Git Workshop

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A workshop for installing git, initializing and comitting to a repository, and pushing the repository to github.com.

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Git Workshop

  1. 1. git workshop<br />
  2. 2. ABOUT ME<br />Alex York<br />Consultant<br />www.alexyork.net<br />@alex_york<br />
  3. 3. “You stupid git!”<br />
  4. 4. msysgit<br />Git client for Windows<br />http://code.google.com/p/msysgit/<br />
  5. 5. Installing msysgit (1)<br />
  6. 6. Installing msysgit (2)<br />
  7. 7. Installing msysgit (3)<br />
  8. 8. Installing msysgit (4)<br />
  9. 9. Open “Git Bash”<br />
  10. 10. Names with Æ Ø Å<br />Add an environment variable for HOME<br />So that git will not look in:<br />C:UsersFollesø<br />Right click on My Computer<br />Advanced System Settings<br />Environment Variables<br />Add<br />
  11. 11. Names with Æ Ø Å<br />
  12. 12. Names with Æ Ø Å<br />
  13. 13. Names with Æ Ø Å<br />
  14. 14. First git command: check version<br />git --version<br />
  15. 15. Configure your email<br />git config --global user.email alex-york@hotmail.co.uk<br />
  16. 16. Configure your name<br />git config --global user.name “Alex York”<br />
  17. 17. Generate SSH keys<br />ssh-keygen –C  “alex-york@hotmail.co.uk”  –t rsa<br />That C is UPPERCASE!<br />
  18. 18. Generating SSH keys<br />Press Enter/Return when prompted for file location and your passphrase.<br />
  19. 19. Generated SSH keys<br />The public key will be used later on github.com.<br />Pro tip: make backups of these keys!<br />
  20. 20. Write some code!<br />
  21. 21. Navigating with Git Bash<br />cd /c/Code/NNUG-Hello-World/<br />
  22. 22. Initializing a repository<br />git init<br />
  23. 23. What just happened?<br />
  24. 24. View current status<br />git status<br />
  25. 25. Creating a .gitignore file<br />touch .gitignore<br />
  26. 26. View current status<br />git status<br />
  27. 27. Add to staging area<br />git add .<br />
  28. 28. Add to staging area<br />
  29. 29. Next: commit<br />After adding (and removing?) several times to the staging area...<br />... commit to the repository<br />committing is like a snapshot of your code<br />
  30. 30. Committing to repository<br />git commit –m “Commit message goes here”<br />
  31. 31. Committing to repository<br />
  32. 32. Commit log<br />git log<br />
  33. 33. github.com<br />
  34. 34. SSH Public Key<br />
  35. 35. New Repository (1)<br />
  36. 36. New Repository (2)<br />
  37. 37. You’ve created a github repo!<br />
  38. 38. Add your remote repository<br />git remote add origin<br />git@github.com:alexyork/NNUG-Hello-World.git<br />All on one line!<br />
  39. 39. Push to your remote repo<br />git push origin master<br />
  40. 40. github.com<br />
  41. 41. What next?<br />Find something cool on github<br />git clone git@github.com/whatever<br />Fork something<br />Add a feature, fix a bug<br />Create a pull request<br />Start up an open-source project!<br />
  42. 42. Based on this guide<br />Git For Windows Developers by Jason Meridth<br />http://www.lostechies.com/blogs/jason_meridth/archive/2009/06/01/git-for-windows-developers-git-series-part-1.aspx<br />These slides available at: www.alexyork.net<br />

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