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Nehal Farouk (CAPMAS)• 2018 IFPRI Egypt Seminar: “High quality evidence is critical for high quality nutrition policy”

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as part of the IFPRI-Egypt Seminar Series- funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) project called “Evaluating Impact and Building Capacity” (EIBC) that is implemented by IFPRI.

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Nehal Farouk (CAPMAS)• 2018 IFPRI Egypt Seminar: “High quality evidence is critical for high quality nutrition policy”

  1. 1. HIECS :Data accuracy & extracting indicators Prepared by : CAPMAS &Dr. Heba El lethiy
  2. 2. Points of discussion Introduction Household Income, Expenditure & Consumption Survey Snapshots of the Household Access to Food
  3. 3. Introduction CAPMAS is the main and the official source for data in Egypt. Always seeks to Cooperate with ministres and several international organizations like UNICEF , FAO , UN , and many other important agencies . This is in order to help policy and decision makers to assign the right and suitable plans. CAPMAS conduct several survey which include a huge variety of data , which can be used to have important indicators that will reflect the situation of the population and society from different aspects.
  4. 4. Household Income, Expenditure & Consumption Survey Methodology • Sampling • Reference Period Data Collection • Using Questionnaire • Using Laptop
  5. 5. Household Income, Expenditure & Consumption Survey Sample design : Stratified 2 stage cluster sample , with cluster size 20 HH .where 45% of it represents the percentage of households in urban regions, while 55% represents the percentage of households in rural regions. survey Sample size HIECS 2013 24900HH HIECS 2015 25000 HH HIECS 2017 26000 HH
  6. 6. Household Income, Expenditure & Consumption Survey 2. Data Collection Questionnaires Laptops Income Expenditure & Consumption Food & Drink Diary CAPMAS callback
  7. 7. Household Income, Expenditure & Consumption Survey 1st quarter 2nd quarter 3rd quarter 4th quarter 26 weeks
  8. 8. Household Income, Expenditure & Consumption Survey CAPMAS always seeks to improve its surveys and update the questionniares. The consumption and Expenditure form was improved to monitor the real life of the household, not only in terms of economic aspects but the social aspects also. CAPMAS changed the consumption questionnaire, for example there were around 300 (food & Drink) item but now it became 1000 (food & Drink) item Now , The focus will be on Income & consumption forms because There data allow extracting the following: Indicators for measuring food diversity Measure the amount of food Measuring the nutritional status of children (stunting, thinness and underweight) Strategies to overcome food shortages
  9. 9. 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 3500 Cairo Alexa… Port… Suez Dami… Daka… Shark… Quali… Kafr… Garb… Men… Behe… Ismai… Giza Bani… Fayo… Menia Assiut Sohag Qena Aswan luxor Front… Total Kcal/person/day Fig 1: Average Per Capita Daily Energy Intake -2015 • The minimum daily per capita intake in Egypt is on average 2,462 Kcal/person/day. • 16.3 percent of the population do not meet their minimum daily energy in-take (14.5 million), Average Calorie Intake Average Calorie Intake
  10. 10. • The energy gap increases notably in Upper Egypt . • 65% of the population suffering calorie deficiency are found in Upper Egypt Urban Govs Lower Urban Lower Rural Upper Urban Upper Rural Frontier Urban Frontier Rural Fig 2: Distribution of Population Suffering Calorie Dificiency Average Calorie Intake
  11. 11. Average Calorie Intake 0.0% 20.0% 40.0% 60.0% 80.0% Cairo Alexa… Port… Suez Dami… Daka… Sharkia Quali… Kafr… Garb… Men… Behei… Ismailia Giza Bani… Fayo… Menia Assiut Sohag Qena Aswan luxor Front… Total %ofpopulation Fig 3: Prevelance of Daily Per Capita Energy Deficit - 2015 70% of the population in Qena, about 61% of the population in Sohag and 58.6% in Aswan
  12. 12. Dietary Diversity • Nationally 18.8% of the population are estimated to have poor dietary diversity, the majority (56.2%) in Upper Egypt, followed by Urban Governorates (19.5%) Upper Rural Lower Rural Urban Govs Distribution of Population with Poor Dietary Diversity
  13. 13. Dietary Diversity • Nearly 50% of the population in Sohag and Assuit have poor food diets 0.0% 10.0% 20.0% 30.0% 40.0% 50.0% 60.0% 70.0% 80.0% 90.0% 100.0% Cairo Alexandria PortSaid Suez Damietta Dakahlia Sharkia Qualiobia Kafrel… Garbeyya Menoufia Beheira Ismailia Giza BaniSuef Fayoum Menia Assiut Sohag Qena Aswan luxor Frontiers AllEgypt %ofHouseholds Fig 5: Household Dietary Diversity, 2015 Poor Moderate High
  14. 14. Malnutrition amongst children 0.0% 20.0% 40.0% 60.0% 80.0% 100.0% Urban Govs Urban Lower Rural Lower Urban Upper Rural Upper Frontier Govs Total Fig 6.: Average Number of Daily Meals for Children 6-59 Months 1-2 Meals / Day 3 Meals / Day > 3 Meals / Day
  15. 15. Malnutrition amongst children Stunting tend to be higher in Urban areas, reaching 18.4% compared to 15.2% and in rural areas.
  16. 16. Malnutrition amongst children Obesity tend to be higher in Urban areas, 13.7%, compared to 7.7% in rural areas.
  17. 17. Prevalence of Poor Access to Food • 15.9% of all households are estimated to have “poor access to food”, • this rate increases to 31.7% in Upper Egypt compared to 15.9% in Frontier governorates, 8% in Urban governorates and 6.3% in Lower Egypt • poor access to food tends to be higher in rural areas, compared to their urban counterparts. The prevalence of poor access to food increases to 38.7% in rural Upper Egypt, compared to 16.3% in Urban Upper Egypt,
  18. 18. Contribution of National Food Subsidy Program to Household Calorie Consumption 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 Cairo Alexandria PortSaid Suez Damietta Dakahlia Sharkia Qualiobia Kafrel… Garbeyya Menoufia Beheira Ismailia Giza BaniSuef Fayoum Menia Assiut Sohag Qena Aswan luxor Frontiers AllEgypt %oftotalcalorieintake Fig 5.12: Contribution of Food Subsidy Programme to Total Calorie Intake, 2015 % calorie intake from ration cards % of calorie intake from subsidized bread • Table 5: Impact of Food Subsidy Reforms on Income Poverty Region 2015 Poverty Rates SC1: 100% removal of Subsidy SC2: Removal of Richest 50% Urban Govs 15.11 18.25 15.93 Urban Lower 9.67 12.74 9.90 Rural Lower 19.71 25.27 20.13 Urban Upper 27.40 31.77 27.58 Rural Upper 56.70 61.87 57.30 Urban Frontier 19.27 22.04 19.95 Rural Frontier 28.95 37.64 30.66 Total 27.76 32.33 28.26
  19. 19. Household perceptions on sufficiency of food consumption 63.7% 83.8% 86.4% 63.3% 55.7% 85.2% 28.2% 13.8% 11.8% 32.1% 37.2% 12.8% 8.1% 2.5% 1.8% 4.6% 7.1% 2.1% 0.0% 20.0% 40.0% 60.0% 80.0% 100.0% Urban Govs Urban Lower Rural Lower Urban Upper Rural Upper Frontier Govs Percent of Population Sufficient Food Cons Borderline Insufficient food cons. • 23.4% percent of households reported that they could barely meet their basic food needs, and 4.7 percent reported insufficient access to food. • Urban governorates and Rural Upper Egypt have the highest prevalence of households reporting insufficient food consumption in 2015 (8.1% and 7.1% respectively). Overall, the percent of poor population reporting insufficient or borderline food consumption increased during 2013-2015, from 34.6% to 45.6%, indicating the growing gap between what poor households actually consume and what they perceive as minimum level of food consumption
  20. 20. Thanks

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