Made By Many design research guide

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Our design research guide on how to "design the right thing before designing the thing right. For everyone who are beginners to UX or just need a reminder. We cover design values, interviewing techniques, and empathy.

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Made By Many design research guide

  1. Design Research guide
  2. Design the right thing, before designing the thing right why design research matters to us BECAUSE IT SUCKS BUILDING SOMETHING FOR 9 MONTHS ONLY TO FIND OUT NO ONE ACTUALLY WANTS TO USE IT
  3. Any solution can only be as good as the depth of understanding of the problem. DESIGNING THE RIGHT THING IS ABOUT ASKING “WHAT IS A GOOD PROBLEM TO SOLVE?”
  4. Empathy gives us a deep understanding of the problems of others It helps us ultimately design the right thing because we can see, feel, and understand the perspectives of people who are different from ourselves.
  5. OBSERVE LISTEN TRY IT OURSELVES We gain empathy for people in 3 ways but let’s start with listening
  6. “would you use this if…..” asking hypothetical questions about the future “so what do you think of my idea?” directly pitching your idea People who are new to design research start by asking two types of questions (don’t do this)
  7. It’s the users job to tell us about their problems, it’s our job as designers to solve it. We don’t act on the user’s request, we act on their behalf
  8. “Are you interested in working out?..” People don’t say what they mean, and don’t mean what they say Attitudes help us understand what people think but are a poor reflection of actual behavior. People are bad at predicting what they’ll do in the future. It’s not that we don’t value what people think, it’s just that we can’t make design mandates solely based on people’s opinions. Instead of asking… …a better question is “How many times have you exercised in the past month?” EVERYONE WILL SAY YES TO THIS
  9. “You may say that you like Blond, Jewish, Democrats but you have a habit of reaching out to pot-smoking, Indian, Republicans.. This is called Revealed Preference” - “Looking for someone”, New Yorker Stated vs Revealed preferences Online dating sites know that what people say doesn’t always match their behavior so their design has to accommodate attitudes + actual behavior. They call this difference Stated vs Revealed preferences. Our products messaging should reflect stated preferences, but the designs should be based off of revealed preferences.
  10. The things we find attractive in an online dating profile have almost nothing to do with the things that we find attractive in a real life person when we’re sitting in from of them. We react to a person’s behavior but what we see in a profile are attitudes, preferences, and background characteristics. - Benjamin Karney, UCLA psychology professor
  11. Short answer 5 - 20 Long answer Typically we would speak with 5-20 people.You’ll start seeing clear patterns after speaking with a few carefully selected people. Nielsen Norman group did a study showing 3 users gets you about 75% of the total usability problems. Speaking with 5-6 is a good number. Before we talk about how to interview customers correctly you’re probably wondering, how many people should I speak with?
  12. FRAMEWORK FOR INTERVIEWS TO LEARN ABOUT PROBLEMS WITHOUT DIRECTLY ASKING FOR SOLUTIONS 1. what was the hardest part about? 2. can you tell me the last time that happened? 3. why was that hard? 4. how did you solve that problem? 5. why was your solution not awesome?
  13. HERE’S A SIMPLE FRAMEWORK FOR INTERVIEWS Meet Dave, a tech startup founder with 3 employees “Knowing the bare minimum of what I had to do” “When I wanted my company to be legit” “I always felt like I could get in trouble later” “Felt like lawyers were reaming you every second” “I paid lawyers to help me set it up” 1. what was the hardest part about ______? 2. can you tell me the last time that happened? 3. why was that hard? 4. how did you solve that problem? 5. why was your solution not awesome?
  14. “Knowing the bare minimum of what I had to do” “When I wanted my company to be legit” “I always felt like I could get in trouble later” “Felt like lawyers were reaming you every second” “I paid lawyers to help me set it up” It’s tempting to give Dave exactly what he wants, in this case some type of feature that gives him access to lawyers. But we as a design team know that the solution was the give him the assurance of ‘ knowing the bare minimum’ and ‘not getting in trouble later’ without ever even needing to speak with a lawyer. 1. what was the hardest part about_______? 2. can you tell me the last time that happened? 3. why was that hard? 4. how did you solve that problem? 5. why was your solution not awesome?
  15. Why we observe We observe people with our products or in their natural habitat. Research interviews can teaches us about people’s attitudes and what they say they do but when we observe we see true behaviors. Pairing observation, listening, and doing it ourselves lets see the workarounds and contradictions. The starting point for most of our projects is observation in it’s natural setting. Observation can sharpen our awareness of how people respond to particular arrangements; we notice what people already do intuitively. That helps us make predictions about how people interpret this things we design. -Jane Fulton Suri, IDEO
  16. So after listening to, watching , and doing it yourself you want a list of the following How are people finding creative ways to solve problems they don’t even realize they have. What are the contradictions between what people say and what they actually do Workarounds Contradictions shows you that people actually want your product makes sure your product is designed correctly
  17. “People are already solving their problems somehow, the Workarounds are so unconscious that people don’t even realize that they do it.”
  18. But when I asked him, ‘how did you solve this problem?’ He said 1. found out his friend’s dad owns a specialty athletic boutique 2. reminds himself of the release date 3. finds out if his friend is working there 4. asks him if it’s there 5. pays him ahead of time 6.asks friend to hide it under counter 7. organizes his day to go pick it up after school One athlete mentioned an occasional problem of specialty gear being sold out in his size but that “it wasn’t a big deal to him” We once spoke with athletes about their buying behaviors of specialty athletic gear
  19. His workaround validates our solution but we heard a contradiction between his attitude and workaround so we need to frame our product so he sees the value in it. But when I asked him, ‘how did you solve this problem?’ 1. found out his friend’s dad owns a specialty athletic boutique 2. reminds himself of the release date 3. finds out if his friend is working there 4. asks him if it’s there 5. pays him ahead of time 6.asks friend to hide it under counter 7. organizes his day to go pick it up after school One athlete mentioned an occasional problem of specialty gear being sold out in his size but that “it wasn’t a big deal to him”
  20. Design the right thing, before designing the thing right thoughts on designing the thing right
  21. in order to design the thing right we ask “what is the best way to solve a problem?” Designing the thing right is about designing for the way people already think and matching mental models. We know we designed the right thing when people intuitively know how to use a product without ever even seeing it before.
  22. 1. SIT DOWN AT RESTAURANT 2.WAITER COMES, PLACE ORDER 3. FINISH EATING, STAND UP GET CHECK 4. CHECKS ARE ALREADY SPLIT 5. TIP IS ALREADY INCLUDED 6. PAY AT COUNTER 1. SIT DOWN AT RESTAURANT 2.WAITER COMES, PLACE ORDER 3. FINISH EATING, WAITER BRINGS CHECK 4. FIGURE OUT HOW TO SPLIT CHECK 5. HOW MUCH SHOULD WE TIP? 6. WAIT FOR WAITER TO COME BACK 7. VENMO 5A. (STARE AT FRIEND WHO’S GOOD AT MATH) 4A. (FIGHT FOR CHECK) mental model of eating out in the US mental model of eating out in the Costa Rica
  23. 1. SIT DOWN AT RESTAURANT 2.WAITER COMES, PLACE ORDER 3. FINISH EATING, WAITER BRINGS CHECK 4. CHECKS ARE ALREADY SPLIT 5. TIP IS ALREADY INCLUDED 6. STAND UP, GO PAY IN COUNTER 1. SIT DOWN AT RESTAURANT 2.WAITER COMES, PLACE ORDER 3. FINISH EATING, WAITER BRINGS CHECK 4. FIGURE OUT HOW TO SPLIT CHECK 5. HOW MUCH SHOULD WE TIP? 6. WAIT FOR WAITER TO COME BACK 7. VENMO 5A. (STARE AT FRIEND WHO’S GOOD AT MATH) 4A. (FIGHT FOR CHECK) Eating out in the US Eating out in the Costa Rica Designing the thing right is about designing for the way people already think and matching mental models. If we opened a restaurant in Costa Rica we would have to match their Mental Models for eating out, the same is true for the products we design.
  24. INTERVIEW FRAMEWORK FOR LEARNING ABOUT MENTAL MODELS “where do you go next?” 3. Before each step ask.. “what do you expect will happen?” 4.…and then ask 1. SHOW YOUR PRODUCT OR PROTOTYPE 2.GIVE A SAMPLE TASK 5. KEY AN EYE OUT FOR ANY CONFUSION
  25. do you know the workarounds? do you know the contradictions between what people say and what they actually do? CONCLUSION Designing the right thing.. when you ask ‘where do you go next?’ and ‘what do you think will happen?’ do people consistently give you the correct answer? …designing the thing right
  26. THANK YOU hj@madebymany.com HJ Kwon
  27. DESIGN RESEARCH: VISION + DISCOVERY PROTOTYPING PRODUCTION LAUNCH + SCALE MANAGEMENT + HANDOVER a guide on connecting Design Research to Prototyping Coming soon T E S T LEA RN M AKE

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