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Responsibility - from drama to results

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The slides of my talk about organisational change, drama, and the responsibility process. At Agile Islands 2018 conference.

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Responsibility - from drama to results

  1. 1. Image: pixabay Ari Tanninen Agile Islands 2018 September 25th 2018 “Your living is determined not so much by what life brings you as by the attitude you bring to life; not so much by what happens to you as by the way your mind looks at what happens." — Lewis L. Dunnington Responsibility: from drama to results
  2. 2. Types of organizational change Incremental Strategic Anticipatory Tuning Reorientation Reactive Adaptation Re-creation Organizational frame bending: types of change in the complex organization, Nadler & Tushman, 1988
  3. 3. My role and title changed! My team changed! This won’t work! What’s going to happen? I wasn’t involved! Image: pixabay
  4. 4. Image: Wikipedia / Forbsey
  5. 5. Everyone is complaining! Change resistance! They don’t follow the new organization structure! Act like adults, stop the drama! Image: pixabay They don’t listen!
  6. 6. In an organisation change • Many opportunities to get upset • Lizard brains dominate • Rational thinking, creativity, empathy flew out the window • Getting upset follows a pattern…
  7. 7. The Responsibility Process Denial Lay Blame Justify Shame Obligation Responsibility Quit Upset or problem
  8. 8. Things happen to me. I am the victim of circumstance. I make things happen. I am the cause. Denial Lay Blame Justify Shame Obligation Responsibility Quit
  9. 9. Drama Results Denial Lay Blame Justify Shame Obligation Responsibility Quit
  10. 10. Status quo, forever Growth, change, learning Denial Lay Blame Justify Shame Obligation Responsibility Quit
  11. 11. Automatic reflex, power saver mode engaged Working, thinking, energy intensive Denial Lay Blame Justify Shame Obligation Responsibility Quit
  12. 12. The Responsibility Process • Mental states triggered automatically when we get upset • Coping strategies / comfort zones to alleviate anxiety • Key idea: push through them to get to true responsibility • Based on 20+ years of studies by Bill McCarley and Christopher Avery • Natural and human
  13. 13. Step Symptoms Diagnosis (in your head) Remedy (how to feel better) Responsibility “I choose to” Feeling powerful Feeling ownership Results that matter The problem may be an effect of a larger issue I am missing something from the big picture Somehow I contributed to the issue The problem is how my mind sees the problem Face the pain Look for truth & root issue Solve the root issue for good Quit "Whatever", cynical comments Denying you want it Feeling incomplete, longing No results This is so painful I can’t take it I can’t do anything Give up Disengage mentally Chocolate ice-cream or red wine Obligation “We should”, “I must” Procrastination, resentment Minimal results I have no choice I am trapped I have to but I don’t want to Do the bare minimum and get it over with Shame “I am so stupid” Feeling guilt It’s my fault and I deserve to suffer I can’t do anything I need to change Justify “That’s just how things are” Venting The situation is responsible I can’t do anything Situation needs to change Lay Blame “X is such a…” Venting X is responsible I can’t do anything X needs to change Denial “Problem? What problem?”
  14. 14. { “Shame on you!” “You must apologize!” Mental states endorsed by society “How can you be so stupid!” “If you don’t clean your room, mommy feels sad.” “Give that cookie back to your brother!” { “Stop making excuses and take responsibility!” Mental states renounced by society “No one likes a whiner!” “Are you avoiding responsibility?” “Man up!” Denial Lay Blame Justify Shame Obligation Responsibility Quit
  15. 15. How to drive people “below the line” in an organisation change? Denial Lay Blame Justify Shame Obligation Responsibility Quit
  16. 16. “We must be agile.” “We need a digital transformation!” (or else… something terrible) Start the change from obligation and fear Image: pixabay
  17. 17. Kuva: flickr / highwaysagency
  18. 18. Kuva: flickr / highwaysagency
  19. 19. Avoid involving people Limit access to information, plans, tools, decisions Change people’s titles, jobs, teams without hearing them Image: pixabay Plan the change in a secret cabinet Image: flickr / Wyatt Wellman
  20. 20. Image: pixabay Monitor closely, control behaviour, Judge noncompliance Use fear and pressure DEMAND responsibility Use Management by Perkele
  21. 21. Self-apply only • Demand responsibility —> obligation, shame • Demand responsibility of yourself —> obligation, shame • One can only act from Responsibility if it’s their free choice Image: Wikimedia Commons / National Nuclear Security Administration “All leadership beginswith self-leadership.”— Christopher Avery
  22. 22. How to foster responsibility in an organisation change? Denial Lay Blame Justify Shame Obligation Responsibility Quit
  23. 23. Use all your faculties, and your management team’s Problems become speed bumps Energy is infectious! Chooe to operate from responsibility Image: U.S. Air Force, Senior Airman Kristoffer Kaubisch
  24. 24. Set goals together Foster autonomy Communicate what’s going on and why Involve people in designing their own future Kuva: flickr / Sebastiaan ter Burg
  25. 25. Things happen to me. I am the victim of circumstance. I make things happen. I am the cause. Denial Lay Blame Justify Shame Obligation Responsibility Quit
  26. 26. Show genuine respect, interest, vulnerability Demonstrate responsibility Be a human being first and foremost Image: flickr / Ben Francis
  27. 27. It takes two to tango Denial Lay Blame Justify Shame Obligation Responsibility Quit Denial Lay Blame Justify Shame Obligation Responsibility Quit
  28. 28. Three keys to Responsibility • Intent to operate from responsibility when upset, and to refuse to operate from lay blame, justify, shame, or obligation • Awareness of my mental states, myself, others, and my environment • Confront myself and reality to see what is true
  29. 29. Tools • Intent: celebrating wins • Awareness: diary, catch-it-quicker game, observing others, reminders from trusted friends • Confront: force-field theory, The Work • meditation / mindfulness • practice groups Image: flickr / Andy Ciordia
  30. 30. Confronting questions What happened? What does it mean? What else could it mean? Do you know what you want in this situation? Have you asked for it? How did you contribute to the situation?
  31. 31. Diary March 6th 2016 Dear diary, this week started with a boring team meeting again. My boss sucks all energy out of life. Why do I feel so glum? I will look into this more. March 10th 2016 Dear diary, today I almost got run over by an Audi on the ring road. I guess I must have blamed the driver quite a bit. Applause to me, because a) I noticed I was blaming and b) I did not honk, even though I almost did. Asshole Audi!
  32. 32. “I have to…” “I choose to… because…”
  33. 33. Compassion to yourself and to others Image: Wikimedia Commons
  34. 34. “Responsibility is owning your power and ability to create, choose, and attract your life.” “Leadership is taking responsibility for something - a space, opportunity, problem, etc. - and mobilizing people to help.” — Christopher Avery
  35. 35. Thanks! ari.tanninen@zulia.fi @aritanninen

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