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Education: Public’s Feedback

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Introduction
As the Jubilee administration nears the half-way mark in its term, Ipsos’ most recent survey included questions on a number of issues that are continuing to occupy public, and government, attention. In this Media Release, we cover the following in the Education sector: (1) The laptop project, (2) School-ranking, (3) Teachers’ Pay Demands.

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Education: Public’s Feedback

  1. 1. © 2012 Ipsos. All rights reserved. Contains Ipsos' Confidential and Proprietary information and may not be disclosed or reproduced without the prior written consent of Ipsos. SPEC Barometer Press Release: Education Issues Prepared by: Ipsos Release date: 5th May 2015
  2. 2.  Stalled Laptop Project  Ranking of schools  Teachers’ Pay Debate 2 Contents
  3. 3. 3 Methodology
  4. 4. Methodology 4 Dates of polling 28th March - 7th April 2015 Sample Size 1,964 Sampling methodology Random, Multi-stage stratified using PPS (proportionate to population size) Universe Data collection methodology Sampling error Face-to-Face interviews at the household level Poll funding Ipsos Limited Kenyan adults, aged 18 and above living in Urban and Rural areas +/-2.2% with a 95% confidence level (Note: Higher error-margins for sub-samples)
  5. 5. Sample Structure Statistics 5 Region Sample Frame statistics (April 2015) *Weighted data % Population Census as at 2009 Adults (18 years +) % Central 257 13 2,548,038 13 Coast 173 9 1,711,549 9 Eastern 293 15 2,907,293 15 Nairobi 206 10 2,042,770 10 North Eastern 94* 5 929,158 5 Nyanza 257 13 2,547,980 13 Rift Valley 484 25 4,795,482 25 Western 200 10 1,980,090 10 TOTAL 1,964 100 19,462,360 100
  6. 6. Quality Control Measures  For at least 20% of the interviews, a supervisor is present throughout  Field managers visit at least 15% of the respondents in the sample at their households to confirm the interviews (i.e. back-checking).  After the interview data are electronically transmitted to the Ipsos Server: an independent team then makes random phone calls to 40% of the respondents to confirm that the interviews were conducted with the said respondents (i.e., telephonic back-checks).  Mobile Data Collection Platform captures GPS location (latitudes and longitudes) of interviews conducted to verify the locations of the interviewers in the field alongside allowing silent recording.  Logical data checks are made on selected questionnaire entries to ensure conformity to the sample’s statistical parameters. 6 Ipsos employs quality control measures to ensure the highest possible integrity of obtained results/data
  7. 7. 7 Respondents’ Demographic Profile:
  8. 8. 28% 2% 30% 8% 11% 9% 10% 1% 1% 9% 22% 28% 23% 4% 4% 2% 5% 1% 2% Catholic Catholic Charismatic Mainstream Protestant (ACK,… SDA Evangelical Other Christian Muslim Refused To Answer/None No religion Public Sector wages/salary Private sector wages /salary Gains from self employment/… Agriculture (own/household farm) Livestock Given money by others Pension from previous employment Other Don’t Know Refused To Answer Demographic Profile 10% 9% 13% 25% 5% 15% 13% 10% 51% 49% 28% 29% 18% 25% 37% 63% 100% Nairobi Coast Nyanza Rift Valley North Eastern Eastern Central Western Female Male 18 - 24 25 - 34 35 - 44 45+ Urban Rural Kenyans 8 Region Gender Age Setting Religion Nationality Source of Household Income Base: All Respondents (n=1,964)
  9. 9. Demographic Profile 4% 14% 19% 14% 26% 8% 7% 3% 3% 1% 42% 33% 11% 4% 1% 1% 0% 2% 7% No formal education Some primary education Primary education completed Some secondary education Secondary education completed Some middle level college (not… Completed mid-level college (Not… Some University education University education completed Post Graduate (Masters, MBA, PhD) Less than 10,000 10,001 – 25,000 25,001 – 40,000 40,001 – 55,000 55,001 – 75,000 75,001 – 100,000 100,001 and above Has No income RTA/DK 9 Level of Education Monthly Household Income (ALL members of the Household) Base: All Respondents (n=1,964)
  10. 10. Demographic Profile 41% 18% 11% 10% 7% 5% 5% 2% 1% Self-Employed Unemployed Employed in the private sector Peasant/herder (own farm/pasture) Casual labour Employed in the public sector Student Retired Other 10 Employment Status Base: All Respondents (n=1,964)
  11. 11. 11 Laptops
  12. 12. “If primary schools were made to choose between having a computer laptop center or laboratory for all students, or having laptop computers for Standard One students only, which would you prefer?….?” 12 Base: All Respondents (n=2,059) Laptops for individual Standard 1 students only, 14% Laptop laboratory for all students, 80% Not Sure, 5% RTA, 1% May, 2014
  13. 13. “Regarding the Government’s primary school laptop project, which do you prefer: that each child is given a laptop, or that each school have a laptop laboratory for all pupils?” (By Total, Supporters of the Main Political Parties/Coalitions) 13 15% 78% 6% 12% 79% 8% 17% 79% 4% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Laptops for Each Standard 1 Pupil Laptop Laboratory in Every Primary School Not Sure Total (n=1,964) CORD Supporters (n=624) Jubilee Supporters (n=871)
  14. 14. “What is the main reason you think the Jubilee Government has not implemented the primary school laptop project up to now?”: (By Total) 14 Insufficient Funds, 30% Procurement Corruption, 27% Dishonest/No Sincere Intention, 19% Lack of Proper Planning, 2% Other (10 Mentions), 8% DK, 14% Base: All Respondents (n=1,964)
  15. 15. “ 15 “What is the main reason you think the Jubilee Government has not implemented the primary school laptop project up to now?”: by Total, Supporters of the Main Political Parties/Coalitions Main Reason Total (n=1,964) Jubilee Supporters (n=871) CORD Supporters (n=624) % Difference Insufficient Funds 30% 37% 24% -13% Procurement Corruption 27% 28% 28% 0% Dishonest/No Sincere Intention 19% 14% 26% +12% Lack of Proper Planning 2% 1% 2% +1% Other 8% 7% 8% +1% DK 14% 12% 12% 0%
  16. 16. “Whatever your preference about the laptop plan, do you think it will be implemented before the next election in 2017?” (By Total, Supporters of the Main Political Parties/Coalitions) 16 19% 9% 27% 56% 66% 51% 25% 25% 21% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Total (n=1,964) CORD Supporters (n=624) Jubilee Supporters (n=871) YES NO Not Sure
  17. 17. 17 Teachers’ Pay Debate
  18. 18. “The Government says there is not enough money to increase teachers’ pay. What are two ways you can think of that such additional funds could be found?” (By Total) 18 2% 7% 22% 4% 2% 2% 5% 8% 13% 23% 23% 25% 0% 20% 40% Enough Money Exists Already Not Possible DK Other (10 Mentions) Divert Laptop Money Seek Donor Funding Recover/Sell Corruptly Acquired Assets Reduce Number of Civil Servants Increase VAT Reduce Salaries/Benefits of Elected Officials Reduce Corruption Reduce Number of Elected Officials
  19. 19. “The Government says there is not enough money to increase teachers’ pay. What are two ways you can think of that such additional funds could be found?” (By Total, Supporters of Main Political Parties/Coalitions) 19 Measure Total (n=1,964) Jubilee Supporters (n=871) CORD Supporters (n=624) % Difference Reduce Number of Elected Officials 25% 25% 29% +4% Reduce Salaries/Benefits of Elected Officials 23% 25% 21% -4% Reduce Corruption 23% 23% 24% +1% Increase VAT 13% 13% 15% +2% Reduce Number of Civil Servants 8% 7% 9% +2% Recover/Sell Corruptly Acquired Assets 5% 4% 5% +1% DK 21% 21% 16% -5% Cannot Be Done 7% 8% 5% -3%
  20. 20. 20 School Ranking Debate
  21. 21. “Do you support the ranking of public private primary and secondary schools?” (By Total, Those With/Without a Child in Public/Private/Both/Neither Type of Schools) 21 71% 74% 66% 79% 69%70% 72% 64% 80% 69% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Total (n=1,964) Those With a Child in a Public Primary School (n=641) Those With a Child in a Private Primary School (n=246) Those With Children in Both Types of Schools (n=171) Those With No Children In School (n=906) Primary Schools Secondary Schools % Saying “YES”
  22. 22. For further information contact: Dr Tom Wolf Social Political Consultant tpwolf1944@gmail.com Victor Rateng Project Manager - Opinion Polls victor.rateng@ipsos.com Follow us on twitter: @IpsosKe 22

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