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Why Open with Ian Ronda 10 Nov 2014

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Open Ed Landscape, Open Course Design and Increasing Student Engagement with Dr. Ian O'Byrne and Ronda Dorsey 10 November 2014

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Why Open with Ian Ronda 10 Nov 2014

  1. 1. Open Ed Landscape, Open Course Design and Increasing Student Engagement 10 November 2014 Dr. Ian O’Byrne @wiobyrne Professor, University of New Haven wiobyrne@gmail.com Ronda Neugebauer @openarian Open Instructional Systems Technologist rd@rondadorsey.com Slide content created by Lumen Learning http://lumenlearning.com/and reused under a Creative Commons Attribution CC BY License https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
  2. 2. Why Open? Shared by David Wiley under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 license.
  3. 3. Education is sharing
  4. 4. Successful educators share the most completely with the most students
  5. 5. If there is no sharing there is no education
  6. 6. What can be given without being given away? knowledge
  7. 7. Ideas are non-rivalrous can be given without being given away
  8. 8. Physical expressions are not to give a book you must give it away
  9. 9. When expressions are digital they also become non-rivalrous
  10. 10. Internet offers unprecedented capacity to share and educate as never before
  11. 11. Except we can’t © regulates copying, adapting, distributing
  12. 12. © cancels the possibilities of digital media and the internet
  13. 13. U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics +237%
  14. 14. http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702303812904577295930047604846
  15. 15. Tuition is political textbook adoptions are less political
  16. 16. 82% increase in last decade http://dealnews.com/features/The-Cost-of-Textbooks-Is-Rising-Faster-Than-the-Price-of-College-Tuition-/1037184.html
  17. 17. Average annual textbook costs $1200 14% of tuition state-run public college 39% of tuition community college uspirg.org openaccesstextbooks.org
  18. 18. Impact of textbook costs 60%+ do not purchase textbooks 35% take fewer courses 31% choose not to register 23% regularly go without textbooks 14% dropped course 10% withdrawn from course       2012 student survey by Florida Virtual Campus
  19. 19. Impact of textbook costs • 65% do not buy texts due to high costs • 94% believe they suffer academically not buying texts • 48% register for fewer classes/choose other classes • 82% say they would perform better if text was free online and printed copy was optional RELEASE DATE: MONDAY, JANUARY 27, 2014 http://uspirg.org/sites/pirg/files/reports/NATIONAL%20Fixing%20Broken%20Textbooks%20Report1.pdf
  20. 20. What to do? Shared by David Wiley under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 license.
  21. 21. www.lumenlearning.com
  22. 22. + Institutional Partners Collaborate and leverage open educational resources (OER) to eliminate the textbook cost barrier Shared by David Wiley under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 license.
  23. 23. Sharing and educating at unprecedented scale
  24. 24. OER Defined Shared by David Wiley under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 license.
  25. 25. What are Open Educational Resources (OER)? (1) Any kind of teaching materials – textbooks, syllabi, lesson plans, videos, readings, exams Shared by David Wiley under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 license.
  26. 26. What are Open Educational Resources (OER)? (1) Any kind of teaching materials – textbooks, syllabi, lesson plans, videos, readings, exams What are Open Educational Resources (OER)? (2) Are free for anyone to access, and (3) Include free permission to engage in “5Rs” Shared by David Wiley under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 license.
  27. 27. The 5Rs Retain • Make and own copies Reuse • Use in a wide range of ways Revise • Adapt, modify, improve Remix • Combine two or more Redistribute • Share with others Shared by David Wiley under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 license.
  28. 28. Open licenses make sharing easy simple, standardized, legally robust way to grant copyright permissions Commons licenses provide a simple, standardized grant copyright permissions to creative work. 500+ million items creativecommons.org
  29. 29. OpenStax Biology Text http://cnx.org/contents/185cbf87-c72e-48f5-b51e-f14f21b5eabd@9.17:16
  30. 30. Digital Public Library of America http://dp.la/
  31. 31. Khan Academy https://www.khanacademy.org/
  32. 32. Lumen Learning http://lumenlearning.com/open-courses-overview/
  33. 33. OER
  34. 34. Open ≠ Digital Open ≠ Free OPEN DIGITAL FREE
  35. 35. Mercy College Results (Wallace/Algebra) Percentage passing with C or better 68.90% 63.60% 60.18% 48.40% 64.50% 55.91% 80.00% 70.00% 60.00% 50.00% 40.00% 30.00% 20.00% 10.00% 0.00% Fall 2011 No OER Fall 2012 OER Spring 2011 No OER Spring 2013 OER Total No OER Total OER n=2,842 including pilot
  36. 36. Institutional Partners
  37. 37. The Vision Improve student success by using OER • increase affordability • broaden access to college and content • apply continuous quality improvement to courses
  38. 38. 100% of students have free, digital access on Day 1
  39. 39. Designing for Engagement Shared by David Wiley under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 license.
  40. 40. Instructional Design process based on theoretical and practical research in areas of educational psychology, cognition, and problem solving
  41. 41. Teachers are designers. As with other design professions, standards inform and shape our work. Wiggins & McTighe Understanding by Design Shared by David Wiley under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 license.
  42. 42. Backward Design “begin with the end” Outcomes identify desired results Assessments determine acceptable evidence Content plan learning experiences and instruction
  43. 43. Defining the Roles Collaborative Relationship Faculty Serve as Subject Matter Expert Select acceptable OER Collaborate in Open Course Design process Lumen Mine best of existing OER Support Faculty throughout Ensure Accessibility Share with Community
  44. 44. Institutional Discipline Teams Accounting Art Biology Business Chemistry Earth Science Economics Education English Comp Geography Information Systems Marketing Math Music Online Learning Political Science Psychology Sociology Speech US History
  45. 45. Open Course Design “freedom from the expensive textbook” utilize best of existing OER employ backward design process openly license with faculty attribution share with open community
  46. 46. Approaches in Online Engagement Shared by David Wiley under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 license.
  47. 47. Student Engagement degree of attention, curiosity, interest, optimism and passion shown when actively learning
  48. 48. Online Student Engagement Challenges • choose level of communication • direct how they spend their time • greater opportunities for distractions
  49. 49. Engagement Relationship a high degree of faculty engagement positively influences student satisfaction and retention in online learning Garrison, D. R. (2007). Online community of inquiry review: Social, cognitive and teaching presence issues. Journal of Asynchronous Learning Networks, 11(1), 61-72.
  50. 50. Open Educational Resources Sharing Helps http://goo.gl/Is02wX
  51. 51. Easy Ways to Increase Engagement Post a video introduction Ask students to post video introductions Customize LMS profile Create and share blogs
  52. 52. Easy Ways to Increase Engagement Post screencasts Use RSS feeds Utilize social networking tools Host synchronous meetings Ask for feedback
  53. 53. Qualities of Online Teaching Success Shared by David Wiley under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 license.
  54. 54. Aim to be Prompt Return work within a week of submission Respond to communication within 24 hours • “Chunk” grading on a daily basis • Schedule weekly work day to record grades and return assignments • Keep digital files for answers to common problems to copy, paste, and personalize • Receive and respond to assessments electronically
  55. 55. Show you are Human You are not an avatar! • Online learners need to know you are a real person • Encourage dialogue in responses • Use a conversational style in comments • Provide as much professional and personal information as you are comfortable
  56. 56. Reflect a Positive Demeanor Praise begets interest • Choose words judiciously • Humor can be refreshing • Recognize strengths first then offer specific suggestions for improvement • Include reference links if needed
  57. 57. Support Pragmatism over Zeal Good evaluation leads to improvement • Offer suggestions for completing the course on time • Encourage time management early on by having students communicate their plans for meeting course benchmarks
  58. 58. Find Patience in the Process The ability continuum is wide • Expect a wide range from hi to low of tech knowledge, skills, dispositions • Be prepared to support students in troubleshooting • In the beginning, consider using more flexible criteria for evaluation

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