OER Adoption and Implementation Approaches 0414

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Presentation to Connecticut and Massachusetts institutions on April 23, 2014

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  • CC licensedphoto http://www.flickr.com/photos/62693815@N03/6277209256/
  • Link to research source: http://www.openaccesstextbooks.org/pdf/2012_Exec_Sum_Student_Txtbk_Survey.pdf
  • Link to research source: http://www.openaccesstextbooks.org/pdf/2012_Exec_Sum_Student_Txtbk_Survey.pdf
  • OER Adoption and Implementation Approaches 0414

    1. 1. Open Education Adoption and Impact Strategies April 23, 2014
    2. 2. www.lumenlearning.com Orientation to Open Education • I’m just learning about open education • I have a strong understanding • I feel strong philosophical alignment • I’m pragmatic about its applications • I’m skeptical but listening • I’m not sure what to do next • I have a vision and a plan
    3. 3. www.lumenlearning.com Lumen Learning • Support effective use of OER at scale  Efficacy data  Free AND better • Model openness  Respect, support and build the community  Remain truly open • Diversify the ecosystem  Focus where scale and aggregation provide benefit .com partially owned by a charitable foundation
    4. 4. Lumen Learning OER Pilots Guide institutions through the transition process • Inform leadership • Train and support initial faculty • Guide evaluation • Support scaling plans $5,000 - $10,000 Incl. travel Supported Open Courses Textbook replacement for high-enrollment courses • Content and assessments • Effective design • Analytics-driven enhancements $5 per enrollment (paid by institution) Adaptive Open Courses Textbook replacement for high-enrollment courses • Full personalization of pathways • Cross-course remediation • Self-paced study $40 per enrollment (paid by institution)
    5. 5. Introduction to Open Education Philosophy Definitions Practical Applications Benefits
    6. 6. Education is Sharing teachers with students students with teachers Shared by David Wiley under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 license.
    7. 7. can be given without being given away Ideas are Non-rivalrous
    8. 8. Physical Expressions Are Not to give a book, you must give it away
    9. 9. When Expressions Are Digital they also become non-rivalrous
    10. 10. www.lumenlearning.coCC licensed photo http://www.flickr.com/photos/62693815@N03/6277209256/
    11. 11. www.lumenlearning.co
    12. 12. © Cancels the Possibilities of digital media and the internet
    13. 13. Internet Enables what to do? Copyright Forbids
    14. 14. www.lumenlearning.co
    15. 15. use copyright to enforce sharing
    16. 16. 5Rs: The Powerful Rights of Open • Make, own, and control your own copy of the contentRetain • Use the content in its unaltered formReuse • Adapt, adjust, modify, improve, or alter the contentRevise • Combine the original or revised content with other OER to create something newRemix • Share your copies of the original content, revisions, or remixes with othersRedistribute
    17. 17. Open Licenses Creative Commons
    18. 18. Obscurity is a far greater threat to authors than piracy . Why ? - Tim O’Reilly
    19. 19. Because in the end the love you take is equal to the love you make. Why ? - John Lennon
    20. 20. www.lumenlearning.com What are Open Educational Resources? (1)Any kind of teaching materials – textbooks, syllabi, lesson plans, videos, readings, exams (2) Are free for anyone to access, and (3) Include free permission to engage in the 4R activities: reuse, revise, remix, redistribute What are Open Educational Resources?
    21. 21. Adoption Methodologies and Frameworks Pilot Approaches Program Approaches System/Community Approaches
    22. 22. www.lumenlearning.com The Kaleidoscope Pilot • At least 120 students  Four sections, ideally 2 different disciplines  Courses selected from those with mature solutions • Institutional leadership participation • Training for faculty and support through term (two 3-hour sessions) • Evaluation: success data and surveys
    23. 23. www.lumenlearning.com The Z Degree • An entire Associate’s degree with a $0 textbook cost and only OER • Twenty-two courses • Z designation in the class schedule  Trained faculty  Fully open licensing  Continuous improvement cycle • Student orientation prior to registration
    24. 24. Source: Tidewater Community College Z degree project team
    25. 25. www.lumenlearning.com VCCS/Kaleidoscope Model • Collaborative faculty teams review, align, refine and augment a “course” • Emphasis on use of high-quality existing materials • New work licensed CC-BY • Packaged for adapting and adopting • Training and support for adapters and adopters
    26. 26. Engaging Faculty Members Changing Behavior Faculty Archetypes Course Redesign Process + http://bit.ly/1hopUCV
    27. 27. www.lumenlearning.com Shifting Faculty Engagement with OER • REUSE – This is MY content • REVISE – This is a starting point for improvement • REMIX – This is the best collection of materials for each concept or outcome • REDISTRIBUTION – This exists in a community of collaborators
    28. 28. www.lumenlearning.com Faculty Approaches BUILD ADAPT ADOPT • Develop new materials • Aggregate materials from high-quality OER • Create tools and systems • Create media • Share or publish Similar in scope to writing a new textbook with many collaborators. • Identify high-quality course or resource • Create significant revision • Remix, aggregate • Share or publish Similar in scope to moving from traditional to fully online delivery. • Review open course • Refine for teaching approach • Align with syllabus • Assign and reference Similar in scope to using a new textbook or a major new edition.
    29. 29. Supporting Discovery of OER Searching OER Sources + Course Options +
    30. 30. Common Questions and Challenges Faculty Incentives IP Policies + Bookstores and Economics + Administrative Processes Union Negotiations +
    31. 31. www.lumenlearning.com Faculty Incentives BUILD ADAPT ADOPT • Develop new materials • Aggregate materials from high-quality OER • Create tools and systems • Create media • Share or publish Similar in scope to writing a new textbook with many collaborators. • Identify high-quality course or resource • Create significant revision • Remix, aggregate • Share or publish Similar in scope to moving from traditional to fully online delivery. • Review open course • Refine for teaching approach • Align with syllabus • Assign and reference Similar in scope to using a new textbook or a major new edition.
    32. 32. www.lumenlearning.com Faculty Incentives • Time • Financial appreciation ($500 - $2,000) • Recognition • Student impact data • Support Don’t push on weight-bearing walls.
    33. 33. There is a direct relationship between textbook costs and student success       60%+ do not purchase textbooks at some point due to cost 35% take fewer courses due to textbook cost 31% choose not to register for a course due to textbook cost 23% regularly go without textbooks due to cost 14% have dropped a course due to textbook cost 10% have withdrawn from a course due to textbook cost Source: 2012 student survey by Florida Virtual Campus
    34. 34. www.lumenlearning.com Economics • No textbook required, or partner with bookstore for print fulfillment • Lost tuition from drop/add activity • Lost bookstore revenue • Increased persistence and enrollment • Open course material fees  90% cost reduction  Predictable fee with greater success
    35. 35. New Possibilities Open Pedagogical Approaches Beyond the Textbook
    36. 36. www.lumenlearning.com The True Opportunities 1. Cognitive science-based enhancements to learning materials (Jeffrey Karpicke retrieval over re-reading) 2. Contextualization created and shared by faculty or… 3. Student engagement in creation of learning materials (David Wiley open pedagogy)
    37. 37. Open Pedagogy What kind of activities can students engage in with OER / open data / open access articles that they cannot do otherwise? Shared by David Wiley under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 license.
    38. 38. “Disposable Assignments” • Students hate doing them • You hate grading them • Huge waste of time and energy • Students see value in doing them • You see value in grading them • Actually add value to the world “Valuable Assignments”
    39. 39. From Process to Product In theory, all assignments have students engage in valuable processes. There’s no reason they shouldn’t result in valuable products.
    40. 40. http://bit.ly/wikisblogs
    41. 41. http://pm4id.org/
    42. 42. There is a direct relationship between textbook costs and student success       60%+ do not purchase textbooks at some point due to cost 35% take fewer courses due to textbook cost 31% choose not to register for a course due to textbook cost 23% regularly go without textbooks due to cost 14% have dropped a course due to textbook cost 10% have withdrawn from a course due to textbook cost Source: 2012 student survey by Florida Virtual Campus
    43. 43. There is a direct relationship between textbook costs and student success 100% have access to learning materials on day 1 100% own educational materials for lifelong learning 100% use all educational funding to complete 100% stay in courses for which they register 100% succeed in courses for which they register 100% persist to complete educational goals     

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