Imagery

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Mrs. Stephanie Loomis, 2011

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  • Anna Louise Swynnerton, 1895Oil on canvas, 87.3 x 101cmAccession Number WAG2640The senses were a favourite subject for artists in the 17th century. They were usually represented in a fairly literal manner.Swynnerton, however, has painted an angel who seems to have descended to earth and now relies on her sight to re-establish her links with heaven. Her rapturous expression suggests not just sight but a vision.Swynnerton was a strong believer in equality for women in art. She was a founder of the Manchester Society of Women Painters. In 1922 she became the first female associate of the Royal Academy since the 18th century.
  • http://www.online-literature.com/emerson/
  • http://www.poets.org/poet.php/prmPID/126
  • http://www.vcu.edu/engweb/transcendentalism/authors/thoreau/
  • Quoted my Martin Luther King Jr. in his speech about Moses just before he died.
  • Thoreau, Henry David. Walden; or , Life in the Woods. Dover Publications. 1995. Print.
  • Imagery

    1. 1. IMAGERYPolitics will eventually be replaced by imagery. The politician will beonly too happy to abdicate in favor of his image, because the image will be much more powerful than he could ever be. Marshall McLuhan
    2. 2. ◦ The use of vivid or figurative language to represent objects, actions, or ideas. ◦ The use of expressive or evocative images in art, literature, or music. ◦ A group or body of related images, as in a painting or poem.Imagery
    3. 3. Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms: imagery, a rather vague critical term covering those uses of language in a literary work that evoke sense‐impressions by literal or figurative reference to perceptible or ‘concrete’ objects, scenes, actions, or states, as distinct from the language of abstract argument or exposition. The imagery of a literary work thus comprises the set of images that it uses; these need not be mental ‘pictures’, but may appeal to senses other than sight. The term has often been applied particularly to the figurative language used in a work, especially to its metaphors and similes. Images suggesting further meanings and associations in ways that go beyond the fairly simple identifications of metaphor and simile are often called symbols. The critical emphasis on imagery in the mid‐20th century, both in New Criticism and in some influential studies of Shakespeare, tended to glorify the supposed concreteness of literary works by ignoring matters of structure, convention, and abstract argument: thus Shakespeares plays were read as clusters or patterns of ‘thematic imagery’ according to the predominance of particular kinds of image (of animals, of disease, etc.), without reference to the action or to the dramatic meaning of characters speeches. See also motif.Imagery
    4. 4. Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms: imagery, a rather vague critical term covering those uses of language in a literary work that evoke by literal or figurative reference to perceptible or ‘concrete’ objects, scenes, actions, or states, as distinct from the language of abstract argument or exposition. The imagery of a literary work thus comprises the set of images that it uses; these need not be mental ‘pictures’, but may appeal to senses other than sight. The term has often been applied particularly to the figurative language used in a work, especially to its metaphors and similes. Images suggesting further meanings and associations in ways that go beyond the fairly simple identifications of metaphor and simile are often called symbols. The critical emphasis on imagery in the mid‐20th century, both in New Criticism and in some influential studies of Shakespeare, tended to glorify the supposed concreteness of literary works by ignoring matters of structure, convention, and abstract argument: thus Shakespeares plays were read as clusters or patterns of ‘thematic imagery’ according to the predominance of particular kinds of image (of animals, of disease, etc.), without reference to the action or to the dramatic meaning of characters speeches. See also motif.
    5. 5. Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms: imagery, a rather vague critical term covering those uses of language in a literary work that evoke sense‐impressions by literal or figurative reference to perceptible or ‘concrete’ objects, scenes, actions, or states, as distinct from the language of abstract argument or exposition. The imagery of a literary work thus comprises the set of images that it uses The term has often been applied particularly to the figurative language used in a work, especially to its metaphors and similes. Images suggesting further meanings and associations in ways that go beyond the fairly simple identifications of metaphor and simile are often called symbols. The critical emphasis on imagery in the mid‐20th century, both in New Criticism and in some influential studies of Shakespeare, tended to glorify the supposed concreteness of literary works by ignoring matters of structure, convention, and abstract argument: thus Shakespeares plays were read as clusters or patterns of ‘thematic imagery’ according to the predominance of particular kinds of image (of animals, of disease, etc.), without reference to the action or to the dramatic meaning of characters speeches. See also motif.
    6. 6. Sight
    7. 7. Sight
    8. 8. Sight as Imagery
    9. 9. Sight as imagery
    10. 10. Sound
    11. 11. Sound
    12. 12. Sound as Imagery
    13. 13. Taste
    14. 14. Taste as Imagery
    15. 15. Taste as Imagery
    16. 16. Taste as Imagery
    17. 17. Taste as Imagery
    18. 18. Taste as Imagery?
    19. 19. Touch
    20. 20. Touch as Imagery
    21. 21. Touch as Imagery
    22. 22. Touch as Imagery?
    23. 23. Touch?
    24. 24. Smell
    25. 25. Smell
    26. 26. Smell as Imagery
    27. 27. Smell as Imagery
    28. 28. Who were the masters of Imagery? Poets of all generations of course, and then came…
    29. 29. The Transcendentalists Who?
    30. 30.  New Englanders mostlyTranscendentalists
    31. 31.  New Englanders mostly Love of natureTranscendentalists
    32. 32.  New Englanders mostly Love of nature Rebelling against industrialismTranscendentalists
    33. 33.  New Englanders mostly Love of nature Rebelling against industrialism Followed the Age of EnlightenmentTranscendentalists
    34. 34.  New Englanders mostly Love of nature Rebelling against industrialism Followed the Age of Enlightenment Well educatedTranscendentalists
    35. 35.  New Englanders mostly Love of nature Rebelling against industrialism Followed the Age of Enlightenment Well educated Well to doTranscendentalists
    36. 36.  New Englanders mostly Love of nature Rebelling against industrialism Followed the Age of Enlightenment Well educated Well to do Looking for a “new” approach to religion and spiritualityTranscendentalists
    37. 37.  New Englanders mostly Love of nature Rebelling against industrialism Followed the Age of Enlightenment Well educated Well to do Looking for a “new” approach to religion and spirituality Just before the (un)Civil WarTranscendentalists
    38. 38.  New Englanders mostly Love of nature Rebelling against industrialism Followed the Age of Enlightenment Well educated Well to do Looking for a “new” approach to religion and spirituality Just before the (un)Civil War Wanted to create a distinctively American style of literatureTranscendentalists
    39. 39. Who were these guys? Glad you asked
    40. 40. Ralph WaldoEmersonLived 1803-1882Most famous work: Nature, acollection of essays publishedanonymously at first.Core Beliefs: individualism,non-conformity, harmonybetween man and natureProponent of abolitionSpoke out against cruelty toNative AmericansBelieved in a “God Immanent”(God is in everything andGod is everything.)
    41. 41. EmersonEmphasized the spiritual“inner self.”Studied a variety ofphilosophers and spiritualguides, including Confucius,Plato, St. Augustine, SirFrancis Bacon, and SamuelTaylor Coleridge.His work continues toinfluence writers, artists,philosophers, andcontemporary culture.
    42. 42. Enough of Emerson He’s everywhere!
    43. 43. Walt Whitman1819-1892Self taught after becoming aprinter’s apprentice.Teacher in a one roomschoolhouse from ages 17 to24.Became a journalist at 24Used poetry to express hisphilosophies.In 1855 he published Leavesof Grass, with 12 untitledpoems.
    44. 44. WhitmanContinued to refine, edit, andadd to the publication until1882.Worked in New Orleans in1848 and became a keyabolitionist upon his return toNew York.Worked with the woundedduring the (un)Civil War andeventually worked for theDepartment of the Interior. Hewas fired when the Secretaryof the Interior learnedWhitman was the author ofLeaves of Grass.
    45. 45. WhitmanWhitman never becamewealthy, but worked until hisdeath in 1892.He cared for an invalid brotherand widowed mother.Lived simply.Believed in the power of man,essential goodness, beautyand truth. He believedindividuals deserved freedomto express themselvesartistically because they arepart of God.He was one of the first toteach the divinity of man.
    46. 46. now thenWhitman’s home
    47. 47. Whitman sounds a little crazy Is there anyone else?
    48. 48. Henry David Thoreau You ain’t seen nothing yet.
    49. 49. 1817-1862 Thoreau made nature his religion. “…one of his first memories was of staying awake at night "looking through the stars to see if I could see God behind them." One might say he never stopped looking into nature for ultimate Truth.”Thoreau
    50. 50. At 28, he decided to leave civilization and commune with Nature. He moved to a small cabin on Walden Pond (Massachusetts), on land owned by Ralph Waldo Emerson. He lived off the land (mostly) for over two years, and wrote his most famous work: Walden; or Life in the Woods.Thoreau
    51. 51. His book didn’t sell at first, so for nine years he rewrote it while working as a surveyor and a pencil maker. He became a lecturer as well, speaking mostly about his time at Walden. He also lectured against slavery and for civil disobediences when the cause was just.Thoreau
    52. 52. He died of tuberculosis at 44. His work has never been out of print, and continues to be a standard course of study in disciplines far outside the literary world.Thoreau
    53. 53. So now what do we do? There must be a catch
    54. 54.  Read a selection from Whitman or Thoreau Write an explanation/analysis of the written work Create the image using photographs and photo manipulation Prepare a presentation for the class on your literature and imageHOMEWORK
    55. 55. God will see that you do not wantsociety…

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