Runons notes powerpoint

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Runons notes powerpoint

  1. 1. Run-On Sentences Identifying and Revising Run On Sentences
  2. 2. Sentence Part Pyramid
  3. 3. Sentence Part Synonyms <ul><li>Independent Clause </li></ul><ul><li>= </li></ul><ul><li>Complete Sentence </li></ul><ul><li>Dependent Clause or Phrase </li></ul><ul><li>= </li></ul><ul><li>Fragment </li></ul>
  4. 4. Reminder <ul><li>Dependent Clauses also begin with a dependent word </li></ul><ul><ul><li>List on p. 220 of your textbook </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>List on p. 27 of grammar packet </li></ul></ul>
  5. 5. Review <ul><li>To the races </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Phrase, DC or IC? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Whenever I see a new car </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Phrase, DC or IC? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>I can’t help but hate the car I own. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Phrase, DC or IC? </li></ul></ul>
  6. 6. Combining Sentence Parts <ul><li>Dependent Clauses (DCs) and Phrases can be joined to Independent Clauses (ICs) easily. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Think about how we fixed fragment sentences </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Independent Clauses (ICs) can be joined to each other, but there are certain ways to correctly join them. </li></ul>
  7. 7. What is a Run-On Sentence? <ul><li>Run on sentence = 2 or more independent clauses (complete sentences) that have not been joined correctly. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Fragments vs. Run-Ons <ul><li>Both are incorrect sentences </li></ul><ul><li>Fragment -- incomplete sentence (missing parts) </li></ul><ul><li>Run-On -- multiple sentences “stuck” together incorrectly in one sentence </li></ul>
  9. 9. Types of Run-On Sentences <ul><li>1) Fused Sentence </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Two sentences joined with no punctuation. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>EXAMPLE: Tiger Woods began playing golf at an early age (sentence #1) he is now the world’s greatest golfer (sentence #2). </li></ul></ul><ul><li>2) Comma Splice </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Two sentences joined with a comma, but no conjunction </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>EXAMPLE: Tiger Wood began playing golf at an early age (sentence #1) , he is now the world’s greatest golfer (sentence #2). </li></ul></ul>
  10. 10. Identifying Run-On Sentences NO Ask yourself: Does the sentence contain two independent clauses (complete sentences)? Can’t be a run-on NO YES Are the clauses joined with ONLY a comma? YES RUN-ON SENTENCE (COMMA SPLICE)
  11. 11. Identifying Run-On Sentences Are the ICs joined together with NO punctuation and NO joining words? YES RUN-ON SENTENCE (FUSED SENTENCE) NO <ul><ul><li>YOU HAVE A COMPLETE SENTENCE </li></ul></ul>
  12. 12. Revising Run-On Sentences There are FOUR ways to revise a run-on sentence.
  13. 13. 1) Revising Run-On Sentences <ul><li>Use a comma AND a coordinating conjunction </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Coordinating conjunctions: (FANBOYS) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>And For </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>But So </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Or Yet </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Nor </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Example </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The paramedic asked where I was hurt , and as soon as I told him, he cut up the leg of my favorite pair of jeans. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Works for FUSED SENTENCES and COMMA SPLICES (comma splices only add conjunction) </li></ul>
  14. 14. 2a) Revising Run-On Sentences <ul><li>Separate the clauses (ideas) with a semi-colon </li></ul><ul><li>semi-colon=; </li></ul><ul><li>Example </li></ul><ul><ul><li>My last trip to the dentist was extremely painful; now I never want to go back there again. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Works for FUSED and COMMA SPLICES (replace comma with semi-colon) when ideas in two independent clauses are closely related </li></ul>
  15. 15. 2b) Revising Run-On Sentences <ul><li>Separate the clauses (ideas) with a semi-colon AND a conjunctive adverb (transitional phrase) LIST on p. 27 of grammar packet </li></ul><ul><li>semi-colon=; </li></ul><ul><li>Example </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Handheld PDAs are gaining in popularity ; however , they are not nearly as popular as cell phones. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Works for FUSED and COMMA SPLICES (replace comma with semi-colon) when ideas in two independent clauses are closely related </li></ul>
  16. 16. 3) Revising Run-On Sentences <ul><li>Divide the clauses (ideas) into separate sentences </li></ul><ul><li>Example </li></ul><ul><ul><li>BEFORE: Why should we spend money on expensive space exploration, we have enough underfunded programs here on Earth. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>AFTER: Why should we spend money on expensive space exploration ? We have enough underfunded programs here on Earth. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Works for FUSED and COMMA SPLICES (replace comma with end punctuation) </li></ul>
  17. 17. 4) Revising Run-On Sentences <ul><li>Change one of the clauses (ideas) into a subordinate clause </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Use this option if one idea seems more important than the other. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Example </li></ul><ul><ul><li>BEFORE: One of the most famous advertising slogans is Wheaties cereal’s “Breakfast of Champions,” it was penned in 1933. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>AFTER: One of the most famous advertising slogans is Wheaties cereal’s “Breakfast of Champions” which was penned in 1933. </li></ul></ul>
  18. 18. Practice <ul><li>The city had one public swimming pool, it stayed packed with children all summer long. </li></ul><ul><li>Is this a run-on sentence? </li></ul><ul><li>If so, what type? </li></ul><ul><li>How can you revise it? </li></ul>
  19. 19. Practice <ul><li>All those crazy equations in my math book looked like insects, maybe I was going to have to rethink my major. </li></ul><ul><li>Is this a run-on sentence? </li></ul><ul><li>If so, what type? </li></ul><ul><li>How can you revise it? </li></ul>
  20. 20. Practice <ul><li>The car was hardly worth trading the frame was twisted and the block was warped. </li></ul><ul><li>Is this a run-on sentence? </li></ul><ul><li>If so, what type? </li></ul><ul><li>How can you revise it? </li></ul>

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