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Social curation mapping tool - open resource by @academictribe

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"it's not information overload, it's filter failure." Clay Shirky.

This mapping tool can help people get an overview of their information resources, their collections and their curation habits.

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Social curation mapping tool - open resource by @academictribe

  1. 1. Social Curation Mapping Tool Social Curation Mapping Tool v 1.0 by Joyce Seitzinger /Academic Tribe is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. What is social curation? Social curation is the discovery, selection, collection and sharing of digital artefacts by an individual for a social purpose such as learning, collaboration, identity expression or community participation. An artefact can be any digital resource, like a link, an article or a video. “It is not information overload. It is filter failure.” -Clay Shirky 1. Discovery During discovery you set up, maintain and visit information streams for yourself. 2. Selection During selection you choose artefacts to keep that meet your needs or that of your audience. 3. Collection During collection, you move selected artefacts into an appropriate repository. 4. Sharing During sharing you communicate the existence of an artefact to one of your audiences. List your topics of interest List your favourite artefacts List your favourite collections List three of your audiences Describe your information streams Describe your selection process Describe your collections Describe your audience Your discovery tools Your selection tools Your collection tools Your sharing tools What is the value of your information streams? How do you decide the value of an artefact? What is the value of your collections? What is the value of your sharing? Your curation habit Describe your curation habit. Curation: Use it or lose it How will you use the artefacts you have curated?
  2. 2. Social Curation Mapping Tool Social Curation Mapping Tool v 1.0 by Joyce Seitzinger /Academic Tribe is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. What is social curation? Social curation is the discovery, selection, collection and sharing of digital artefacts by an individual for a social purpose such as learning, collaboration, identity expression or community participation. An artefact can be any digital resource, like a link, an article or a video. “It is not information overload. It is filter failure.” -Clay Shirky 1. Discovery During discovery you set up, maintain and visit information streams for yourself. 2. Selection During selection you choose artefacts to keep that meet your needs or that of your audience. 3. Collection During collection, you move selected artefacts into an appropriate repository. 4. Sharing During sharing you communicate the existence of an artefact to one of your audiences. List your topics of interest What are topics you have an interest in? Be as specific as you can. List as many as you can and feel free to include personal, study or work topics. List your favourite artefacts What are some of the best resources you’ve found and kept? Think, what is a resource you use over and over again? Is there a video, site or podcast you often share with others? List your favourite collections Which of your own collections couldn’t you do without? Is there a collection that someone else has made that you visit often? List three of your audiences List three audiences you cater to. If you want you can also list three audiences you are part of. Describe your information streams What are key web sites for your topics of interest? Which communities would you like to connect with? Who are the key experts and how can you connect with them? Where do they blog, tweet, publish? How can you subscribe? Describe your selection process Do you decide on the value of an artefact in an instant? Is skimming the headline enough? Or do you process an entire article or video first before deciding to save it for safekeeping? What else goes into your selection process? Describe your collections Are your collections very large or do you have lots of smaller collections? Do you name your collections? Do you have subdirectories? Are your collections private, shared or public? Why? Describe your audience Who is your audience? You may have different audiences for different topics. Where can your audiences be found? On the university LMS? On your organizatio’s intranet? On Twitter? Facebook? In which communities? Your discovery tools List your tools & platforms. For example: journal databases, Flipboard, Google alerts, Twitter and Twitter lists, LinkedIn groups, etc. What do you like? What are drawbacks? Can you streamline? Your selection tools The only tool you really need to make a decision on whether an artefact is valuable, is your brain. Your collection tools List your tools & platforms. For example: Evernote, bookmarks, Pinterest, Scoop.It. What do you like about these tools? What are drawbacks? Do you have enough or too many? Your sharing tools List your tools & platforms For example Twitter, Wordpress, Facebook, Facebook groups, etc. What do you like? What are drawbacks? Do you need to streamline your tools? What is the value of your information streams? Do your information streams match the purpose (study/work/research) for which you are curating? Do you have information streams that are distractions? Can they be muted or suspended? How do you decide the value of an artefact? Does it have to be unique? Does it have to be timely? Created by an expert? Shared by someone you trust? Number of times it has been shared? What about its copyright status? How do you think about open resources? What is the value of your collections? Do your collections work for you? How often do you visit them? Can you easily search for an artefact? Can you organize? Can you retrieve? Can you share them with the people you need to? Can others comment? Can others contribute? What is the value of your sharing? Why would your your audience view your collections or artefacts? What is the value for you in sharing your artefacts with others? Does it demonstrate your interest or expertise? How does it influence your professional network or your organisation Your curation habit Describe your curation habit. How often do you check your information streams? At what time of the day? Do you mostly do this alone? In class? At work? When you’re bored? Can you listen to a presentation or a lecture and curate at the same time? Do you use curation and set up collections in project work? Curation: Use it or lose it How will you use the artefacts you have curated? It can be tempting to be forever grazing, however you also need to put your collections of artefacts to good use. Try to build in regular times to reflect, eg weekly. Include your collections when preparing a presentation, a piece of writing or working on a project.

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