses functions (operations) and
  services of only lower-level layers

unit1                 OS                      55
Traditional UNIX System Structure




unit1                 OS                    56
UNIX
   • UNIX – limited by hardware functionality, the original UNIX
     operating system had limited structuring. The UNIX OS
     consists of two separable parts
      – Systems programs
      – The kernel
         • Consists of everything below the system-call interface
           and above the physical hardware
         • Provides the file system, CPU scheduling, memory
           management, and other operating-system functions; a
           large number of functions for one level




unit1                             OS                                57
Layered Operating System




unit1              OS              58
Microkernel System Structure
•   Moves as much from the kernel into “user” space
•   Communication takes place between user modules using message
    passing
•   Benefits:
     – Easier to extend a microkernel
     – Easier to port the operating system to new architectures
     – More reliable (less code is running in kernel mode)
     – More secure
•   Detriments:
     – Performance overhead of user space to kernel space
       communication


unit1                           OS                             59
Mac OS X Structure




unit1           OS           60
Modules
• Most modern operating systems
  implement kernel modules
        – Uses object-oriented approach
        – Each core component is separate
        – Each talks to the others over known interfaces
        – Each is loadable as needed within the kernel
• Overall, similar to layers but with more
  flexible
unit1                        OS                       61
Solaris Modular Approach




unit1              OS              62
Operating System Generation
• Operating systems are designed to run on any of a
  class of machines; the system must be configured
  for each specific computer site
• SYSGEN program obtains information concerning
  the specific configuration of the hardware system
• Booting – starting a computer by loading the kernel
• Bootstrap program – code stored in ROM that is able
  to locate the kernel, load it into memory, and start its
  execution



   unit1                     OS                        63
System Boot
• Operating system must be made available to
  hardware so hardware can start it
  – Small piece of code – bootstrap loader, locates
    the kernel, loads it into memory, and starts it
  – Sometimes two-step process where boot block at
    fixed location loads bootstrap loader
  – When power initialized on system, execution starts
    at a fixed memory location
          • Firmware used to hold initial boot code


  unit1                             OS                64

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OS Functions and Services

  • 1. OPERATING SYTEMS B.Tech CSE IIIyr Isem 2012-2013 By Mr. G Prabhakar Raju unit1 OS 1
  • 2. Text Books: 1.Operating System Concepts- Abraham Silberchatz, Peter B. Galvin, Greg Gagne 7th Edition, John Wiley 2.Operating systems- A Concept based Approach-D.M. Dhamdhere, 2nd Edition, TMH. unit1 OS 2
  • 3. Lecture Plan UNIT-I Lecture Topic Slide No. No. 1 Overview of computer OS 4-11 2 OS functions 12-24 3 protection and security 25-26 4 distributed systems 27-29 5 Special purpose systems 30-37 6 OS structures and systems calls 38-45 7 OS generation 46-64 8 REVISION unit1 OS 3
  • 4. What is an Operating System? • A program that acts as an intermediary between a user of a computer and the computer hardware • Operating system goals: – Execute user programs and make solving user problems easier – Make the computer system convenient to use – Use the computer hardware in an efficient manner unit1 OS 4
  • 5. Operating System Definition • OS is a resource allocator – Manages all resources – Decides between conflicting requests for efficient and fair resource use • OS is a control program – Controls execution of programs to prevent errors and improper use of the computer • No universally accepted definition • “Everything a vendor ships when you order an operating system” is good approximation – But varies wildly • “The one program running at all times on the computer” is the kernel. Everything else is either a system program (ships with the operating system) or an application program unit1 OS 5
  • 6. Computer System Organization • Computer-system operation – One or more CPUs, device controllers connect through common bus providing access to shared memory – Concurrent execution of CPUs and devices competing for memory cycles unit1 OS 6
  • 7. Computer-System Operation • I/O devices and the CPU can execute concurrently • Each device controller is in charge of a particular device type • Each device controller has a local buffer • CPU moves data from/to main memory to/from local buffers • I/O is from the device to local buffer of controller • Device controller informs CPU that it has unit1 OS 7 finished its operation by causing an interrupt
  • 8. I/O Structure • After I/O starts, control returns to user program only upon I/O completion – Wait instruction idles the CPU until the next interrupt – Wait loop (contention for memory access) – At most one I/O request is outstanding at a time, no simultaneous I/O processing • After I/O starts, control returns to user program without waiting for I/O completion – System call – request to the operating system to allow user to wait for I/O completion – Device-status table contains entry for each I/O device indicating its type, address, and state – Operating system indexes into I/O device table to determine device status and to modify table entry to include interrupt unit1 OS 8
  • 9. Storage Structure • Main memory – only large storage media that the CPU can access directly • Secondary storage – extension of main memory that provides large nonvolatile storage capacity • Magnetic disks – rigid metal or glass platters covered with magnetic recording material – Disk surface is logically divided into tracks, which are subdivided into sectors – The disk controller determines the logical interaction between the device and the computer unit1 OS 9
  • 10. Storage Hierarchy • Storage systems organized in hierarchy – Speed – Cost – Volatility • Caching – copying information into faster storage system; main memory can be viewed as a last cache for secondary storage unit1 OS 10
  • 11. Caching • Important principle, performed at many levels in a computer (in hardware, operating system, software) • Information in use copied from slower to faster storage temporarily • Faster storage (cache) checked first to determine if information is there – If it is, information used directly from the cache (fast) – If not, data copied to cache and used there • Cache smaller than storage being cached – Cache management important design problem – Cache size and replacement policy unit1 OS 11
  • 12. Symmetric Multiprocessing Architecture A Dual-Core Design unit1 OS 12
  • 13. Operating-System Operations • Interrupt driven by hardware • Software error or request creates exception or trap – Division by zero, request for operating system service • Other process problems include infinite loop, processes modifying each other or the operating system • Dual-mode operation allows OS to protect itself and other system components – User mode and kernel mode – Mode bit provided by hardware • Provides ability to distinguish when system is running user code or kernel code • Some instructions designated as privileged, only executable in kernel mode • System call changes mode to kernel, return from call resets it to user unit1 OS 13
  • 14. Transition from User to Kernel Mode • Timer to prevent infinite loop / process hogging resources – Set interrupt after specific period – Operating system decrements counter – When counter zero generate an interrupt – Set up before scheduling process to regain control or terminate program that exceeds allotted time unit1 OS 14
  • 15. Process Management A process is a program in execution. It is a unit of work within the system. Program is a passive entity, process is an active entity. • Process needs resources to accomplish its task – CPU, memory, I/O, files – Initialization data • Process termination requires reclaim of any reusable resources • Single-threaded process has one program counter specifying location of next instruction to execute – Process executes instructions sequentially, one at a time, until completion • Multi-threaded process has one program counter per thread • Typically system has many processes, some user, some operating system running concurrently on one or more CPUs – Concurrency by multiplexing the CPUs among the processes / threads unit1 OS 15
  • 16. Process Management Activities The operating system is responsible for the following activities in connection with process management: • Creating and deleting both user and system processes • Suspending and resuming processes • Providing mechanisms for process synchronization • Providing mechanisms for process communication • Providing mechanisms for deadlock handling unit1 OS 16
  • 17. Memory Management • All data in memory before and after processing • All instructions in memory in order to execute • Memory management determines what is in memory when – Optimizing CPU utilization and computer response to users • Memory management activities – Keeping track of which parts of memory are currently being used and by whom – Deciding which processes (or parts thereof) and data to move into and out of memory – Allocating and deallocating memory space as needed unit1 OS 17
  • 18. Storage Management • OS provides uniform, logical view of information storage – Abstracts physical properties to logical storage unit - file – Each medium is controlled by device (i.e., disk drive, tape drive) • Varying properties include access speed, capacity, data- transfer rate, access method (sequential or random) • File-System management – Files usually organized into directories – Access control on most systems to determine who can access what – OS activities include • Creating and deleting files and directories • Primitives to manipulate files and dirs • Mapping files onto secondary storage • Backup files onto stable (non-volatile) storage media unit1 OS 18
  • 19. Mass-Storage Management • Usually disks used to store data that does not fit in main memory or data that must be kept for a “long” period of time • Proper management is of central importance • Entire speed of computer operation hinges on disk subsystem and its algorithms • OS activities – Free-space management – Storage allocation – Disk scheduling • Some storage need not be fast – Tertiary storage includes optical storage, magnetic tape – Still must be managed – Varies between WORM (write-once, read-many-times) and RW (read-write) unit1 OS 19
  • 20. Performance of Various Levels of Storage • Movement between levels of storage hierarchy can be explicit or implicit unit1 OS 20
  • 21. Migration of Integer A from Disk to Register • Multitasking environments must be careful to use most recent value, no matter where it is stored in the storage hierarchy Multiprocessor environment must provide cache coherency in hardware such that all CPUs have the most recent value in their cache • Distributed environment situation even more complex – Several copies of a datum can exist unit1 OS 21
  • 22. Protection and Security • Protection – any mechanism for controlling access of processes or users to resources defined by the OS • Security – defense of the system against internal and external attacks – Huge range, including denial-of-service, worms, viruses, identity theft, theft of service unit1 OS 22
  • 23. Protection and Security • Systems generally first distinguish among users, to determine who can do what – User identities (user IDs, security IDs) include name and associated number, one per user – User ID then associated with all files, processes of that user to determine access control – Group identifier (group ID) allows set of users to be defined and controls managed, then also associated with each process, file – Privilege escalation allows user to change to effective ID with more rights unit1 OS 23
  • 24. Distributed Systems • Traditional computer – Blurring over time – Office environment • PCs connected to a network, terminals attached to mainframe or minicomputers providing batch and timesharing • Now portals allowing networked and remote systems access to same resources – Home networks • Used to be single system, then modems • Now firewalled, networked • Client-Server Computing – Dumb terminals supplanted by smart PCs – Many systems now servers, responding to requests generated by clients • Compute-server provides an interface to client to request services unit1 (i.e. database) OS 24 • File-server provides interface for clients to store and retrieve files
  • 25. Peer-to-Peer Computing • Another model of distributed system • P2P does not distinguish clients and servers – Instead all nodes are considered peers – May each act as client, server or both – Node must join P2P network • Registers its service with central lookup service on network, or • Broadcast request for service and respond to requests for service via discovery protocol – Examples include Napster and Gnutella unit1 OS 25
  • 26. Web-Based Computing • Web has become ubiquitous • PCs most prevalent devices • More devices becoming networked to allow web access • New category of devices to manage web traffic among similar servers: load balancers • Use of operating systems like Windows 95, client-side, have evolved into Linux and Windows XP, which can be clients and servers unit1 OS 26
  • 27. Operating System Structure Multiprogramming needed for efficiency – Single user cannot keep CPU and I/O devices busy at all times – Multiprogramming organizes jobs (code and data) so CPU always has one to execute – A subset of total jobs in system is kept in memory – One job selected and run via job scheduling. • Timesharing (multitasking) is logical extension in which CPU switches jobs so frequently that users can interact with each job while it is running, creating interactive computing – Response time should be < 1 second – If several jobs ready to run at the same time  CPU scheduling – If processes don’t fit in memory, swapping moves them in and out to run – Virtual memory allows execution of processes not completely in memory unit1 OS 27
  • 28. Operating System Services • One set of operating-system services provides functions that are helpful to the user: – Program execution - The system must be able to load a program into memory and to run that program, end execution, either normally or abnormally (indicating error) – I/O operations - A running program may require I/O, which may involve a file or an I/O device – File-system manipulation - The file system is of particular interest. Obviously, programs need to read and write files and directories, create and delete them, search them, list file Information, permission management. – User interface - Almost all operating systems have a user interface (UI) unit1 • Varies between Command-Line (CLI), Graphics User Interface OS 28 (GUI), Batch
  • 29. A View of Operating System Services unit1 OS 29
  • 30. Operating System Services • One set of operating-system services provides functions that are helpful to the user (Cont): – Communications – Processes may exchange information, on the same computer or between computers over a network • Communications may be via shared memory or through message passing (packets moved by the OS) – Error detection – OS needs to be constantly aware of possible errors • May occur in the CPU and memory hardware, in I/O devices, in user program • For each type of error, OS should take the appropriate action to ensure correct and consistent computing • Debugging facilities can greatly enhance the user’s and programmer’s abilities to efficiently use the system unit1 OS 30
  • 31. Operating System Services • Another set of OS functions exists for ensuring the efficient operation of the system itself via resource sharing – Resource allocation - When multiple users or multiple jobs running concurrently, resources must be allocated to each of them • Many types of resources - Some (such as CPU cycles, main memory, and file storage) may have special allocation code, others (such as I/O devices) may have general request and release code – Accounting - To keep track of which users use how much and what kinds of computer resources – Protection and security - The owners of information stored in a multiuser or networked computer system may want to control use of that information, concurrent processes should not interfere with each other • Protection involves ensuring that all access to system resources is controlled • Security of the system from outsiders requires user authentication, extends to defending external I/O devices from invalid access attempts • If a system is to be protected and secure, precautions must be instituted throughout it. A chain is only as strong as its weakest link. unit1 OS 31
  • 32. User Operating System Interface - CLI Command Line Interface (CLI) or command interpreter allows direct command entry • Sometimes implemented in kernel, sometimes by systems program • Sometimes multiple flavors implemented – shells • Primarily fetches a command from user and executes it – Sometimes commands built-in, sometimes just names of programs » If the latter, adding new features doesn’t require unit1 OS 32 shell modification
  • 33. User Operating System Interface - GUI • User-friendly desktop metaphor interface – Usually mouse, keyboard, and monitor – Icons represent files, programs, actions, etc – Various mouse buttons over objects in the interface cause various actions (provide information, options, execute function, open directory (known as a folder) – Invented at Xerox PARC • Many systems now include both CLI and GUI interfaces – Microsoft Windows is GUI with CLI “command” shell unit1 – Apple Mac OS X as “Aqua” GUI interface with UNIX OS 33 kernel underneath and shells available
  • 34. Bourne Shell Command Interpreter unit1 OS 34
  • 35. The Mac OS X GUI unit1 OS 35
  • 36. System Calls • Programming interface to the services provided by the OS • Typically written in a high-level language (C or C++) • Mostly accessed by programs via a high-level Application Program Interface (API) rather than direct system call use • Three most common APIs are Win32 API for Windows, POSIX API for POSIX-based systems (including virtually all versions of UNIX, Linux, and Mac OS X), and Java API for the Java virtual machine (JVM) • Why use APIs rather than system calls? (Note that the system-call names used throughout this text are generic) unit1 OS 36
  • 37. Example of System Calls • System call sequence to copy the contents of one file to another file unit1 OS 37
  • 38. Example of Standard API • Consider the ReadFile() function in the • Win32 API—a function for reading from a file A description of the parameters passed to ReadFile() – HANDLE file—the file to be read – LPVOID buffer—a buffer where the data will be read into and written from – DWORD bytesToRead—the number of bytes to be read into the buffer – LPDWORD bytesRead—the number of bytes read during the last read – LPOVERLAPPED ovl—indicates if overlapped I/O is being used unit1 OS 38
  • 39. System Call Implementation • Typically, a number associated with each system call – System-call interface maintains a table indexed according to these numbers • The system call interface invokes intended system call in OS kernel and returns status of the system call and any return values • The caller need know nothing about how the system call is implemented – Just needs to obey API and understand what OS will do as a result call – Most details of OS interface hidden from programmer by API • Managed by run-time support library (set of functions built into libraries included with compiler) unit1 OS 39
  • 40. API – System Call – OS Relationship unit1 OS 40
  • 41. Standard C Library Example • C program invoking printf() library call, which calls write() system call unit1 OS 41
  • 42. System Call Parameter Passing • Often, more information is required than simply identity of desired system call – Exact type and amount of information vary according to OS and call • Three general methods used to pass parameters to the OS – Simplest: pass the parameters in registers • In some cases, may be more parameters than registers – Parameters stored in a block, or table, in memory, and address of block passed as a parameter in a register • This approach taken by Linux and Solaris – Parameters placed, or pushed, onto the stack by the program and popped off the stack by the operating system – Block and stack methods do not limit the number or length of parameters being passed unit1 OS 42
  • 43. Parameter Passing via Table unit1 OS 43
  • 44. Types of System Calls • Process control • File management • Device management • Information maintenance • Communications • Protection unit1 OS 44
  • 45. Examples of Windows and Unix System Calls unit1 OS 45
  • 46. MS-DOS execution (a) At system startup (b) running a program unit1 OS 46
  • 47. FreeBSD Running Multiple Programs unit1 OS 47
  • 48. System Programs • System programs provide a convenient environment for program development and execution. The can be divided into: – File manipulation – Status information – File modification – Programming language support – Program loading and execution – Communications – Application programs • Most users’ view of the operation system is defined by system programs, not the actual system calls unit1 OS 48
  • 49. System Programs • Provide a convenient environment for program development and execution – Some of them are simply user interfaces to system calls; others are considerably more complex • File management - Create, delete, copy, rename, print, dump, list, and generally manipulate files and directories • Status information – Some ask the system for info - date, time, amount of available memory, disk space, number of users – Others provide detailed performance, logging, and debugging information – Typically, these programs format and print the output to the terminal or other output devices – Some systems implement a registry - used to store and unit1 retrieve configuration information OS 49
  • 50. System Programs • File modification – Text editors to create and modify files – Special commands to search contents of files or perform transformations of the text • Programming-language support - Compilers, assemblers, debuggers and interpreters sometimes provided • Program loading and execution- Absolute loaders, relocatable loaders, linkage editors, and overlay-loaders, debugging systems for higher-level and machine language • Communications - Provide the mechanism for creating virtual connections among processes, users, and computer systems – Allow users to send messages to one another’s screens, browse web pages, send electronic-mail messages, log in remotely, transfer files from one machine to another 50 unit1 OS
  • 51. Operating System Design and Implementation • Design and Implementation of OS not “solvable”, but some approaches have proven successful • Internal structure of different Operating Systems can vary widely • Start by defining goals and specifications • Affected by choice of hardware, type of system • User goals and System goals – User goals – operating system should be convenient to use, easy to learn, reliable, safe, and fast – System goals – operating system should be easy to design, implement, and maintain, as well as flexible, reliable, error-free, and efficient unit1 OS 51
  • 52. Operating System Design and Implementation • Important principle to separate Policy: What will be done? Mechanism: How to do it? • Mechanisms determine how to do something, policies decide what will be done – The separation of policy from mechanism is a very important principle, it allows maximum flexibility if policy decisions are to be changed later unit1 OS 52
  • 53. Simple Structure • MS-DOS – written to provide the most functionality in the least space – Not divided into modules – Although MS-DOS has some structure, its interfaces and levels of functionality are not well separated unit1 OS 53
  • 55. Layered Approach • The operating system is divided into a number of layers (levels), each built on top of lower layers. The bottom layer (layer 0), is the hardware; the highest (layer N) is the user interface. • With modularity, layers are selected such that each uses functions (operations) and services of only lower-level layers unit1 OS 55
  • 56. Traditional UNIX System Structure unit1 OS 56
  • 57. UNIX • UNIX – limited by hardware functionality, the original UNIX operating system had limited structuring. The UNIX OS consists of two separable parts – Systems programs – The kernel • Consists of everything below the system-call interface and above the physical hardware • Provides the file system, CPU scheduling, memory management, and other operating-system functions; a large number of functions for one level unit1 OS 57
  • 59. Microkernel System Structure • Moves as much from the kernel into “user” space • Communication takes place between user modules using message passing • Benefits: – Easier to extend a microkernel – Easier to port the operating system to new architectures – More reliable (less code is running in kernel mode) – More secure • Detriments: – Performance overhead of user space to kernel space communication unit1 OS 59
  • 60. Mac OS X Structure unit1 OS 60
  • 61. Modules • Most modern operating systems implement kernel modules – Uses object-oriented approach – Each core component is separate – Each talks to the others over known interfaces – Each is loadable as needed within the kernel • Overall, similar to layers but with more flexible unit1 OS 61
  • 63. Operating System Generation • Operating systems are designed to run on any of a class of machines; the system must be configured for each specific computer site • SYSGEN program obtains information concerning the specific configuration of the hardware system • Booting – starting a computer by loading the kernel • Bootstrap program – code stored in ROM that is able to locate the kernel, load it into memory, and start its execution unit1 OS 63
  • 64. System Boot • Operating system must be made available to hardware so hardware can start it – Small piece of code – bootstrap loader, locates the kernel, loads it into memory, and starts it – Sometimes two-step process where boot block at fixed location loads bootstrap loader – When power initialized on system, execution starts at a fixed memory location • Firmware used to hold initial boot code unit1 OS 64