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WELCOME
Dean (@deanmalmgren)
Mike (@mstringer)
Laurie (@laurieskelly)
WHY DESIGN?
INTERVIEW
EXPLORE
SYNTHESIZE
SKETCH
OBSERVE
PROTOTYPE
FORM GROUPS
INTERVIEW
INTERVIEW
listen carefully
be thoughtful, ask why, dig deep
empathy is key
10 MINUTES
INTERVIEW
WHEN DATA IS INVOLVED
• Learn about the nuances of a problem
• What makes this relevant for humans?
• Who uses i...
EXPLORE
EXPLORE
build on others thoughts
prefer radical ideas
one mouth at a time
20 MINUTES
EXPLORE
WHEN DATA IS INVOLVED
• Have the attitude that “anything is possible (eventually)”
• Don’t focus too much on the d...
SYNTHESIZE
SYNTHESIZE
clump post-its in groups
stars will force a decision
mistakes are OK
15 MINUTES
SYNTHESIZE
WHEN DATA IS INVOLVED
• Tweak or discard clearly infeasible ideas
• But still focus on usefulness, not feasibil...
SKETCH
SKETCH
sketch out your concepts
ignore distracting details
ugly is just !ine
20 MINUTES
SKETCH
WHEN DATA IS INVOLVED
• Usually sketch many times before writing any code
• Make sure concept addresses one use cas...
OBSERVE
OBSERVE
observe carefully
don’t defend, they’re helping you
empathy is key
10 MINUTES
OBSERVE
• Understand which parts of concept are useful or not (and why!)
• Ask for suggestions and questions
WHEN DATA IS ...
PROTOTYPE
PROTOTYPE
make your concept real
it’s not the !inished product
build for more feedback
40 MINUTES
PROTOTYPE
WHEN DATA IS INVOLVED
• This involves getting data, doing some analysis, and presenting results
• Short iteratio...
THANKS
Dean (@deanmalmgren)
Mike (@mstringer)
Laurie (@laurieskelly)
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Design thinking for dummies (data scientists)

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These are our slides from our Strata 2014 (Santa Clara) workshop.

Published in: Design

Design thinking for dummies (data scientists)

  1. 1. WELCOME Dean (@deanmalmgren) Mike (@mstringer) Laurie (@laurieskelly)
  2. 2. WHY DESIGN?
  3. 3. INTERVIEW EXPLORE SYNTHESIZE SKETCH OBSERVE PROTOTYPE FORM GROUPS
  4. 4. INTERVIEW
  5. 5. INTERVIEW listen carefully be thoughtful, ask why, dig deep empathy is key 10 MINUTES
  6. 6. INTERVIEW WHEN DATA IS INVOLVED • Learn about the nuances of a problem • What makes this relevant for humans? • Who uses it and why?
  7. 7. EXPLORE
  8. 8. EXPLORE build on others thoughts prefer radical ideas one mouth at a time 20 MINUTES
  9. 9. EXPLORE WHEN DATA IS INVOLVED • Have the attitude that “anything is possible (eventually)” • Don’t focus too much on the details of the data or analysis • Speak the language of the problem, not the solution
  10. 10. SYNTHESIZE
  11. 11. SYNTHESIZE clump post-its in groups stars will force a decision mistakes are OK 15 MINUTES
  12. 12. SYNTHESIZE WHEN DATA IS INVOLVED • Tweak or discard clearly infeasible ideas • But still focus on usefulness, not feasibility
  13. 13. SKETCH
  14. 14. SKETCH sketch out your concepts ignore distracting details ugly is just !ine 20 MINUTES
  15. 15. SKETCH WHEN DATA IS INVOLVED • Usually sketch many times before writing any code • Make sure concept addresses one use case well • Use finer tipped markers, pens, and pencils for more detail • Build even more refined wireframes with inkscape/photoshop • Keep using the language of the problem owners, not nerd speak.
  16. 16. OBSERVE
  17. 17. OBSERVE observe carefully don’t defend, they’re helping you empathy is key 10 MINUTES
  18. 18. OBSERVE • Understand which parts of concept are useful or not (and why!) • Ask for suggestions and questions WHEN DATA IS INVOLVED
  19. 19. PROTOTYPE
  20. 20. PROTOTYPE make your concept real it’s not the !inished product build for more feedback 40 MINUTES
  21. 21. PROTOTYPE WHEN DATA IS INVOLVED • This involves getting data, doing some analysis, and presenting results • Short iteration cycle forces you to focus on essential parts • Important thing is to start building trust with end users • The details of feasibility come up here • It’s OK to fail; you’ve got lots of good ideas on the backburner
  22. 22. THANKS Dean (@deanmalmgren) Mike (@mstringer) Laurie (@laurieskelly)

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